March 07, 2013 at 08:00 AM EST
ADHD Symptoms Persist For Most Young Children Despite Treatment

Reports new study in Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

SOURCE: Elsevier

DESCRIPTION:

WASHINGTON D.C., March 7, 2013 /3BL Media/ – A study published in the March 2013 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry found that 9 out of 10 young children with moderate to severe attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) continue to experience serious to severe symptoms and impairment long after their original diagnoses, and in many cases, despite treatment.

The study, a federally funded multi-center study led by investigators at Johns Hopkins Children’s Center, is the largest long-term analysis to date of preschoolers with ADHD, according to the researchers, and sheds much-needed light on the natural course of a condition that is being diagnosed at an increasingly earlier age.

“ADHD is becoming a more common diagnosis in early childhood, so understanding how the disorder progresses in this age group is critical,” said lead researcher Mark Riddle, M.D., a pediatric psychiatrist at Johns Hopkins Children’s Center. “We found that ADHD in preschoolers is a chronic and rather persistent condition, one that requires better long-term behavioral and pharmacological treatments than we currently have.”

The study shows that nearly 90 percent of the 186 youngsters followed continued to struggle with ADHD symptoms six years after diagnosis; children taking ADHD medication had just as severe symptoms as those who were medication-free.

Children with ADHD, ages 3 to 5, were enrolled in the study and treated for several months, after which they were referred to community pediatricians for ongoing care. Over the next six years, the researchers used detailed reports from parents and teachers to track the children’s behavior, school performance, and the frequency and severity of three of ADHD’s hallmark symptoms—inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity. In addition, children had full diagnostic workups by the study’s clinicians at the beginning, halfway through, and at the end of the research.

Symptom severity scores did not differ significantly between the more than two-thirds of children on medication and those off medication, the study showed. Specifically, 62 percent of children taking anti-ADHD drugs had clinically significant hyperactivity and impulsivity, compared with 58 percent of those not taking medicines. And 65 percent of children on medication had clinically significant inattention, compared with 62 percent of their medication-free counterparts. The investigators caution that it remains unclear whether the lack of medication effectiveness was due to suboptimal drug choice or dosage, poor adherence, medication ineffectiveness per se, or some other reason.

“Our study was not designed to answer these questions, but whatever the reason may be, it is worrisome that children with ADHD, even when treated with medication, continue to experience symptoms, and what we need to find out is why that is and how we can do better,” Riddle explained.

Children who had oppositional defiant disorder or conduct disorder in addition to ADHD were 30 percent more likely to experience persistent ADHD symptoms six years after diagnosis, compared with children whose sole diagnosis was ADHD.

“ADHD is considered a neurobehavioral condition and is marked by inability to concentrate, restlessness, hyperactivity and impulsive behavior, and can have profound and long-lasting effects on a child’s intellectual and emotional development,” Riddle added. “It can impair learning, academic performance, peer and family relationships, and even physical safety. Past research has found that children with ADHD are at higher risk for injuries and hospitalizations.”

According to the researchers, more than 7 percent of U.S. children are currently treated for ADHD, and the economic burden of the condition is estimated to be between $36 billion and $52 billion annually.

The research was funded by the National Institute of Mental Health under grant U01 MH60642.

The article “Preschool Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Treatment Study (PATS) 6-Year Follow-Up” by Mark A. Riddle, Kseniya Yershova, Deborah Lazzaretto, Natalya Paykina, Gayane Yenokyan, Laurence Greenhill, Howard Abikoff, Benedetto Vitiello, Tim Wigal, James T. McCracken, Scott H. Kollins, Desiree W. Murray, Sharon Wigal, Elizabeth Kastelic, James J. McGough, Susan dosReis, Audrey Bauzó-Rosario, Annamarie Stehli, Kelly Posner, (http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaac.2012.12.007) appears in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Volume 52, Issue 3 (March 2013), published by Elsevier.

Notes for Editors

Full text of the article is available to credentialed journalists upon request; contact Mary Billingsley at +1 202 966 7300 x105 or mbillingsley@jaacap.org. Journalists wishing to interview the authors may contact Ekaterina Pesheva, epeshev1@jhmi.edu, +1 410 502 9433, +1 410 926 6780 or Helen Jones, hjones49@jhmi.edu, +1 410 502 9422.

All articles published in JAACAP are embargoed until 3PM ET of the day they are published as corrected proofs online. Articles cannot be publicized as accepted abstracts. Contents of the publication should not be released to or by the media or government agencies before this date.

About the Johns Hopkins Children’s Center
Founded in 1912 as the children's hospital at Johns Hopkins, the Johns Hopkins Children's Center offers one of the most comprehensive pediatric medical programs in the country, treating more than 90,000 children each year. Hopkins Children’s is consistently ranked among the top children's hospitals in the nation. Hopkins Children’s is Maryland's largest children’s hospital and the only state-designated Trauma Service and Burn Unit for pediatric patients. It has recognized Centers of Excellence in dozens of pediatric subspecialties, including allergy, cardiology, cystic fibrosis, gastroenterology, nephrology, neurology, neurosurgery, oncology, pulmonary, and transplant. For more information, go tot www.hopkinschildrens.org

About JAACAP
Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP) is the official publication of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. JAACAP is the leading journal focusing exclusively on today's psychiatric research and treatment of the child and adolescent. Published twelve times per year, each issue is committed to its mission of advancing the science of pediatric mental health and promoting the care of youth and their families.

The journal's purpose is to advance research, clinical practice, and theory in child and adolescent psychiatry. It is interested in manuscripts from diverse viewpoints, including genetic, epidemiological, neurobiological, cognitive, behavioral, psychodynamic, social, cultural, and economic. Studies of diagnostic reliability and validity, psychotherapeutic and psychopharmacological treatment efficacy, and mental health services effectiveness are encouraged. The journal also seeks to promote the well-being of children and families by publishing scholarly papers on such subjects as health policy, legislation, advocacy, culture and society, and service provision as they pertain to the mental health of children and families.

About Elsevier
Elsevier is a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services. The company works in partnership with the global science and health communities to publish more than 2,000 journals, including The Lancet and Cell, and close to 20,000 book titles, including major reference works from Mosby and Saunders. Elsevier’s online solutions include ScienceDirect, Scopus, Reaxys, ClinicalKey and Mosby’s Nursing Suite, which enhance the productivity of science and health professionals, and the SciVal suite and MEDai’s Pinpoint Review, which help research and health care institutions deliver better outcomes more cost-effectively.

A global business headquartered in Amsterdam, Elsevier employs 7,000 people worldwide. The company is part of Reed Elsevier Group PLC, a world-leading provider of professional information solutions in the Science, Medical, Legal and Risk and Business sectors, which is jointly owned by Reed Elsevier PLC and Reed Elsevier NV. The ticker symbols are REN (Euronext Amsterdam), REL (London Stock Exchange), RUK and ENL (New York Stock Exchange).

 

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Contact Info:

Mary Billingsley
JAACAP Editorial Office
+1 (202) 966-7300 ext. 105
mbillingsley@jaacap.org

KEYWORDS: JAACAP, ADHD, symptoms, Treatment, Johns Hopkins Children’s Center, chronic condition, medication, Children, preschoolers

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