December 12, 2012 at 14:15 PM EST
He Who Controls The Mobile Photos, Controls The Universe
A funny, and somewhat unexpected thing happened today. Yahoo!, now with Marissa Mayer at the helm, decided that it was time to bring an all new experience to the world when it comes to photo sharing and hosting. It’s a whole lot of new for Flickr’s site and iOS app, and a bit of old nostalgia at play today, which is quite refreshing. One of the killer features of the new Flickr app that most people haven’t picked up on yet is the fact that it’s super simple to build up, and update, your social graph on Flickr. Yes, playing nice with other companies does have its upside. By simply tapping into your Facebook, Twitter and Address Book contacts, you can completely bring Flickr back to life for your friends, and for yourself. It’s quite simple. Let’s not forget that you can also share all of your photos to these services with simplicity. All you have to do is open the app and start connecting your accounts, if they’re not already. With a simple people picker, you can start sending friend requests from Flickr. Some of those folks are already using the service, since basically everyone has a Yahoo! account from “back in the day.” I’ve personally been getting requests all morning, and it’s nice. Below, you can see how simple it is to connect with existing friends using the Flickr app: Will they be shut down by Facebook and Twitter? Let’s hope not. The power of all of this is that Yahoo! has chosen to be a partnership friendly company, basically, not compete with everyone else. With that approach, they are indeed competing with everyone, but in a nicer way. Twitter doesn’t care where you share photos from really, as long as it’s a great experience for its users. Flickr nailed that with Twitter Card integration. When it comes to Instagram and Facebook, locking the photos away is clearly not what Flickr is all about. The company says that it wants to promote and enable content creators, not hide their work away. This approach can win. I predict that this approach will win. And by win, I mean, becoming a leader in the photo space once again. You remember, everyone was on Flickr, talking about Flickr and using Flickr. Will it happen again? Can it? Let’s wait and see.
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A funny, and somewhat unexpected thing happened today. Yahoo!, now with Marissa Mayer at the helm, decided that it was time to bring an all new experience to the world when it comes to photo sharing and hosting. It’s a whole lot of new for Flickr’s site and iOS app, and a bit of old nostalgia at play today, which is quite refreshing.

One of the killer features of the new Flickr app that most people haven’t picked up on yet is the fact that it’s super simple to build up, and update, your social graph on Flickr. Yes, playing nice with other companies does have its upside. By simply tapping into your Facebook, Twitter and Address Book contacts, you can completely bring Flickr back to life for your friends, and for yourself.

It’s quite simple. Let’s not forget that you can also share all of your photos to these services with simplicity.

All you have to do is open the app and start connecting your accounts, if they’re not already. With a simple people picker, you can start sending friend requests from Flickr. Some of those folks are already using the service, since basically everyone has a Yahoo! account from “back in the day.” I’ve personally been getting requests all morning, and it’s nice.

Below, you can see how simple it is to connect with existing friends using the Flickr app:

Will they be shut down by Facebook and Twitter? Let’s hope not.

The power of all of this is that Yahoo! has chosen to be a partnership friendly company, basically, not compete with everyone else. With that approach, they are indeed competing with everyone, but in a nicer way. Twitter doesn’t care where you share photos from really, as long as it’s a great experience for its users. Flickr nailed that with Twitter Card integration.

When it comes to Instagram and Facebook, locking the photos away is clearly not what Flickr is all about. The company says that it wants to promote and enable content creators, not hide their work away. This approach can win. I predict that this approach will win.

And by win, I mean, becoming a leader in the photo space once again. You remember, everyone was on Flickr, talking about Flickr and using Flickr. Will it happen again? Can it? Let’s wait and see.


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