form10k123110.htm
 
 
UNITED STATES
 
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
 
Washington, D.C. 20549
 
________________________
 
FORM 10-K
 
(Mark One)
 
 
[X]
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2010
OR
 
[  ]
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from ___________ to ___________
 
Commission file number 1-5571
________________________
 
RadioShack Corporation Logo
 
RADIOSHACK CORPORATION
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
 
Delaware
75-1047710
(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)
(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
   
Mail Stop CF3-201, 300 RadioShack Circle, Fort Worth, Texas
76102
(Address of principal executive offices)
(Zip Code)
 
Registrant's telephone number, including area code (817) 415-3011
________________________
 
SECURITIES REGISTERED PURSUANT TO SECTION 12(b) OF THE ACT:
 
Title of each class
Name of each exchange on which registered
Common Stock, par value $1 per share
New York Stock Exchange

SECURITIES REGISTERED PURSUANT TO SECTION 12(g) OF THE ACT:  None
 
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.  Yes X No  __
 
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.  Yes __ No X
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.  Yes X No __
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate website, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).  Yes X No __
 
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant's knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by  reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.__
 
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
 
Large accelerated filer [ X ]
Accelerated filer [ ]
Non-accelerated filer [ ]
Smaller reporting company [ ]
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act).  Yes __ No X
 
As of June 30, 2010, the aggregate market value of the voting common stock of the registrant held by non-affiliates of the registrant was $1,941,281,617 based on the New York Stock Exchange closing price. For the purposes of this disclosure only, the registrant has assumed that its directors, executive officers and beneficial owners of 5% or more of the registrant’s common stock as of June 30, 2010, are the affiliates of the registrant.
 
As of February 15, 2011, there were 105,779,701 shares of the registrant's Common Stock outstanding.
 

 
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Documents Incorporated by Reference
Portions of the Proxy Statement for the 2011 Annual Meeting of Stockholders are incorporated by reference into Part III.
 

TABLE OF CONTENTS
     
Page
PART I
   
       
 
Business
3
 
Risk Factors
6
 
Unresolved Staff Comments
10
 
Properties
10
 
Legal Proceedings
13
 
Submission of Matters to a Vote of Security Holders
13
   
Executive Officers of the Registrant
13
     
PART II
   
       
 
Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
14
 
Selected Financial Data
17
 
Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
19
 
Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk
36
 
Financial Statements and Supplementary Data
36
 
Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure
36
 
Controls and Procedures
36
 
Other Information
36
     
PART III
   
       
 
Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance
37
 
Executive Compensation
37
 
Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters
37
 
Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence
38
 
Principal Accountant Fees and Services
38
     
PART IV
   
       
 
Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules
38
   
39
   
40
   
41
   
70
 

 

 
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PART I
 
ITEM 1. BUSINESS.
 
GENERAL
RadioShack Corporation was incorporated in Delaware in 1967. Throughout this report, the terms “our,” “we,” “us” and “RadioShack” refer to RadioShack Corporation, including its subsidiaries. We primarily engage in the retail sale of consumer electronics goods and services through our RadioShack store chain. We seek to differentiate ourselves from our various competitors by providing:
 
·  
Innovative mobile technology products and services, as well as products related to personal and home technology and power supply needs at competitive prices
 
·  
Convenient neighborhood locations
 
·  
Knowledgeable, objective and friendly service
 
·  
Unique private brand offers and exclusive branded promotions
 
Our day-to-day focus is concentrated in four areas:
 
·  
Providing our customers with a positive in-store experience
 
·  
Growing gross profit dollars
 
·  
Controlling costs throughout the organization
 
·  
Utilizing funds generated from operations to enhance long-term shareholder value
 
Additional information regarding our business segments is presented below and in Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations (“MD&A”) included elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
 
U.S. RADIOSHACK COMPANY-OPERATED STORES
At December 31, 2010, we operated 4,486 U.S. company-operated stores under the RadioShack brand located throughout the United States, as well as in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. These stores are located in strip centers and major shopping malls, as well as individual storefronts. Each location carries a broad assortment of both name brand and private brand consumer electronics products.
 
Our product lines are categorized into seven platforms. Our wireless platform includes postpaid and prepaid wireless handsets and communication devices such as scanners and GPS products. Our accessory platform includes home entertainment, wireless, music, computer, video game and GPS accessories; media storage; power adapters; digital imaging products and headphones. Our modern home platform includes home audio and video end-products, personal computing products, residential telephones, and Voice over Internet Protocol products. Our personal electronics platform includes digital cameras, digital music players, toys, satellite radios, video gaming hardware, camcorders, and general radios. Our power platform includes general and special purpose batteries and battery chargers. Our technical platform includes wire and cable, connectivity products, components and tools, and hobby products. We also provide consumers access to third-party services such as prepaid wireless airtime and extended service plans in our service platform.
 
KIOSKS
At December 31, 2010, we operated 1,267 kiosks located throughout most of the United States. These kiosks are located inside Target and Sam’s Club stores. These locations, which are not RadioShack-branded, offer primarily wireless handsets with activation of third-party wireless services.
 
In February 2009, we signed a contract extension with Sam’s Club through March 31, 2011, with a transition period ending June 30, 2011, to continue operating kiosks in certain Sam’s Club locations. As of December 31, 2010, we operated 417 of these kiosks. This transition will begin on April 1, 2011, and conclude on June 30, 2011, with the assignment to Sam’s Club of all kiosks operated by the Company in Sam’s Club stores. As part of the terms of the contract, we assigned the operation of 22 and 66 kiosk locations to Sam’s Club in 2010 and 2009, respectively.
 
In April 2009 we agreed with Sprint to cease our arrangement to jointly operate the Sprint-branded kiosks in operation at that date. This agreement allowed us to operate these kiosks under the Sprint name for a reasonable period of time, allowing us to transition the kiosks to a new format. In August 2009, we transitioned these kiosks to multiple wireless carrier RadioShack-branded locations. Most of these locations are now managed and reported as extensions of existing RadioShack company-operated stores located in the same shopping malls.
 
In the fourth quarter of 2009, we commenced a test rollout of kiosk locations in approximately 100 Target stores. In the third quarter of 2010, we signed a multi-year agreement to operate kiosk locations in certain Target stores (“Target Mobile”). We operated 850 Target Mobile locations at December 31, 2010. We plan to operate Target Mobile locations in approximately 1,450 Target stores by June 30, 2011.
 

 
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OTHER
In addition to the reportable segments discussed above, we have other sales channels and support operations described as follows:
 
Dealer Outlets: At December 31, 2010, we had a network of 1,207 RadioShack dealer outlets, including 34 located outside of North America. Our North American outlets provide name brand and private brand products and services, typically to smaller communities. These independent dealers are often engaged in other retail operations and augment their businesses with our products and service offerings. Our dealer sales derived outside of the United States are not material.
 
RadioShack.com: Products and information are available through our commercial website www.radioshack.com. Online customers can purchase, return or exchange various products available through this website. Additionally, certain products ordered online may be picked up, exchanged or returned at RadioShack stores.
 
International Operations: As of December 31, 2010, there were 211 company-operated stores under the RadioShack brand, nine dealers, and one distribution center in Mexico. Prior to December 2008, these operations were overseen by a joint venture in which we were a slightly less than 50% minority owner with Grupo Gigante, S.A.B. de C.V. In December 2008, we increased our ownership of this joint venture to 100%.
 
Support Operations:
Our retail stores, along with our kiosks and dealer outlets, are supported by an established infrastructure. Below are the major components of this support structure.
 
Distribution Centers - At December 31, 2010, we had four U.S. distribution centers shipping to our U.S. retail locations and dealer outlets. One of these distribution centers also serves as a fulfillment center for our online customers. Additionally, we have a distribution center that ships fixtures to our U.S. company-operated stores and kiosks.
 
RadioShack Technology Services (“RSTS”) - Our management information system architecture is composed of a distributed, online network of computers that links all stores, customer channels, delivery locations, service centers, credit providers, distribution facilities and our home office into a fully integrated system. Each store has its own server to support the point-of-sale (“POS”) system. The majority of our U.S. company-operated stores and kiosks communicate through a broadband network, which provides efficient access to customer support data. This design also allows store management to track daily sales and inventory at the product or sales associate level. RSTS provides the majority of our programming and systems analysis needs.
 
RadioShack Global Sourcing (“RSGS”) - RSGS serves our wide-ranging international import/export, sourcing, evaluation, logistics and quality control needs. RSGS’s activities support our name brand and private brand businesses.
 
Consumer Electronics Manufacturing - We operate two manufacturing facilities in the United States and one in China. These three manufacturing facilities employed approximately 1,800 people as of December 31, 2010. We manufacture a variety of products, primarily sold through our retail outlets, including telephones, antennas, wire and cable products, and a variety of “hard-to-find” parts and accessories for consumer electronics products.
 
 
SEASONALITY
As with most other specialty retailers, our net sales and operating revenues, operating income and operating cash flows are greater during the fourth quarter, which includes the majority of the holiday shopping season in the U.S., than during other periods of the year. There is a corresponding pre-seasonal inventory build-up, which requires working capital related to the anticipated increased sales volume. This is described in “Cash Requirements” in our MD&A. Also, refer to Note 17 – “Quarterly Data (Unaudited)” in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for data showing seasonality trends. We expect this seasonality to continue.
 
 
PATENTS AND TRADEMARKS
We own or are licensed to use many trademarks and service marks related to our RadioShack stores in the United States and in foreign countries. We believe the RadioShack name and marks are well recognized by consumers, and that the name and marks are associated with high-quality products and services. We also believe the loss of the RadioShack name and RadioShack marks would materially adversely affect our business. Our private brand manufactured products are sold primarily under the RadioShack, AUVIO, Accurian, Enercell or Gigaware trademarks. We also own various patents and patent applications relating to consumer electronics products.
 
We do not own any material patents or trademarks associated with our kiosk operations.
 
 
SUPPLIERS AND NAME BRAND RELATIONSHIPS
Our business strategy depends, in part, upon our ability to offer name brand and private brand products, as well as to provide our customers access to third-party services. We utilize a large number of suppliers located in various parts
 

 
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of the world to obtain raw materials and private brand merchandise. We do not expect a lack of availability of raw materials or any single private brand product to have a material effect on our operations overall or on any of our operating segments. We have formed vendor and third-party service provider relationships with well-recognized companies such as Sprint, AT&T, T-Mobile, Verizon, Apple, Casio, Garmin, Hewlett-Packard, Microsoft, Research In Motion, Samsung and SanDisk. In the aggregate, these relationships have or are expected to have a significant effect on both our operations and financial strategy. Certain of these relationships are important to our business; the loss of or disruption in supply from these relationships could materially adversely affect our net sales and operating revenues. Additionally, we have been limited from time to time by various vendors and suppliers on an economic basis where demand has exceeded supply.
 
 
ORDER BACKLOG
We have no material backlog of orders in any of our operating segments for the products or services we sell.
 
 
COMPETITION
Due to consumer demand for wireless products and services, as well as rapid consumer acceptance of new digital technology products, the consumer electronics retail business continues to be highly competitive, driven primarily by technology and product cycles.
 
In the consumer electronics retailing business, competitive factors include price, quality, features, product availability, consumer services, manufacturing and distribution capability, brand reputation and the number of competitors. We compete in the sale of our products and services with several retail formats, including national, regional, and independent consumer electronics retailers. We compete with department and specialty retail stores in more select product categories. We compete with wireless providers in the wireless handset category through their own retail and online presence. We compete with mass merchandisers and other alternative channels of distribution, such as mail order and e-commerce retailers, on a more widespread basis. Numerous domestic and foreign companies also manufacture products similar to ours for other retailers, which are sold under nationally-recognized brand names or private brands.
 
Management believes two primary factors differentiate us from our competition. First, we have an extensive physical retail presence with convenient locations throughout the United States. Second, our specially trained sales staff is capable of providing cost-effective solutions for our customers’ routine electronics needs and distinct electronics wants, assisting with the selection of appropriate products and accessories and, when applicable, assisting customers with service activation.
 
We cannot give assurance that we will compete successfully in the future, given the highly competitive nature of the consumer electronics retail business. Also, in light of the ever-changing nature of the consumer electronics retail industry, we would be materially adversely affected if our competitors were able to offer their products at significantly lower prices. Additionally, we would be materially adversely affected if our competitors were able to introduce innovative or technologically superior products not yet available to us, or if we were unable to obtain certain products in a timely manner or for an extended period of time. Furthermore, our business would be materially adversely affected if we failed to offer value-added solutions or if our competitors were to enhance their ability to provide these value-added solutions.
 
 
EMPLOYEES
As of December 31, 2010, we employed approximately 36,400 people, including 1,300 temporary seasonal employees. Our U.S. employees are not covered by collective bargaining agreements, nor are they members of labor unions. We consider our relationship with our employees to be good.
 
 
AVAILABLE INFORMATION
We are subject to the reporting requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”), and rules and regulations adopted by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) under that Act. The Exchange Act requires us to file reports, proxy statements and other information with the SEC. Copies of these reports, proxy statements and other information can be inspected and copied at:
 
SEC Public Reference Room
100 F Street, N.E.
Room 1580
Washington, D.C.  20549-0213
 
You may obtain information on the operation of the Public Reference Room by calling the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330.  You may also obtain copies of any material we have filed with the SEC by mail at prescribed rates from:
 
Public Reference Section
Securities and Exchange Commission
100 F Street, N.E.
Washington, D.C.  20549-0213
 
You may obtain these materials electronically by accessing the SEC’s home page on the Internet at:
 
http://www.sec.gov
 
In addition, we make available, free of charge on our corporate website, our Annual Report on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, Current Reports on Form 8-K, and amendments to these reports filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Exchange Act, as
 

 
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well as our proxy statements, as soon as reasonably practicable after we electronically file this material with, or furnish it to, the SEC. You may review these documents, under the heading “Investor Relations,” by accessing our corporate website:
 
http://www.radioshackcorporation.com
 
For information regarding the net sales and operating revenues and operating income for each of our business segments for fiscal years ended December 31, 2010, 2009 and 2008, please see Note 16 – “Segment Reporting” in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.
 
 
ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS.
 
One should carefully consider the risks and uncertainties described below, as well as other information set forth in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. There may be additional risks that are not presently material or known, and the following list should not be construed as an exhaustive list of all factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those expressed in forward-looking statements made by us. If any of the events described below occur, our business, results of operations, financial condition, liquidity or access to the capital markets could be materially adversely affected.
 
We may be unable to successfully execute our strategy to provide cost-effective solutions to meet the routine consumer electronics needs and distinct consumer electronics wants of our customers.
 
To achieve our strategy, we have undertaken a variety of strategic initiatives. Our failure to successfully execute our strategy or the occurrence of certain events, including the following, could materially adversely affect our ability to maintain or grow our comparable store sales and our business generally:
 
·  
Our inability to keep our extensive store distribution system updated and conveniently located near our target customers
 
·  
Our employees’ inability to provide solutions, answers, and information related to increasingly complex consumer electronics products
 
·  
Our inability to recognize evolving consumer electronics trends and offer products that customers need or want
 
Adverse changes in national and world-wide economic conditions could negatively affect our business.
 
The continued uncertainty in the economy could have a significant negative effect on U.S. consumer spending, particularly discretionary spending for consumer electronics products, which, in turn, could directly affect our sales. Consumer confidence, recessionary and inflationary trends, equity market levels, consumer credit availability, interest rates, consumers’ disposable income and spending levels, energy prices, job growth, income tax rates and unemployment rates may affect the volume of customer traffic and level of sales in our locations. Continued negative trends of any of these economic conditions, whether national or regional in nature, could materially adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition.
 
In addition, potential disruptions in the capital and credit markets could have a significant effect on our ability to access the U.S. and global capital and credit markets, if needed. These potential disruptions in the capital and credit market conditions could materially adversely affect our ability to borrow under our credit facility, or materially adversely affect the banks that underwrote our credit facility. The availability of financing will depend on a variety of factors, such as economic and market conditions, the availability of credit, and our credit ratings. If needed, we may not be able to successfully obtain any necessary additional financing on favorable terms, or at all.
 
Our inability to increase or maintain profitability of our operations could materially adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition.
 
A critical component of our business strategy is to improve our overall profitability. Our ability to increase profitable sales in existing stores may be affected by:
 
·  
Our success in attracting customers into our stores
 
·  
Our ability to choose the correct mix of products to sell
 
·  
Our ability to keep stores stocked with merchandise customers will purchase
 
·  
Our ability to maintain fully-staffed stores with appropriately trained employees
 
·  
Our ability to remain relevant to the consumer
 
·  
Our ability to sustain existing retail channels such as our kiosks
 
Any reductions or changes in the growth rate of the wireless industry or other changes in the dynamics of the industry could materially adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition.
 
Sales of wireless handsets and the related commissions and residual income constitute a significant portion of our total revenue. Consequently, changes in the wireless industry, such as those discussed below, could materially adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition.
 
Lack of growth in the wireless industry tends to have a corresponding effect on our wireless sales. Because growth in the wireless industry is often driven by the adoption rate
 

 
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of new wireless handset and wireless service technologies, the absence of these new technologies, our suppliers not providing us with these new technologies, or the lack of consumer interest in adopting these new technologies, could materially adversely affect our business.
 
Another change in the wireless industry that could materially adversely affect our business is wireless industry consolidation. Consolidation in the wireless industry could lead to a concentration of competitive strength within a few wireless carriers, which could materially adversely affect our business if our ability to obtain competitive offerings from our wireless suppliers is reduced or if competition increases from wireless carrier stores or other retailers.
 
Our competition is both intense and varied, and our failure to effectively compete could materially adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition.
 
In the retail consumer electronics marketplace, the level of competition is intense. We compete with consumer electronics retail stores as well as big-box retailers, large specialty retailers, discount or warehouse retailers, and alternative channels of distribution such as e-commerce, telephone shopping services and mail order. We also compete with wireless carriers’ retail presence, as discussed above. Some of these competitors are large, have great market presence, and possess significant financial and other resources, which may provide them with competitive advantages over us.
 
Changes in the amount and degree of promotional intensity or merchandising strategy exerted by our current and potential competitors could present us with difficulties in retaining and attracting customers. In addition, pressure from our competitors could require us to reduce prices or increase our costs in one product category or across all our product categories. As a result of this competition, we may experience lower sales, margins or profitability, which could materially adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition.
 
In addition, some of our competitors may use strategies such as lower pricing, value-added services, wider selection of products, larger store size, higher advertising intensity, improved store design, and more efficient sales methods. While we attempt to differentiate ourselves from our competitors by focusing on the electronics specialty retail market, our business model may not enable us to compete successfully against existing and future competitors.
 
We are dependent upon our relationships with a limited number of name brand product and service providers, and our inability to create, maintain and renew relationships with these parties on favorable terms could materially adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition.
 
A significant portion of our net sales and operating revenues is attributable to a limited selection of name brand products and service providers. The concentration of net sales and operating revenues in certain of our platforms, such as our wireless platform, may mean that our sales are more dependent upon a limited number of service providers such as Sprint, AT&T, T-Mobile and Verizon. In the aggregate, these relationships have or are expected to have a significant effect on both our operations and financial strategy. If we are unable to create, maintain or renew our relationships with such third parties on favorable terms or at all, our results of operations and financial condition.
 
Our inability to maintain our historical gross margin levels could materially adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition.
 
Historically, we have maintained gross margin levels ranging from 45% to 48%. We may not be able to maintain these margin levels in the future due to various factors, including increased sales of lower margin products, such as personal electronics products and name brand products, or declines in average selling prices of key products. If sales of lower margin items continue to increase and become a larger percentage of our business without an overall growth in our sales, our gross profit could be materially adversely affected.
 
Our inability to collect receivables from our vendors and service providers could materially adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition.
 
We maintain significant receivable balances from various vendors and service providers such as Sprint, AT&T, T-Mobile, and Verizon consisting of commissions and other funds related to these relationships. At December 31, 2010 and 2009, our net receivables from vendors and service providers were $291.0 million and $247.5 million, respectively. The average payment term for these receivable balances is approximately 45 days. We do not factor these receivables. Changes in the financial condition of one or more of these vendors or service providers could cause a delay or failure in collecting these receivable balances. A significant delay or failure in collecting these receivable balances could materially adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition.
 

 
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Our inability to effectively manage our inventory levels, particularly excess or inadequate amounts of inventory, could materially adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition.
 
We source inventory both domestically and internationally, and our inventory levels are subject to a number of factors, some of which are beyond our control. These factors, including technology advancements, reduced consumer spending and consumer disinterest in our product offerings, could lead to excess inventory levels. Additionally, we may not accurately assess product life cycles, leaving us with excess inventory. To reduce this excess inventory, we may be required to lower our prices, which could materially adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition.
 
Alternatively, we may have inadequate inventory levels for particular items, including popular merchandise, due to factors such as unanticipated high demand for certain products, unavailability of products from our vendors, import delays, labor unrest, untimely deliveries, or the disruption of international, national or regional transportation systems. The effect of the occurrence of any of these factors on our inventory supply could materially adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition.
 
Our inability to attract, retain and grow an effective management team or changes in the cost or availability of a suitable workforce to manage and support our strategies could materially adversely affect our business.
 
Our success depends in large part upon our ability to attract, motivate and retain a qualified management team and employees. Qualified individuals needed to fill necessary positions could be in short supply. The inability to recruit and retain such individuals on a continuous basis could result in high employee turnover at our stores and in our company generally, which could materially adversely affect our business and results of operations. Additionally, competition for qualified employees requires us to continually assess our compensation structure. Competition for qualified employees has required, and in the future could require, us to pay higher wages to attract a sufficient number of qualified employees, resulting in higher labor compensation expense. In addition, mandated changes in the federal minimum wage or in health care reform may materially increase our compensation expense.
 
Our inability to successfully identify and enter into relationships with developers of new technologies or the failure of these new technologies to be adopted by the market could materially adversely affect our ability to increase or maintain our sales and profitability. Additionally, the absence of new services or products and product features in the categories we sell could materially adversely affect our sales and profitability.
 
Our ability to maintain and increase revenues depends, to a large extent, on the periodic introduction and availability of new products, services and technologies. If we fail to identify these new products, services and technologies, or if we fail to enter into relationships with their developers prior to widespread distribution within the market, our sales and profitability could be materially adversely affected. Any new products, services or technologies we identify may have a limited sales life.
 
Furthermore, it is possible that new products, services or technologies will never achieve widespread consumer acceptance, also adversely affecting our sales and profitability. Finally, the lack of innovative consumer electronics products, features or services that can be effectively featured in our store model could also materially adversely affect our ability to increase or maintain our sales and profitability.
 
The occurrence of severe weather events or natural disasters could significantly damage or destroy our retail locations, could prohibit consumers from traveling to our retail locations, or could prevent us from resupplying our stores or distribution centers, especially during the peak winter holiday shopping season.
 
If severe weather or a catastrophic natural event, such as a hurricane or earthquake, occurs in a particular region and damages or destroys a significant number of our stores in that area, our sales could be materially adversely affected. In addition, if severe weather, such as heavy snowfall or extreme temperatures, discourages or restricts customers in a particular region from traveling to our stores, our sales could also be materially adversely affected. If severe weather occurs during the fourth quarter holiday season, the adverse effect on our sales and gross profit could be even greater than at other times during the year because we generate a disproportionate amount of our sales and gross profit during this period.
 
Failure to comply with, or the additional implementation of, laws, rules, and regulations regarding our business could materially adversely affect our business and our results of operations and financial condition.
 
We are subject to various foreign, federal, state, and local laws, rules and regulations including, but not limited to, the
 

 
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Fair Labor Standards Act and ERISA, each as amended, and regulations promulgated by the Federal Trade Commission, SEC, Internal Revenue Service, United States Department of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health Administration, and Environmental Protection Agency. Failure to properly adhere to these and other applicable laws, rules and regulations could result in the imposition of penalties or adverse legal judgments and could materially adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition. Similarly, the cost of complying with newly-implemented laws, rules and regulations could materially adversely affect our business and our results of operations.
 
Risks associated with the suppliers from whom our raw materials and products are sourced could materially adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition.
 
We utilize a large number of suppliers located in various parts of the world to obtain raw materials, private brand merchandise, and other products. If any of our key vendors fail to supply us with products, we may not be able to meet the demands of our customers, and our sales and profitability could be materially adversely affected.
 
We purchase a significant portion of our inventory from manufacturers located in China. Changes in trade regulations (including tariffs on imports) could increase the cost of those items. Although our purchases are denominated in U.S. dollars, changes in the Chinese currency exchange rate against the U.S. dollar or other foreign currencies could cause our vendors to increase the prices of items we purchase from them. The occurrence of any of these events could materially adversely affect our results of operations.
 
Our ability to find qualified vendors that meet our standards and supply products in a timely and efficient manner is a significant challenge, especially with respect to goods sourced from outside the United States. Merchandise quality issues, product safety concerns, trade restrictions, difficulties in enforcing intellectual property rights in foreign countries, work stoppages, transportation capacity and costs, tariffs, political or financial instability, foreign currency exchange rates, monetary, tax and fiscal policies, inflation, deflation, outbreak of pandemics and other factors relating to foreign trade are beyond our control. These and other issues affecting our vendors could materially adversely affect our sales and profitability.
 
Our business is heavily dependent upon information systems, which could result in higher maintenance costs and business disruption.
 
Our business is heavily dependent upon information systems, given the number of individual transactions we process each year. Our information systems include an in-store point-of-sale system that helps us track sales performance, inventory replenishment, product availability, product margin and customer information. In addition, we are in the process of upgrading our in-store point-of-sale system and related processes. These systems are complex and require integration with each other, with some of our service providers, and with our business processes, which may increase the risk of disruption.
 
Our information systems are also subject to damage or interruption from power outages, computer and telecommunications failures, computer viruses, security breaches, catastrophic events and usage errors by our employees. If we encounter damage to our systems, difficulty implementing new systems, or difficulty maintaining and upgrading current systems, our business operations could be disrupted, our sales could decline, and our expenses could increase.
 
Failure to protect the integrity and security of our customers’ information could materially damage our standing with our customers and expose us to litigation.
 
Increasing costs associated with information security including increased investments in technology, the costs of compliance with consumer protection laws, and costs resulting from consumer fraud could materially adversely affect our results of operations. Additionally, if a significant compromise in the security of our customer information, including personal identification data, were to occur, it could materially adversely affect our reputation, results of operations, financial condition, and business operations and could increase the costs we incur to protect against such security breaches.
 
We are subject to other litigation risks and may face liabilities as a result of allegations and negative publicity.
 
Our operations expose us to litigation risks, such as class action lawsuits involving employees, consumers and shareholders. For example, from time to time putative class actions have been brought against us relating to various labor matters. Defending against lawsuits and other proceedings may involve significant expense and divert management’s attention and resources from other matters. In addition, if any lawsuits were brought against us and resulted in a finding of substantial legal liability, it could cause significant reputational harm to us and otherwise materially adversely affect our results of operations, financial condition, and business operations.
 
We conduct business outside the United States, which presents potential risks.
 
We have offices, assets, and generate a portion of our revenue in Mexico, China, including the special administrative region of Hong Kong, and Taiwan. Part of
 

 
9

 


our growth strategy is to expand our international business because we believe the growth rates and the opportunity to implement operating improvements may be greater than those typically achievable in the United States. International operations entail significant risks and uncertainties, including, without limitation:
 
·  
Economic, social and political instability in any particular country or region
 
·  
Changes in currency exchange rates
 
·  
Changes in government restrictions on converting currencies or repatriating funds
 
·  
Changes in foreign laws and regulations or in trade, monetary or fiscal policies
 
·  
High inflation and monetary fluctuations
 
·  
Changes in restrictions on imports and exports
 
·  
Difficulties in hiring, training and retaining qualified personnel, particularly finance and accounting personnel with U.S. GAAP expertise
 
·  
Inability to obtain access to fair and equitable political, regulatory, administrative and legal systems
 
·  
Changes in government tax policy
 
·  
Difficulties in enforcing our contractual rights or enforcing judgments or obtaining a just result in foreign jurisdictions
 
·  
Potentially adverse tax consequences of operating in multiple jurisdictions
 
Any of these factors, by itself or in combination with others, could materially adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition.
 
We may be unable to keep existing stores in current locations or open new stores in desirable locations, which could materially adversely affect our sales and profitability.
 
We may be unable to keep existing stores in current locations or open new stores in desirable locations in the future. We compete with other retailers and businesses for suitable locations for our stores. Local land use, local zoning issues, environmental regulations and other regulations may affect our ability to find suitable locations and also influence the cost of leasing, building or buying our stores. We also may have difficulty negotiating real estate leases and purchase agreements on acceptable terms. Further, to relocate or open new stores successfully, we must hire and train employees for the new locations. Construction, environmental, zoning and real estate delays may negatively affect store openings and increase costs and capital expenditures. In addition, when we open new stores in markets where we already have a presence, our existing locations may experience a decline in sales as a result, and when we open stores in new markets, we may encounter difficulties in attracting customers due to a lack of customer familiarity with our brand, our lack of familiarity with local customer preferences, and seasonal differences in the market. We cannot be certain that new or relocated stores will produce the anticipated sales or return on investment or that existing stores will not be materially adversely affected by new or expanded competition in their market areas.
 
Terrorist activities and governmental efforts to thwart them could materially adversely affect our results of operations.
 
A terrorist attack or series of attacks on the United States could have a significant adverse effect on its economy. This downturn in the economy could, in turn, materially adversely affect our results of operations. The potential for future terrorist attacks, the national and international responses to terrorist attacks, and other acts of war or hostility could cause greater uncertainty and cause the economy to suffer in ways that we cannot predict.
 
ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS.
 
None.
 
ITEM 2. PROPERTIES.
 
Information on our properties is located in our MD&A and financial statements included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K and is incorporated into this Item 2 by reference.
 
The following items are discussed further in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements:
 
Summary of Significant Accounting Policies – Property, Plant and Equipment
Note 2
Supplemental Balance Sheet Disclosures – Property, Plant and Equipment
Note 3
Commitments and Contingencies
Note 13
 
We lease, rather than own, most of our retail facilities. Our stores are located in shopping malls, stand-alone buildings and shopping centers owned by other entities. We lease administrative offices throughout the United States and Mexico and one manufacturing plant in China. We own the property on which our four distribution centers and two manufacturing facilities are located within the United States.

 
 
10

 
 
 
RETAIL LOCATIONS
The table below shows our retail locations at December 31, 2010, allocated among U.S. and Mexico company-operated stores, kiosks and dealer and other outlets.
 
   
Average
                   
   
Store Size
   
At December 31,
 
   
(Sq. Ft.)
   
2010
   
2009
   
2008
 
U.S. RadioShack company-operated stores
    2,482       4,486       4,476       4,453  
Kiosks (1) (2) (3)
    49       1,267       562       688  
Mexico RadioShack company-operated stores
    1,289       211       204       200  
Dealer and other outlets (4)
    N/A       1,219       1,321       1,411  
Total number of retail locations (5)
            7,183       6,563       6,752  

(1)
In April 2009 we agreed with Sprint to cease our arrangement to jointly operate the Sprint-branded kiosks in operation at that date. This agreement allowed us to operate these kiosks under the Sprint name for a reasonable period of time, allowing us to transition the kiosks to a new format. In August 2009, we transitioned these kiosks to multiple wireless carrier RadioShack-branded locations. We managed and reported 111 of these locations as extensions of existing RadioShack company-operated stores located in the same shopping malls at December 31, 2009.
(2)
In February 2009, we signed a contract extension with Sam’s Club through March 31, 2011, with a transition period ending June 30, 2011, to continue operating kiosks in certain Sam’s Club locations. As of December 31, 2010, we operated 417 of these kiosks. This transition will begin on April 1, 2011, and conclude on June 30, 2011, with the assignment to Sam’s Club of all kiosks operated by the Company in Sam’s Club stores. As part of the terms of the contract, we assigned the operation of 22 and 66 kiosk locations to Sam’s Club in 2010 and 2009, respectively.
(3)
In 2009 we conducted a test program of kiosk locations in approximately 100 Target stores. In the third quarter of 2010 we signed a multi-year agreement with Target Corporation to operate wireless kiosks in certain Target stores. In August 2010, we began to open Target Mobile kiosks with the objective of operating kiosks in the majority of Target stores nationwide by mid-2011. As of December 31, 2010, the Company operated 850 Target Mobile kiosks, and it expects to operate kiosks in approximately 1,450 Target stores by June 30, 2011.
(4)
Our dealer and other outlets decreased by 102 and 90 locations, net of new openings, during 2010 and 2009, respectively. These declines were primarily due to the closure of lower volume outlets.
(5)
In 2010, the Company opened 871 retail locations and closed 251 retail locations. In 2009, the Company opened 202 retail locations and closed 391 retail locations. In 2008, the Company opened 131 retail locations, acquired 200 Mexico company-operated stores, and closed 249 retail locations.
 
 
Real Estate Owned and Leased
   
Approximate Square Footage (in thousands)
At December 31,
 
         
2010
               
2009
       
   
Owned
   
Leased
   
Total
   
Owned
   
Leased
   
Total
 
Retail
                                   
RadioShack company-operated stores
    2       11,133       11,135       10       11,209       11,219  
Kiosks
    --       62       62       --       43       43  
Mexico company-operated stores
    --       272       272       --       263       263  
Support Operations
                                               
Manufacturing
    134       320       454       134       320       454  
Distribution centers and office space
    2,056       821       2,877       2,077       726       2,803  
      2,192       12,608       14,800       2,221       12,561       14,782  
 

 
11

 


Below is a listing at December 31, 2010, of our retail locations within the United States and its territories:
 
   
U.S. RadioShack
Stores
 
 
Kiosks
 
Dealers
and Other*
 
 
Total
Alabama
 
49
 
11
 
30
 
90
Alaska
 
--
 
--
 
23
 
23
Arizona
 
76
 
--
 
24
 
100
Arkansas
 
26
 
3
 
38
 
67
California
 
552
 
236
 
39
 
827
Colorado
 
63
 
15
 
31
 
109
Connecticut
 
70
 
20
 
2
 
92
Delaware
 
19
 
1
 
--
 
20
Florida
 
302
 
35
 
28
 
365
Georgia
 
102
 
23
 
34
 
159
Hawaii
 
24
 
--
 
--
 
24
Idaho
 
19
 
--
 
15
 
34
Illinois
 
173
 
79
 
32
 
284
Indiana
 
98
 
36
 
40
 
174
Iowa
 
34
 
21
 
47
 
102
Kansas
 
37
 
15
 
26
 
78
Kentucky
 
54
 
5
 
36
 
95
Louisiana
 
67
 
20
 
17
 
104
Maine
 
22
 
7
 
12
 
41
Maryland
 
98
 
13
 
7
 
118
Massachusetts
 
114
 
31
 
5
 
150
Michigan
 
120
 
77
 
43
 
240
Minnesota
 
61
 
80
 
35
 
176
Mississippi
 
38
 
7
 
18
 
63
Missouri
 
71
 
30
 
52
 
153
Montana
 
7
 
--
 
27
 
34
Nebraska
 
20
 
11
 
20
 
51
Nevada
 
38
 
--
 
7
 
45
New Hampshire
 
32
 
12
 
5
 
49
New Jersey
 
160
 
41
 
6
 
207
New Mexico
 
31
 
5
 
14
 
50
New York
 
330
 
74
 
16
 
420
North Carolina
 
125
 
22
 
38
 
185
North Dakota
 
6
 
4
 
5
 
15
Ohio
 
188
 
38
 
27
 
253
Oklahoma
 
39
 
--
 
29
 
68
Oregon
 
52
 
--
 
20
 
72
Pennsylvania
 
211
 
53
 
24
 
288
Rhode Island
 
21
 
4
 
--
 
25
South Carolina
 
54
 
8
 
18
 
80
South Dakota
 
11
 
2
 
12
 
25
Tennessee
 
67
 
15
 
29
 
111
Texas
 
376
 
143
 
83
 
602
Utah
 
28
 
8
 
19
 
55
Vermont
 
9
 
--
 
8
 
17
Virginia
 
124
 
14
 
36
 
174
Washington
 
91
 
6
 
30
 
127
West Virginia
 
28
 
3
 
8
 
39
Wisconsin
 
70
 
38
 
45
 
153
Wyoming
 
6
 
1
 
16
 
23
                 
District of Columbia
 
13
 
--
 
--
 
13
Puerto Rico
 
56
 
--
 
--
 
56
U.S. Virgin Islands
 
4
 
--
 
--
 
4
   
4,486
 
1,267
 
1,176
 
6,929
 
*Does not include international dealers.
 

 
12

 


ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS.
 
Refer to Note 13 – “Commitments and Contingencies” in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
 
 
ITEM 4.  SUBMISSION OF MATTERS TO A VOTE OF SECURITY HOLDERS.
 
No matters were submitted to a vote of the Company's security holders during the fourth quarter of 2010.
 
 
EXECUTIVE OFFICERS OF THE REGISTRANT (SEE ITEM 10 OF PART III).
 
The following is a list, as of February 15, 2011, of our executive officers and their ages and positions.
 
 
Name
Position
(Date Appointed to Current Position)
Executive
Officer Since
 
Age
Julian C. Day (1)
Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of the Board (July 2006)
2006
58
James F. Gooch (1)
President and Chief Financial Officer (January 2011)
2006
43
Lee D. Applbaum
Executive Vice President – Chief Marketing Officer (September 2008)
2008
40
Bryan E. Bevin (2)
Executive Vice President – Store Operations (January 2008)
2008
47
Scott E. Young
Executive Vice President – Chief Merchandise Officer (April 2010)
2010
49
Mary Ann Doran
Senior Vice President – Human Resources (June 2010)
2010
55
John G. Ripperton
Senior Vice President – Supply Chain (August 2006)
2006
57
Sharon S. Stufflebeme
Senior Vice President – Chief Information Officer (June 2009)
2009
49
Martin O. Moad
Vice President and Controller (August 2007)
2007
54
 
(1)
On January 24, 2011, the Company announced that Mr. Day plans to retire as Chairman of the Board of Directors, Chief Executive Officer and a director of the Company effective at the Company’s next annual meeting of shareholders, currently scheduled to be held on May 19, 2011. In accordance with its succession and transition plan, the Board of Directors named Mr. Gooch President of the Company effective January 24, 2011. Mr. Gooch will become Chief Executive Officer of the Company effective upon Mr. Day’s retirement. Mr. Gooch will also be included in the Company’s slate of nominees for election to the Board of Directors at the next annual meeting of shareholders. The Board has also determined, as an enhancement to its governance structure, to separate the chairman and CEO roles. If reelected, Daniel R. Feehan, the Board’s current presiding director and a member of the Company’s Board since 2003, will become non-executive chairman of the Board upon Mr. Day’s retirement. Mr. Feehan is president and chief executive officer of Cash America International, Inc.
(2)
Mr. Bevin’s last day with the Company will be March 4, 2011.
 
There are no family relationships among the executive officers listed, and there are no undisclosed arrangements or understandings under which any of them were appointed as executive officers. All executive officers of RadioShack Corporation are appointed by the Board of Directors to serve until their successors are appointed or until their death, resignation, retirement, or removal from office.
 
Mr. Day was appointed Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of the Board of RadioShack in July 2006. Prior to his appointment, Mr. Day was a private investor. Mr. Day became the President and Chief Operating Officer of Kmart Corporation, a mass merchandising company, in March 2002 and served as Chief Executive Officer of Kmart from January 2003 to October 2004. Following the merger of Kmart and Sears, Roebuck and Co., a broadline retailer, Mr. Day served as a Director of Sears Holding Corporation (the parent company of Sears, Roebuck and Co. and Kmart Corporation) until April 2006. Mr. Day joined Sears as Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer in 1999, and was promoted to Chief Operating Officer and a member of the Office of the Chief Executive, where he served until 2002.
 
Mr. Gooch was appointed Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer in August 2006. Previously, Mr. Gooch served as Executive Vice President – Chief Financial Officer of Entertainment Publications, LLC, a discount and promotions company, from May 2005 to August 2006. From 1996 to May 2005, Mr. Gooch served in various positions at Kmart Corporation, a mass merchandising company, including Vice President, Controller and Treasurer, and Vice President, Corporate Financial Planning and Analysis.
 
Mr. Applbaum was appointed Executive Vice President and Chief Marketing Officer in September 2008. Previously, Mr. Applbaum was Chief Marketing Officer for The Schottenstein Stores Corporation, a private retail holding company, from February 2007 until August 2008, and Senior Vice President and Chief Marketing Officer for David's Bridal Group, a national bridal retailer, from April 2004 until February 2007. Prior to joining David's Bridal

 
13

 


Group, Mr. Applbaum served in various capacities for Footstar, Inc., a footwear retail holding company, from April 2000 until April 2004, including Chief Marketing Officer of Footstar Athletic and Vice President of Marketing for Footaction USA.
 
Mr. Bevin was appointed Executive Vice President – Store Operations in January 2008. Before joining RadioShack, Mr. Bevin was Senior Vice President, U.S. Operations, for Blockbuster Entertainment, a media entertainment company, from January 2006 until October 2007, and Senior Vice President/General Manager – Games from June 2005 until December 2005. Prior to joining Blockbuster, Mr. Bevin was Vice President of Retail for Cingular, a wireless mobile communications provider, and Managing Director for Interactive Telecom Solutions, a telecommunications management firm. On January 24, 2011, the Company announced Mr. Bevin’s departure.
 
Mr. Young was appointed Executive Vice President – Chief Merchandise Officer in April 2010. Previously, Mr. Young served as Divisional President and Chief Marketing Officer for LodgeNet, a media content delivery provider to guest-based businesses, where he had worked since 2006. Before joining LodgeNet, he spent seven years at Best Buy Co., Inc. where he served as Vice President, Merchandising; Vice President, BBY.com; and Vice President, Digital Entertainment. Earlier in his career, Mr. Young worked in the entertainment and music industry for BMG Entertainment, Inc., Ticketmaster Entertainment, Inc. and EMI Group PLC - also known as Capitol Records.
 
Ms. Doran was appointed Senior Vice President – Human Resources in June 2010. Previously, Ms. Doran served as Senior Vice President of Human Resources for Zale Corp., a jewelry retailer, where she had worked since 1996. Ms. Doran’s earlier experiences in human resources also include The Bombay Company, Inc., a home furnishings retailer, and the Jordan Marsh Stores Corp., a regional department-store chain that ultimately joined the Macy’s organization.
 
Mr. Ripperton was appointed Senior Vice President – Supply Chain Management in August 2006. Mr. Ripperton joined RadioShack in 2000 and has served as Vice President – Distribution, Division Vice President - Distribution, Group General Manager, and Distribution Center Manager. Prior to joining RadioShack, Mr. Ripperton served in the United States Navy for 25 years and retired with the rank of Captain in the Navy’s Supply Corps.
 
Ms. Stufflebeme was appointed Senior Vice President – Chief Information Officer in June 2009. Previously, Ms. Stufflebeme served as Senior Vice President – Chief Information Officer for 7-Eleven, Inc. where she began working in 2004. Before working for 7-Eleven, Inc., she worked for Andersen Consulting, Hitachi Consulting and Michaels Stores, Inc.
 
Mr. Moad was appointed Vice President and Controller in August 2007. He has worked for RadioShack for more than 25 years, and has served as Vice President and Treasurer, Vice President - Investor Relations, Director - Investor Relations, Vice President – Controller (InterTAN, Inc.), Vice President – Assistant Secretary (InterTAN, Inc.), Assistant Secretary (InterTAN, Inc.), Controller – International Division, and Staff Accountant – International Division. InterTAN, Inc. was an NYSE-listed spin-off of RadioShack’s international units.
 
 
PART II
 
 
ITEM 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANT'S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES.
 
 
PRICE RANGE OF COMMON STOCK
Our common stock is listed on the New York Stock Exchange and trades under the symbol "RSH." The following table presents the high and low trading prices for our common stock, as reported in the composite transaction quotations of consolidated trading for issues on the New York Stock Exchange, for each quarter in the two years ended December 31, 2010.
 
Quarter Ended
 
High
   
Low
   
Dividends Declared
 
December 31, 2010
  $ 23.38     $ 17.93     $ 0.25  
September 30, 2010
    23.16       17.87       --  
June 30, 2010
    24.00       17.70       --  
March 31, 2010
    23.91       18.55       --  
                         
December 31, 2009
  $ 20.57     $ 14.82     $ 0.25  
September 30, 2009
    17.45       12.66       --  
June 30, 2009
    15.20       8.38       --  
March 31, 2009
    12.95       6.47       --  

 
HOLDERS OF RECORD
At February 15, 2011, there were 17,530 holders of record of our common stock.
 
 
DIVIDENDS
The Board of Directors annually reviews our dividend policy. On November 4, 2010, our Board of Directors declared an annual dividend of $0.25 per share. The dividend was paid on December 16, 2010, to stockholders of record on November 26, 2010.
 

 
14

 
 
 
PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES BY RADIOSHACK
The following table sets forth information concerning purchases made by or on behalf of RadioShack or any affiliated purchaser (as defined in the SEC’s rules) of RadioShack common stock for the periods indicated.
 
 
 
 
 
Period
 
 
Total Number
of Shares
Purchased
   
 
Average
Price Paid
per Share
   
Total Number of
Shares Purchased as
Part of Publicly
Announced Plans or
Programs (1)
   
Approximate
Dollar Value of Shares
That May Yet Be
Purchased Under
the Plans or Programs (1) (2)
 
October 1 – 31, 2010
    2,253 (3)   $ 21.37       --     $ 200,000,000  
November 1 – 30, 2010
    8,099,464 (4)   $ 20.15 (4)     8,099,464 (4)   $ 101,407,710  
December 1 – 31, 2010
    --     $ --       --     $ 101,407,710  
  Total
    8,101,717               8,099,464          

 
(1)
RadioShack announced a $200 million share repurchase program on July 24, 2008, which has no stated expiration date. On August 20, 2009, we announced a $200 million increase in this share repurchase program. In August 2010, our Board of Directors approved an increase in this share repurchase program from $400 million to $610 million with $500 million available for share repurchases under this program. As of December 31, 2010, $101.4 million of the total authorized amount was available for share repurchases under this program.
(2)
During the period covered by this table, no publicly announced program expired or was terminated, and no determination was made by RadioShack to suspend or cancel purchases under our program.
(3)
Shares acquired by RadioShack for tax withholdings upon vesting of restricted stock awards, which were not repurchased pursuant to a share repurchase program.
(4)
In August 2010, we entered into an accelerated share repurchase program with two investment banks providing for the repurchase of shares of our common stock under our approved share repurchase program. The accelerated share repurchase program consisted of agreements to purchase shares of our common stock from the investment banks for an aggregate purchase price of $300 million. This program concluded in November 2010. Total aggregate shares delivered to us under the accelerated share repurchase program totaled 14.9 million shares at an average purchase price of $20.18 per share, which is reflected in "Average Price Paid per Share" above. After having received an initial delivery of 11.7 million shares in August 2010, we received 3.2 million additional shares under the accelerated share repurchase program, which are presented under "Total Number of Shares Purchased" and "Total Number of Shares Purchased as Part of Publicly Announced Plans or Programs." In addition, after the conclusion of the accelerated share repurchase program, we repurchased an additional $98.6 million worth of shares in the open market at an average price of $20.13 per share, representing 4.9 million shares. For additional information regarding our common stock repurchases, see Note 6 – “Stockholders’ Equity” in Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
 

 
15

 


RADIOSHACK STOCK COMPARATIVE PERFORMANCE GRAPH
The following stock performance graph and related information shall not be deemed “soliciting material” or “filed” with the SEC, nor shall such information be incorporated by reference into any of our future filings under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, or the Exchange Act, except to the extent that we specifically incorporate it by reference in the filing.
 
The graph below compares the cumulative total shareholder return on RadioShack common stock for the last five years with the cumulative total return on the Standard & Poor's 500 Index, of which we are a component, and the Standard & Poor's Specialty Retail Index, of which we are also a component. The S&P Specialty Retail Index is a capitalization-weighted index of domestic equities traded on the NYSE and NASDAQ, and includes high-capitalization stocks representing the specialty retail sector of the S&P 500. The graph assumes an investment of $100 at the close of trading on December 31, 2005, in RadioShack common stock, the S&P 500 Index and the S&P Specialty Retail Index.
 

RadioShack Comparative Performance Graph
 
      12/05       12/06       12/07       12/08       12/09       12/10  
RadioShack Corporation
  $ 100.00     $ 80.95     $ 82.46     $ 59.97     $ 99.27     $ 95.36  
S&P 500 Index
    100.00       115.80       122.16       76.96       97.33       111.99  
S&P Specialty Retail Index
    100.00       106.47       90.83       68.31       95.14       114.91  
 
* Cumulative Total Return assumes dividend reinvestment.
 
Information Source: Standard & Poor's, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies Inc.
 
 
 
16

 


ITEM 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA (UNAUDITED).
 
 
RADIOSHACK CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
   
Year Ended December 31,
 
(Dollars and shares in millions, except per share amounts, ratios, locations and square footage)
 
2010
   
2009
   
2008
   
2007
   
2006 (4)
 
Statements of Income Data
                             
Net sales and operating revenues
  $ 4,472.7     $ 4,276.0     $ 4,224.5     $ 4,251.7     $ 4,777.5  
Operating income
  $ 375.4     $ 369.4     $ 322.2     $ 381.9     $ 156.9  
Net income
  $ 206.1     $ 205.0     $ 189.4     $ 236.8     $ 73.4  
Net income per share:
                                       
Basic
  $ 1.71     $ 1.63     $ 1.47     $ 1.76     $ 0.54  
Diluted
  $ 1.68     $ 1.63     $ 1.47     $ 1.74     $ 0.54  
Shares used in computing net income per share:
                                       
Basic
    120.5       125.4       129.0       134.6       136.2  
Diluted
    122.7       126.1       129.1       135.9       136.2  
Gross profit as a percent of sales
    45.0 %     45.9 %     45.5 %     47.6 %     44.6 %
SG&A expense as a percent of sales
    34.8 %     35.3 %     35.7 %     36.2 %     37.9 %
Operating income as a percent of sales
    8.4 %     8.6 %     7.6 %     9.0 %     3.3 %
                                         
Balance Sheet Data
                                       
Inventories
  $ 723.7     $ 670.6     $ 636.3     $ 705.4     $ 752.1  
Total assets
  $ 2,175.4     $ 2,429.3     $ 2,254.0     $ 1,989.6     $ 2,070.0  
Working capital
  $ 870.6     $ 1,361.2     $ 1,154.4     $ 818.8     $ 615.4  
Capital structure:
                                       
Current debt
  $ 308.0     $ --     $ --     $ --     $ 149.4  
Long-term debt
  $ 331.8     $ 627.8     $ 659.5     $ 348.2     $ 345.8  
Total debt
  $ 639.8     $ 627.8     $ 659.5     $ 348.2     $ 495.2  
Cash and cash equivalents less total debt
  $ (70.4 )   $ 280.4     $ 155.3     $ 161.5     $ (23.2 )
Stockholders' equity
  $ 842.5     $ 1,048.3     $ 860.8     $ 769.7     $ 653.8  
Total capitalization (1)
  $ 1,482.3     $ 1,676.1     $ 1,520.3     $ 1,117.9     $ 1,149.0  
Long-term debt as a % of total capitalization (1)
    22.4 %     37.5 %     43.4 %     31.1 %     30.1 %
Total debt as a % of total capitalization (1)
    43.2 %     37.5 %     43.4 %     31.1 %     43.1 %
Book value per share at year end
  $ 7.97     $ 8.37     $ 6.88     $ 5.87     $ 4.81  
                                         
Financial Ratios
                                       
Return on average stockholders' equity
    20.3 %     21.5 %     22.9 %     33.2 %     11.8 %
Return on average assets
    8.9 %     8.9 %     9.3 %     12.3 %     3.4 %
Annual inventory turnover
    3.5       3.6       3.5       3.3       2.9  
                                         
Other Data
                                       
Adjusted EBITDA (2)
  $ 459.6     $ 462.3     $ 421.3     $ 494.6     $ 285.1  
Dividends declared per share
  $ 0.25     $ 0.25     $ 0.25     $ 0.25     $ 0.25  
Capital expenditures
  $ 80.1     $ 81.0     $ 85.6     $ 45.3     $ 91.0  
Number of retail locations at year end:
                                       
U.S. RadioShack company-operated stores
    4,486       4,476       4,453       4,447       4,467  
Kiosks
    1,267       562       688       739       772  
Mexico RadioShack company-operated stores
    211       204       200       --       --  
Dealer and other outlets
    1,219       1,321       1,411       1,484       1,596  
Total
    7,183       6,563       6,752       6,670       6,835  
Average square footage per U.S. RadioShack
company-operated store
    2,482       2,504       2,505       2,527       2,496  
Comparable store sales increase (decrease) (3)
    4.4 %     1.3 %     (0.6 %)     (8.2 %)     (5.6 %)
Common shares outstanding
    105.7       125.2       125.1       131.1       135.8  
 
This table should be read in conjunction with our MD&A and the Consolidated Financial Statements and related Notes.
 

 
17

 


(1)
Total capitalization is defined as total debt plus total stockholders' equity.
(2)
Adjusted EBITDA, a non-GAAP financial measure, is defined as earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization. Our calculation of adjusted EBITDA is also adjusted for other income or loss. The comparable financial measure to adjusted EBITDA under GAAP is net income. Adjusted EBITDA is used by management to evaluate the operating performance of our business for comparable periods and is a metric used in the computation of annual cash bonuses and long-term cash incentives. Adjusted EBITDA should not be used by investors or others as the sole basis for formulating investment decisions as it excludes a number of important items. We compensate for this limitation by using GAAP financial measures as well in managing our business. In the view of management, adjusted EBITDA is an important indicator of operating performance because adjusted EBITDA excludes the effects of financing and investing activities by eliminating the effects of interest and depreciation costs.
(3)
Comparable store sales include the sales of U.S. and Mexico RadioShack company-operated stores and kiosks with more than 12 full months of recorded sales. Following their closure as Sprint-branded kiosks in August 2009, certain former Sprint-branded kiosk locations became multiple wireless carrier RadioShack-branded locations. At December 31, 2009, we managed and reported 111 of these locations as extensions of existing RadioShack company-operated stores located in the same shopping malls. For purposes of calculating our comparable store sales, we include sales from these locations for periods after they became extensions of existing RadioShack company-operated stores, but we do not include sales from these locations for periods while they were operated as Sprint-branded kiosks.
(4)
These amounts were affected by our 2006 restructuring program. For more information, please refer to our Consolidated Financial Statements and related Notes included in our 2006 Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 
The following table is a reconciliation of adjusted EBITDA to net income.
 
   
Year Ended December 31,
 
(In millions)
 
2010
   
2009
   
2008
   
2007
   
2006 (4)
 
Reconciliation of Adjusted EBITDA to Net Income
                             
Adjusted EBITDA
  $ 459.6     $ 462.3     $ 421.3     $ 494.6     $ 285.1  
                                         
Interest expense, net of interest income
    (39.3 )     (39.3 )     (20.3 )     (16.2 )     (36.9 )
Income tax expense
    (130.0 )     (123.5 )     (110.1 )     (129.8 )     (38.0 )
Depreciation and amortization
    (84.2 )     (92.9 )     (99.1 )     (112.7 )     (128.2 )
Other (loss) income
    --       (1.6 )     (2.4 )     0.9       (8.6 )
Net income
  $ 206.1     $ 205.0     $ 189.4     $ 236.8     $ 73.4  
                                         

 


 
18

 


ITEM 7.  MANAGEMENT'S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS (“MD&A”).
 
This MD&A section discusses our results of operations, liquidity and financial condition, risk management practices, critical accounting policies, and estimates and certain factors that may affect our future results, including economic and industry-wide factors. Our MD&A should be read in conjunction with our consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, as well as the Risk Factors set forth in Item 1A above.
 
 
EXECUTIVE OVERVIEW
RadioShack is a leading national retailer of mobile technology products and services, as well as products related to personal and home technology and power supply needs. RadioShack’s mobile technology products and services include wireless services from all major national carriers. Each U.S. RadioShack company-operated store and wireless kiosk offers services from at least three major national carriers.
 
We have two reportable segments, U.S. RadioShack company-operated stores and kiosks. The U.S. RadioShack company-operated stores segment consists solely of our 4,486 U.S. company-operated retail stores, all operating under the RadioShack brand name in the United States, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Our U.S. RadioShack company-operated stores offer a broad selection of relevant technology products, including innovative mobile devices, accessories, and services, as well as items for personal and home technology and power supply needs. The kiosks segment consists of our network of 1,267 kiosks located throughout the United States. These kiosks, which are not RadioShack-branded, are primarily located in Target and Sam’s Club store locations. Our kiosk locations offer a wide selection of mobile phones, accessories and related services. Our other operations include business activities that are not separately reportable, which include sales to our independent dealers, sales to other third parties through our service centers, sales generated by our www.radioshack.com website and our Mexican subsidiary, sales to commercial customers, and sales to other third parties through our global sourcing and manufacturing operations.
 
Our more than 7,100 locations in the U.S. and Mexico give us a unique competitive advantage in scale, reach and convenience. We strive to differentiate ourselves through an appealing store format, a comfortable store size, a carefully tailored product assortment, and knowledgeable sales experts.
 
We believe RadioShack occupies unique advantages in the consumer electronics marketplace, providing an alternative to big box retailers:
 
·  
We offer a broad selection of relevant technology products, including innovative mobile devices, accessories, and services, as well as items for personal and home technology and power supply needs. Our lineup features leading national brands and wireless carriers, as well as exclusive private brands.
 
·  
We continue to capitalize on the growth of wireless communications and consumer demand for customer-friendly wireless service plans and devices; our mobility assortment has been and will continue to be priced aggressively and is fully competitive with that of any alternative retailer or carrier.
 
·  
We believe we have sufficient financial strength.
 
·  
We believe we are efficient operators and are a high-margin operation with a proven culture of cost control.
 
·  
We have highly trained sales experts who offer friendly and personal service within an inviting, easy-to-shop store environment.
 
As with most other specialty retailers, our net sales and operating revenues, operating income and operating cash flows are greater during the fourth quarter, which includes the majority of the holiday shopping season in the United States and Mexico.
 
External Factors Affecting Our Business
Since the fourth quarter of 2008 we have seen a highly challenging economy and muted consumer spending. However, the consumer electronics industry, particularly the mobile phone industry, has experienced attractive growth rates over the past several years, driven by product innovations and new services. The growth in mobile phones has been driven by growth in both the number of wireless subscribers and an increase in smartphones, which represent the latest in mobile phone technology.
 
A smartphone is a mobile phone that offers more advanced computing ability and connectivity than a basic feature wireless phone. Smartphones typically combine mobile phone capabilities with capabilities previously found on separate devices. Some examples include GPS (global positioning system) navigation, memory players and camera capabilities. We believe this convergence of capabilities into smartphones has contributed to a decline in several other product categories. This convergence trend is likely to continue as smartphones evolve and as more consumers adopt smartphone technology.
 

 
19

 


According to the Consumer Electronics Association (“CEA”), sales of consumer electronics are expected to remain strong, growing by more than 3% in 2011 to $186.4 billion due to the continued adoption of more portable digital products. In 2011, the CEA estimates that smartphone revenues will increase nearly 20% to more than $21 billion.
 
The innovation in certain mature consumer electronic product categories, such as DVD players, camcorders and audio products, has not been sufficient to maintain average selling prices. These mature products have become commoditized and have experienced price declines and reduced margins.
 
Business Strategy and Performance
Our business strategy is focused around three specific goals:
 
·  
Strengthen our financial position and flexibility
 
·  
Improve the quality of our operations, especially customer service
 
·  
Strengthen our product offering and revitalize and contemporize our brand
 
By taking a disciplined approach to cost control and focusing on profitable sales and the strength of our balance sheet, we have been able to make substantial progress toward all three goals.
 
Over the past four years, we improved our margins, returned excess cash to shareholders through share repurchases, and controlled our costs. At the same time, we continued to make operational improvements that reinforced our strategic themes of mobility, innovation, and service. In the third quarter of 2009, we added T-Mobile as a third national wireless carrier to our RadioShack-branded stores, positioning us to meet our customers’ desire for multi-carrier options and to develop more aggressively our position in the wireless market. In addition, we launched our new brand platform – The Shack® – that began to capture the attention of consumers and the marketplace.
 
We have continued to invest in strategic initiatives to drive our long-term success, including:
 
·  
Growing our wireless business by taking advantage of our multiple wireless carrier retail position, the strong product growth cycle, and the growth in penetration of smartphones
 
·  
Strengthening the offering in our non-wireless product platforms by improving our merchandising talent, transitioning to a more productive product assortment, adding more national brands, and increasing exposure of these categories in targeted advertising and marketing
 
·  
Maximizing our dealer and franchise operations by increasing our wireless offerings through these channels and developing a consistent brand experience
 
·  
Partnering with other retailers – such as Target – to provide wireless service offerings in their stores
 
·  
Improving our use of real estate and taking advantage of the current commercial real estate market by reevaluating our leases for improved terms or reduced costs
 
·  
Developing our international growth opportunities through our company-owned stores in Mexico
 
As previously disclosed, in February 2009 we signed a contract extension with Sam’s Club through March 31, 2011, with a transition period ending June 30, 2011, to continue operating wireless kiosks in certain Sam’s Club stores. As of December 31, 2010, we operated 417 of these kiosks. Accordingly, this transition will begin on April 1, 2011, and conclude on June 30, 2011, with the assignment to Sam’s Club of all kiosks operated by the Company in Sam’s Club stores.
 
In the third quarter of 2010 the Company signed a multi-year agreement with Target Corporation to operate wireless kiosks in certain Target stores. In August 2010, we began to roll out Target Mobile kiosks, with the objective of operating kiosks in the majority of Target stores nationwide by mid-2011.  As of December 31, 2010, the Company operated 850 Target Mobile kiosks, and it expects to operate kiosks in approximately 1,450 Target stores by June 30, 2011.
 
Thus, the Sam’s Club transition coincides with the expansion of our kiosk program with Target. We expect a decline in kiosks segment operating income -- reflecting the impact of ramping up the new Target Mobile kiosks and eliminating the Sam’s Club kiosks -- of approximately $10 million to $15 million in full-year 2011 compared to full-year 2010, with growth in kiosks segment operating income expected to resume in 2012 following completion of the Target Mobile kiosk rollout.
 

 
20

 
 
 
RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
 
2010 Summary
Net sales and operating revenues increased $196.7 million, or 4.6%, to $4,472.7 million when compared with last year. Comparable store sales increased 4.4%. This increase was driven by increased sales in our Sprint and AT&T postpaid wireless business, increased sales of prepaid wireless handsets and airtime, and increased sales of wireless accessories. These increases were partially offset by sales declines in digital-to-analog converter boxes, GPS products, netbooks, digital televisions and digital cameras. The inclusion of T-Mobile as a postpaid wireless carrier increased sales for the first nine months of 2010; however, T-Mobile sales decreased in the fourth quarter, when compared to the same period last year.
 
Gross margin decreased by 90 basis points from last year to 45.0%. Gross margin declined primarily due to a higher sales mix of lower margin wireless handsets and incremental promotional and clearance markdowns associated with seasonal sell-through and product transitions in non-wireless platforms.
 
Selling, general and administrative (“SG&A”) expense increased $46.8 million when compared with last year. This increase was driven by incentive compensation paid on increased wireless sales, additional employees to support our Target kiosk locations, and incremental advertising expense related to brand building in the second quarter of 2010. As a percentage of net sales and operating revenues, SG&A decreased by 50 basis points to 34.8%.
 
As a result of the factors above, operating income increased $6.0 million, or 1.6%, to $375.4 million when compared with last year.
 
Net income increased $1.1 million to $206.1 million when compared with last year. Net income per diluted share was $1.68 compared with $1.63 last year.
 
Adjusted EBITDA decreased $2.7 million, or 0.6%, to $459.6 million when compared with last year.
 
 
2010 COMPARED WITH 2009
 
Wireless Service Provider Settlement Agreement
The business terms of our relationships with our wireless service providers are governed by our wireless reseller agreements. These contracts are complex and include provisions determining our upfront commission revenue, net of chargebacks for wireless service deactivations; our acquisition and return of wireless handsets; and, in some cases, future residual revenue, performance targets and marketing development funds. Disputes occasionally arise between the parties regarding the interpretation of these contract provisions.
 
Certain disputes arose with one of the Company’s wireless service providers pertaining to upfront commission revenue for activations prior to July 1, 2010, and related chargebacks for wireless service deactivations. Negotiations regarding resolution of these disputes culminated in the signing of a settlement agreement in July 2010. In connection with the decision to settle these disputes, the Company considered the following: the timing of cash outflows and inflows in connection with the disputed upfront commission revenue and related chargebacks, and the estimated future residual revenue; the benefits of settling the disputes and agreeing to enter into good faith negotiations with the wireless service provider in the third quarter of 2010 to modify the commission and chargeback provisions of our wireless reseller agreement; and the risks associated with the ultimate realization of the estimated future residual revenue.
 
Key elements of the settlement agreement include the following:
 
·  
All disputes relating to upfront commission revenue for activations prior to July 1, 2010, and related chargebacks were settled.
 
·  
The wireless service provider agreed to pay $141 million to the Company on or before July 30, 2010.
 
·  
The Company and the wireless service provider agreed to enter into good faith negotiations in the third quarter of 2010 to modify the commission and chargeback provisions of our wireless reseller agreement.
 
·  
Beginning on July 1, 2010, the wireless service provider was no longer obligated to pay future residual revenue amounts to the Company for a period of time for customers activated on or before June 30, 2010. For the first six months of 2010, these residual revenue amounts averaged approximately $9 million per quarter. Based on this average, we would receive no residual revenue payments from this wireless service provider for eight quarters beginning with the third quarter of 2010 under the terms of the settlement agreement.
 
The effects of the settlement agreement have been reflected in net sales and operating revenues in the consolidated financial statements for 2010.
 
In the third quarter, we reached an agreement with this wireless service provider to modify the commission and chargeback provisions of our wireless reseller agreement. Based on the terms of the settlement agreement, the terms of the amended wireless reseller agreement, and the performance of our business with this wireless service
 

 
21

 


provider, we do not believe that these events will have a material effect on our results of operations for future periods.
 
Net Sales and Operating Revenues
Consolidated net sales increased 4.6% or $196.7 million to $4,472.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2010, compared with $4,276.0 million in 2009. This increase was primarily due to a comparable store sales increase of 4.4% in 2010. The increase in comparable store sales was driven primarily by increased sales in our wireless platform, but was partially offset by decreased sales in our accessory, modern home and personal electronics platforms.

 
Consolidated net sales and operating revenues for our two reportable segments and other sales are as follows:
 
   
Year Ended December 31,
 
(In millions)
 
2010
   
2009
   
2008
 
U.S. RadioShack company-operated stores
  $ 3,808.2     $ 3,650.9     $ 3,611.1  
Kiosks
    271.6       250.0       283.5  
Other (1)
    392.9       375.1       329.9  
Consolidated net sales and operating revenues
  $ 4,472.7     $ 4,276.0     $ 4,224.5  
                         
Consolidated net sales and operating revenues increase (decrease)
    4.6 %     1.2 %     (0.6 %)
Comparable store sales increase (decrease) (2)
    4.4 %     1.3 %     (0.6 %)

(1)
Net sales and operating revenues for 2010 and 2009 include the consolidation of our Mexican subsidiary.
(2)
Comparable store sales include the sales of U.S. and Mexico RadioShack company-operated stores as well as kiosks with more than 12 full months of recorded sales. Following their closure as Sprint-branded kiosks in August 2009, certain former Sprint-branded kiosk locations became multiple wireless carrier RadioShack-branded locations. At December 31, 2009, we managed and reported 111 of these locations as extensions of existing RadioShack company-operated stores located in the same shopping malls. For purposes of calculating our comparable store sales, we include sales from these locations for periods after they became extensions of existing RadioShack company-operated stores, but we do not include sales from these locations for periods while they were operated as Sprint-branded kiosks.
 
The following table provides a summary of our consolidated net sales and operating revenues by platform and as a percent of net sales and operating revenues. These consolidated platform sales include sales from our U.S. RadioShack company-operated stores and kiosks, as well as other sales.
 
   
Consolidated Net Sales and Operating Revenues
 
   
Year Ended December 31,
 
(In millions)
 
2010
   
2009
   
2008
 
Wireless
  $ 2,128.2       47.6 %   $ 1,634.3       38.2 %   $ 1,388.5       32.9 %
Accessory (1)
    858.2       19.2       1,036.3       24.2       1,140.0       27.0  
Modern home
    516.6       11.5       585.3       13.7       556.8       13.2  
Personal electronics
    412.5       9.2       463.6       10.9       565.4       13.4  
Power
    222.0       5.0       225.3       5.3       243.1       5.7  
Technical
    179.5       4.0       181.3       4.2       184.5       4.4  
Service
    130.3       2.9       114.5       2.7       93.8       2.2  
Other sales (2)
    25.4       0.6       35.4       0.8       52.4       1.2  
Consolidated net sales and operating revenues
  $ 4,472.7       100.0 %   $ 4,276.0       100.0 %   $ 4,224.5       100.0 %

(1)
The sales decrease from 2009 to 2010 in the accessory platform includes a decrease in sales of digital converter boxes. Consolidated sales of converter boxes were $33.7 million and $170.1 million in 2010 and 2009, respectively.
(2)
Other sales include outside sales from repair services and outside sales of our global sourcing operations and domestic and overseas manufacturing facilities.

 

 
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U.S. RadioShack Company-Operated Stores Segment
 
The following table provides a summary of our net sales and operating revenues by platform and as a percent of net sales and operating revenues for the U.S. RadioShack company-operated stores segment.
 
   
Net Sales and Operating Revenues
 
   
Year Ended December 31,
 
(In millions)
 
2010
   
2009
 
2008
     
Wireless
  $ 1,784.0       46.8 %   $ 1,342.1       36.8 %   $ 1,070.7       29.7 %
Accessory
    773.6       20.3       946.0       25.9       1,054.0       29.2  
Modern home
    421.3       11.1       489.8       13.4       483.7       13.4  
Personal electronics
    337.0       8.9       391.1       10.7       503.9       14.0  
Power
    198.9       5.2       204.7       5.6       227.3       6.3  
Technical
    164.6       4.3       167.3       4.6       170.9       4.7  
Service
    117.6       3.1       107.6       2.9       91.4       2.5  
Other
    11.2       0.3       2.3       0.1       9.2       0.2  
Net sales and operating revenues
  $ 3,808.2       100.0 %   $ 3,650.9       100.0 %   $ 3,611.1       100.0 %

 
Sales in our wireless platform (includes postpaid and prepaid wireless handsets, commissions, residual income and communication devices such as scanners and GPS products) increased 32.9% in 2010. This sales increase was driven by increased sales in our Sprint and AT&T postpaid wireless business and increased sales of prepaid wireless handsets. These increases were partially offset by decreased sales of GPS products. The inclusion of T-Mobile as a postpaid wireless carrier increased sales for the first nine months of 2010; however, T-Mobile sales decreased in the fourth quarter, when compared to the same period last year.
 
Sales in our accessory platform (includes home entertainment, wireless, music, computer and video game accessories; media storage; power adapters; digital imaging products and headphones) decreased 18.2% in 2010. This sales decrease was primarily driven by decreased sales of digital converter boxes and television antennas, but was partially offset by increased sales of wireless accessories. Consolidated sales of converter boxes were $33.7 million and $170.1 million in 2010 and 2009, respectively. Converter box sales have decreased since the transition to digital television occurred in June 2009. We expect sales of converter boxes to be minimal in 2011.
 
Sales in our modern home platform (includes home audio and video end-products, personal computing products, and residential telephones) decreased 14.0% in 2010. This decrease was driven primarily by decreased sales of digital televisions and netbooks, but was partially offset by increased sales of laptops.
 
Sales in our personal electronics platform (includes digital cameras, digital music players, toys, satellite radios, video gaming hardware, camcorders, and general radios) decreased 13.8% in 2010. This decrease was driven by sales declines in substantially all categories in this platform.
 
Sales in our power platform (includes general and special purpose batteries and battery chargers) decreased 2.8% in 2010. This decrease was primarily driven by decreased sales of both general and special purpose batteries, but was partially offset by increased sales of battery chargers.
 
Sales in our technical platform (includes wire and cable, connectivity products, components and tools, and hobby products) decreased 1.6% in 2010. This decrease was driven by decreased sales of connectivity products.
 
Sales in our service platform (includes prepaid wireless airtime, extended service plans, and bill payment revenue) increased 9.3% in 2010. This increase was driven primarily by increased sales of prepaid wireless airtime.
 
Kiosks Segment
 
Kiosk sales consist primarily of handset sales, postpaid and prepaid commission revenue and related wireless accessory sales. Kiosk sales increased 8.6% or $21.6 million in 2010. This increase was driven primarily by new sales in our Target kiosks and increased sales in our Sam’s Club kiosks, but was partially offset by the closure of our Sprint-branded kiosk business. We closed our Sprint-branded kiosks in the third quarter of 2009.
 
As previously disclosed, in February 2009 we signed a contract extension with Sam’s Club through March 31, 2011, with a transition period ending June 30, 2011, to continue operating wireless kiosks in certain Sam’s Club stores. As of December 31, 2010, we operated 417 of these kiosks. Accordingly, this transition will begin on April 1, 2011, and conclude on June 30, 2011, with the assignment to Sam’s Club of all kiosks operated by the Company in Sam’s Club stores.
 

 
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Other Sales
 
Other sales include sales to our independent dealers, outside sales through our service centers, sales generated by our www.radioshack.com website and our Mexican subsidiary, sales to commercial customers, and outside sales of our global sourcing operations and manufacturing. Other sales increased $17.8 million or 4.7% in 2010. This sales increase was driven primarily by increased sales at our Mexican subsidiary and increased sales to our independent dealers, but was partially offset by decreased sales from www.radioshack.com and our global sourcing and manufacturing operations. Our Mexican subsidiary accounted for less than 5% of consolidated net sales and operating revenues in 2010.
 
Gross Profit
Consolidated gross profit and gross margin are as follows:
   
Year Ended December 31,
 
(In millions)
 
2010
   
2009
   
2008
 
Gross profit
  $ 2,010.6     $ 1,962.5     $ 1,922.7  
Gross profit increase (decrease)
    2.5 %     2.1 %     (5.1 %)
                         
Gross margin
    45.0 %     45.9 %     45.5 %

Consolidated gross profit and gross margin for 2010 were $2,010.6 million and 45.0%, respectively, compared with $1,962.5 million and 45.9%, respectively, in 2009, resulting in a 2.5% increase in gross profit dollars and a 90 basis point decrease in our gross margin.
 
The increase in gross profit dollars was primarily due to increased sales, but was partially offset by decreased gross margin. Gross margin declined primarily due to a higher sales mix of lower margin wireless handsets and incremental promotional and clearance markdowns associated with seasonal sell-through and product transitions in non-wireless platforms.
 
Selling, General and Administrative Expense
Our consolidated SG&A expense increased 3.1% or $46.8 million in 2010. This represents a 50 basis point decrease as a percentage of net sales and operating revenues compared to 2009.
 
The table below summarizes the breakdown of various components of our consolidated SG&A expense and its related percentage of total net sales and operating revenues.
 
   
Year Ended December 31,
 
   
2010
   
2009
   
2008
 
   
 
Dollars
   
% of
Sales &
Revenues
   
 
Dollars
   
% of
Sales &
Revenues
   
 
Dollars
   
% of
Sales &
Revenues
 
 
(In millions)
Compensation
  $ 700.6       15.7 %   $ 655.7       15.3 %   $ 617.5       14.6 %
Rent and occupancy
    288.3       6.4       289.7       6.8       292.6       6.9  
Advertising
    206.1       4.6       193.0       4.5       214.5       5.1  
Other taxes (excludes income taxes)
    101.8       2.3       102.0       2.4       87.9       2.1  
Utilities
    54.7       1.2       55.3       1.3       58.7       1.4  
Insurance
    48.8       1.1       47.5       1.1       55.0       1.3  
Credit card fees
    35.6       0.8       37.7       0.9       37.7       0.9  
Professional fees
    21.4       0.5       23.9       0.6       23.7       0.6  
Repairs and maintenance
    20.2       0.5       22.3       0.5       19.5       0.5  
Licenses
    13.2       0.3       11.5       0.3       12.4       0.3  
Printing, postage and office supplies
    7.5       0.2       8.1       0.2       8.1       0.2  
Matching contributions to savings plans
    5.6       0.1       6.0       0.1       6.5       0.2  
Recruiting, training & employee relations
    5.7       0.1       6.0       0.1       7.5       0.2  
Travel
    5.4       0.1       4.6       0.1       5.4       0.1  
Warranty and product repair
    2.2       --       2.7       0.1       4.2       0.1  
Other
    37.6       0.9       41.9       1.0       58.6       1.2  
                                                 
    $ 1,554.7       34.8 %   $ 1,507.9       35.3 %   $ 1,509.8       35.7 %
 

 
24

 

Compensation expense increased in dollars and as a percentage of net sales and operating revenues. This increase was driven by incentive compensation paid on increased wireless sales and the hiring of additional employees to support our Target kiosk locations.
 
Advertising expense was higher in 2010 primarily due to incremental advertising related to brand building in the second quarter of 2010.
 
Depreciation and Amortization
The table below provides a summary of our total depreciation and amortization by segment.
   
Year Ended December 31,
 
(In millions)
 
2010
   
2009
   
2008
 
U.S. RadioShack company-operated stores
  $ 45.4     $ 45.8     $ 52.9  
Kiosks
    2.3       3.2       5.8  
Other
    3.7       5.8       1.8  
Unallocated
    32.8       38.1       38.6  
Total depreciation and amortization
  $ 84.2     $ 92.9     $ 99.1  

The table below provides an analysis of total depreciation and amortization.
   
Year Ended December 31,
 
(In millions)
 
2010
   
2009
   
2008
 
Depreciation and amortization expense
  $ 76.5     $ 83.7     $ 87.9  
Depreciation and amortization included in cost of products sold
      7.7         9.2         11.2  
Total depreciation and amortization
  $ 84.2     $ 92.9     $ 99.1  

Total depreciation and amortization for 2010 declined $8.7 million or 9.4%. Our depreciation expense has been trending lower over the past five years due to our lower level of capital expenditures during this time compared with a higher level of capital expenditures in 2005 and prior years.
 
Impairment of Long-Lived Assets
Impairment of long-lived assets was $4.0 million and $1.5 million in 2010 and 2009, respectively. In 2010, this amount was related primarily to underperforming U.S. RadioShack company-operated stores and certain test store formats. In 2009, these amounts were related primarily to underperforming U.S. RadioShack company-operated stores and kiosk locations.
 
Net Interest Expense
Consolidated net interest expense, which is interest expense net of interest income, was $ 39.3 million in both 2010 and 2009.
 
In 2010, interest expense primarily consisted of interest paid at the stated coupon rate on our outstanding notes, the non-cash amortization of the discount on our convertible notes, cash received on our interest rate swaps, and the non-cash change in fair value of our interest rate swaps. Interest expense decreased $2.2 million in 2010. This decrease was primarily driven by the reduced principal balance of our long-term notes due in May 2011 resulting from the September 2009 repurchase of $43.2 million of the principal amount of our notes and increased payments received on our interest rate swap contracts during 2010. Non-cash interest expense was $15.2 million in 2010 compared with $13.7 million in 2009.
 
Interest income decreased $2.2 million in 2010. This decrease was primarily due to lower average cash balances in the second half of 2010.
 
Income Tax Expense
Our effective tax rate for 2010 was 38.7%, compared with 37.6% for 2009. The 2010 effective tax rate was affected by the net reversal of approximately $1.2 million in previously unrecognized tax benefits, deferred tax assets and accrued interest due to the effective settlement of state income tax matters during the period. These discrete items lowered the effective tax rate by 0.4 percentage points.
 
The 2009 effective tax rate was affected by the net reversal of approximately $6.1 million in previously unrecognized tax benefits, deferred tax assets and accrued interest due to the effective settlement of state income tax matters during the period. These discrete items lowered the effective tax rate by 1.9 percentage points.
 
 
2009 COMPARED WITH 2008
 
Net Sales and Operating Revenues
Consolidated net sales increased 1.2% or $51.5 million to $4,276.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2009, compared with $4,224.5 million in 2008. This increase was primarily due to a comparable store sales increase of 1.3% in 2009. The increase in comparable store sales was driven primarily by increased sales in our wireless and modern home platforms, but was partially offset by decreased sales in our accessory and personal electronics platforms.
 
U.S. RadioShack Company-Operated Stores Segment
 
Sales in our wireless platform increased 25.3% in 2009. This sales increase was driven by increased sales in our Sprint postpaid wireless business, the addition of T-Mobile as a postpaid wireless carrier, and increased sales of prepaid wireless handsets. These increases were partially offset by decreased sales of GPS products.
 
Sales in our accessory platform decreased 10.2% in 2009. This sales decrease was primarily driven by decreased
 

 
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sales in digital-to-analog converter boxes, wireless accessories, imaging accessories, and media storage, but was partially offset by increased sales of television antennas. Consolidated sales of converter boxes were $170.1 million and $204.8 million in 2009 and 2008, respectively. The decrease in converter box sales occurred in the second half of the year after the transition to digital television occurred in June 2009.
 
Sales in our modern home platform increased 1.3% in 2009. In this platform we recorded sales gains in netbooks, digital televisions, and VoIP products, which were substantially offset by sales declines in laptops, residential telephones, and DVD players.
 
Sales in our personal electronics platform decreased 22.4% in 2009. This decrease was driven primarily by sales declines in digital cameras, digital music players, video game consoles, satellite radios, and toys.
 
Sales in our power platform decreased 9.9% in 2009. This decrease was primarily driven by decreased sales of both general and special purpose batteries. Our sales performance in this platform was negatively affected by the disruption during the transition process of the assortment to our Enercell brand.
 
Sales in our technical platform decreased 2.1% in 2009. We recorded an increase in sales of wire and cable products, which was more than offset by decreased sales across most of the other product categories in this platform.
 
Sales in our service platform increased 17.7% in 2009. This increase was driven primarily by increased sales of prepaid wireless airtime and extended service plans.
 
Kiosks Segment
 
Kiosk sales decreased 11.8% or $33.5 million in 2009. We realized a sales increase in our Sam’s Club business, which was offset by a reduced number of kiosk locations. This decrease in locations was partially due to the closure of underperforming Sprint-branded kiosk locations in the first half of 2009 and the closure of the remainder of our Sprint-branded kiosks in the third quarter. For more information regarding the reduction in kiosk outlets, see the Retail Locations table in Item 2 – “Properties” in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
 
Other Sales
Other sales increased $45.2 million or 13.7% in 2009. This sales increase was primarily attributable to the consolidation of our Mexican subsidiary for all of 2009, but was partially offset by decreased sales to our independent dealers. Our Mexican subsidiary accounted for less than 5% of consolidated net sales and operating revenues in 2009.
 
Gross Profit
Consolidated gross profit and gross margin for 2009 were $1,962.5 million and 45.9%, respectively, compared with $1,922.7 million and 45.5% in 2008, resulting in a 2.1% increase in gross profit dollars and a 40 basis point increase in our gross margin.
 
The improvement in gross margin was partially driven by improved product mix, combined with fewer markdowns as a result of more effective promotional productivity, inventory management and higher sell-through of seasonal products.
 
Selling, General and Administrative Expense
Our consolidated SG&A expense decreased 0.1% or $1.9 million in 2009. This represents a 40 basis point decrease as a percentage of net sales and operating revenues compared to 2008.
 
Compensation expense increased in dollars and as a percentage of net sales and operating revenues. This increase was driven by more incentive compensation and the consolidation of our Mexican subsidiary for all of 2009.
 
Total rent and occupancy expense decreased from 2008. This decrease was primarily driven by reduced rent related to our amended headquarters lease and the closing of our Sprint-branded kiosks. These decreases were partially offset by the consolidation of our Mexican subsidiary for all of 2009.
 
Advertising expense decreased in 2009 primarily due to reduced spending in the second quarter of the year. While our advertising expense in the second half of the year was consistent with the same period last year, we shifted a significant portion of our advertising expenditures from product specific promotional activities to building awareness of our new brand creative platform, The Shack®.
 
The increase in other taxes was partially driven by increased payroll taxes associated with increased compensation expense. Additionally, we recorded an $8.2 million sales and use tax benefit from the settlement of a sales tax issue in 2008.
 
Our insurance expense has decreased in recent years due to lower workers’ compensation costs. This has been the result of better claims experience during this time.
 
The decrease in other SG&A expense was primarily due to a $12.1 million non-cash charge recorded in connection with our amended headquarters lease in 2008.
 
Depreciation and Amortization
Total depreciation and amortization for 2009 declined $6.2 million or 6.3%. This decrease was primarily due to reduced capital expenditures in recent years when compared with prior years.
 

 
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Impairment of Long-Lived Assets
Impairment of long-lived assets was $1.5 million and $2.8 million for 2009 and 2008, respectively. These amounts were related primarily to underperforming U.S. RadioShack company-operated stores and kiosk locations.
 
Net Interest Expense
Consolidated net interest expense, which is interest expense net of interest income, was $39.3 million for 2009 compared with $20.3 million for 2008.
 
Interest expense primarily consists of interest paid on the stated coupon rate for our outstanding bonds, the non-cash amortization of discounts and premiums on our outstanding bonds, cash paid or received on our interest rate swaps, and the non-cash change in fair value of our interest rate swaps in 2009. Interest expense increased $9.2 million in 2009. This increase was primarily driven by increased interest expense related to our 2013 convertible notes. These notes were outstanding for twelve months in 2009 and four months in 2008. This increase was partially offset by increased payments received on our interest rate swap contracts in 2009 and the repurchase of $43.2 million of our notes due in May 2011. Non-cash interest expense was $13.7 million in 2009 compared with $5.0 million in 2008.
 
Interest income decreased $9.8 million in 2009. This decrease was due to a lower interest rate environment in 2009, but was partially offset by larger average cash balances in 2009.
 
Other Loss
During 2009 we recorded other loss of $1.6 million compared with other loss of $2.4 million in 2008. The 2009 loss was recognized in conjunction with the repurchase of a portion of our 2011 Notes. The 2008 loss represented losses related to our derivative exposure to Sirius XM Radio, Inc. warrants as a result of our fair value measurements of these warrants. At December 31, 2008, the fair value of these warrants was zero, and these warrants expired in the first quarter of 2009.
 
Income Tax Expense
Our effective tax rate for 2009 was 37.6% compared with 36.8% for 2008. The 2009 effective tax rate was affected by the net reversal of approximately $6.1 million in previously unrecognized tax benefits, deferred tax assets and accrued interest due to the effective settlement of state income tax matters during the period. These discrete items lowered the effective tax rate by 1.9 percentage points.
 
The 2008 effective tax rate was affected by the execution of a closing agreement with respect to a Puerto Rico income tax matter during the year, which resulted in a credit to income tax expense; this discrete item lowered the effective tax rate for 2008 by 1.0 percentage point. In addition, the 2008 effective tax rate was affected by the net reversal of approximately $4.1 million in unrecognized tax benefits, deferred tax assets and accrued interest related to the settlement of various state income tax matters and the expiration of the statute of limitations with respect to our 2002 taxable year; this net reversal lowered the effective tax rate for 2008 by 1.4 percentage points.
 
 
RECENTLY ISSUED ACCOUNTING PRONOUNCEMENTS
Refer to Note 2 – “Summary of Significant Accounting Policies” under the section titled “New Accounting Standards” in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.
 
 
LIQUIDITY AND CAPITAL RESOURCES
 
Cash Flow Overview
 
Operating Activities: Cash provided by operating activities in 2010 was $155.0 million, compared with $245.8 million in 2009. Cash flows from operating activities are comprised of net income plus non-cash adjustments to net income and working capital components. Cash provided by net income plus non-cash adjustments to net income was $343.9 million and $333.7 million in 2010 and 2009, respectively. Cash used in working capital components was $188.9 million and $87.9 million in 2010 and 2009, respectively. Our cash used in working capital components in 2010 was driven by higher accounts receivable and inventory balances to support our increased wireless business and our Target kiosk expansion. Cash used in working capital components in 2010 was also driven by lower accrued expenses and current liabilities related to insurance, legal reserves and compensation.
 
Investing Activities: Cash used in investing activities was $80.0 million and $80.8 million in 2010 and 2009, respectively. Capital expenditures of $80.1 million in 2010 were consistent with last year. Capital expenditures primarily related to information system projects, Target Mobile kiosks, and our U.S. RadioShack company-operated stores.
 
Financing Activities: Net cash used in financing activities was $413.8 million in 2010 compared with $71.6 million in 2009. This increase was primarily driven by the repurchase of $398.8 million of our common stock in 2010 under our share repurchase program, compared with no repurchases in 2009.
 
Free Cash Flow: Our free cash flow, defined as cash flows from operating activities less dividends paid and additions to property, plant and equipment, was $48.4 million in 2010, $133.5 million in 2009, and $157.7 million in 2008. The decrease in free cash flow for 2010 was attributable to decreased cash flow from operating activities as described above.
 

 
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We believe free cash flow is a relevant indicator of our ability to repay maturing debt, change dividend payments or fund other uses of capital that management believes will enhance shareholder value. The comparable financial measure to free cash flow under generally accepted accounting principles is cash flows from operating activities, which was $155.0 million in 2010, $245.8 million in 2009, and $274.6 million in 2008. We do not intend for the presentation of free cash flow, a non-GAAP financial measure, to be considered in isolation or as a substitute for measures prepared in accordance with GAAP, nor do we intend to imply that free cash flow represents cash flow available for discretionary expenditures.
 
The following table is a reconciliation of cash flows from operating activities to free cash flow.
   
Year Ended December 31,
 
(In millions)
 
2010
   
2009
   
2008
 
Net cash provided by operating activities
  $ 155.0     $ 245.8     $ 274.6  
Less:
                       
Additions to property, plant and equipment
    80.1       81.0       85.6  
Dividends paid
    26.5       31.3       31.3  
                         
Free cash flow
  $ 48.4     $ 133.5     $ 157.7  
 
SOURCES OF LIQUIDITY
As of December 31, 2010, we had $569.4 million in cash and cash equivalents. We believe that our cash flows from operations and available cash and cash equivalents will adequately fund our operations, our capital expenditures, and our maturing debt obligations. Additionally, we had a credit facility of $325 million.
 
On January 4, 2011, we terminated this credit facility and entered into a new five-year, $450 million revolving credit agreement (“2016 Credit Facility”) with a group of lenders with Bank of America, N.A., as administrative agent.
 
As a condition of the 2016 Credit Facility, we were required to eliminate the restrictive covenants associated with our long-term notes due May 15, 2011 (as further defined below, the “2011 Notes”). On January 4, 2011, we transferred $318.1 million to the trustee for the 2011 Notes that will be used to pay principal and interest amounts due upon redemption of these notes. In connection with the deposit of these funds, the trustee acknowledged the satisfaction and discharge of the indenture as to the 2011 Notes, which had the effect of eliminating the restrictive covenants referred to above. This redemption is currently scheduled to take place on March 4, 2011. Any amounts remaining with the trustee after the redemption of the 2011 Notes will be returned to us.
 

The table below lists our credit commitments from various financial institutions at December 31, 2010.
 
(In millions)
 
Commitment Expiration per Period
 
 
Credit Commitments
 
Total Amounts Committed
   
Less Than
1 Year
   
1-3 Years
   
3-5 Years
   
Over
5 Years
 
Lines of credit (1)
  $ 325.0     $ 325.0     $ --     $ --     $ --  
Standby letters of credit
    --       --       --       --       --  
Total commercial commitments
  $ 325.0     $ 325.0     $ --     $ --     $ --  
 
(1)
On January 4, 2011, we replaced this credit facility with a new five-year, $450 million credit facility. See the “Available Financing” section below for more information.
 
 
Available Financing: As of December 31, 2010, we had $292.3 million in borrowing capacity available under our existing credit facility. We did not borrow under this facility during 2010, but we did arrange for the issuance of standby letters of credit totaling $32.7 million under the facility. This credit facility had customary terms and covenants, and we were in compliance with these covenants at December 31, 2010. The facility was scheduled to expire in May of 2011.
 
The 2016 Credit Facility expires on January 4, 2016. The new facility may be used for general corporate purposes and the issuance of letters of credit. The new facility is secured by substantially all of the Company’s inventory, accounts receivable, cash and cash equivalents, and certain other personal property.
 
Borrowings under the 2016 Credit Facility are subject to a borrowing base of certain secured assets and bear interest, at our option, at a bank’s prime rate plus 1.25% to 1.75% or LIBOR plus 2.25% to 2.75%. The applicable rates in these ranges are based on the aggregate average availability under the facility.
 
The 2016 Credit Facility also contains a $150 million sub-limit for the issuance of standby and commercial letters of credit. Issued letters of credit will reduce the amount available under the facility. Letter of credit fees are 2.25%
 

 
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to 2.75% for standby letters of credit or 1.125% to 1.375% for commercial letters of credit.
 
We pay commitment fees to the lenders at an annual rate of 0.50% of the unused amount of the facility. No borrowings, other than the issuance of letters of credit totaling $32.8 million as of February 15, 2011, have been made under the 2016 Credit Facility.
 
The 2016 Credit Facility contains affirmative and negative covenants that, among other things, restrict certain payments, including dividends and share repurchases. Also, we will be subject to a minimum consolidated fixed charge coverage ratio if our unused amount under the facility is less than the greater of 12.5% of the maximum borrowing amount and $45.0 million.
 
We are generally free to pay dividends and repurchase shares as long as the current and projected unused amount under the facility is greater than 17.5% of the maximum borrowing amount and the minimum consolidated fixed charge coverage ratio is maintained. We may pay dividends and repurchase shares without regard to the Company's consolidated fixed charge coverage ratio as long as the current and projected unused amount under the facility is greater than 75% of the maximum borrowing amount and cash on hand is used for the dividends or share repurchases.
 
 
CASH REQUIREMENTS
 
Capital Expenditures: We anticipate that our capital expenditure requirements for 2011 will range from $100 million to $125 million. The nature of our capital expenditures is comprised of a base level of investment required to support our current operations and a discretionary amount related to our strategic initiatives. The base level of capital expenditures required to support our operations ranges from $40 million to $60 million. The remaining amount of anticipated capital expenditures relates to strategic initiatives as reflected in our annual plan. These capital expenditures are discretionary and, therefore, may not be spent if we decide not to pursue one or more of our strategic initiatives. U.S. RadioShack company-operated store remodels and relocations, Target kiosks, and information systems projects will account for the majority of our anticipated 2011 capital expenditures. Cash and cash equivalents and cash generated from operating activities will be used to fund future capital expenditure needs.
 
Seasonal Inventory Buildup: Typically, our annual cash requirements for pre-seasonal inventory buildup range between $150 million and $250 million. The funding required for this buildup comes primarily from cash on hand and cash generated from net sales and operating revenues. Additionally, our 2016 Credit Facility could be utilized to fund the inventory buildup.
 
Contractual Obligations
The table below contains our known contractual commitments as of December 31, 2010.
 
(In millions)
 
Payments Due by Period
 
 
Contractual Obligations
 
Total Amounts Committed
   
Less Than
1 Year
   
1-3 Years
   
3-5 Years
   
Over
5 Years
 
Long-term debt obligations (1)
  $ 682.8     $ 306.8     $ 375.0     $ 1.0     $ --  
Interest obligations
    32.7       17.8       14.9       --       --  
Operating lease obligations (2)
    562.9       196.7       233.8       99.2       33.2  
Purchase obligations (3)
    291.8       268.4       19.4       4.0       --  
Other long-term liabilities reflected on the balance sheet (4)
    93.0               27.6       6.5       22.3  
Total
  $ 1,663.2     $ 789.7     $ 670.7     $ 110.7     $ 55.5  
 
(1)
For more information regarding long-term debt, refer to Note 5 – “Indebtedness and Borrowing Facilities” of our Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements included elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
(2)
For more information regarding lease commitments, refer to Note 13 – “Commitments and Contingencies” of our Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements included elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
(3)
Purchase obligations include our product commitments, marketing agreements and freight commitments.
(4)
Includes a $36.6 million liability for unrecognized tax benefits. We are not able to reasonably estimate the timing of the payments or the amount by which the liability will increase or decrease over time; therefore, the related balances have not been reflected in the ‘‘Payments Due by Period’’ section of the table.


 
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2013 Convertible Notes: In August 2008, we issued $375 million principal amount of convertible senior notes due August 1, 2013 (the “2013 Convertible Notes”), in a private offering. Each $1,000 of principal of the 2013 Convertible Notes is initially convertible, under certain circumstances, into 41.2414 shares of our common stock (or a total of approximately 15.5 million shares), which is the equivalent of $24.25 per share, subject to adjustment upon the occurrence of specified events set forth under terms of the 2013 Convertible Notes. Upon conversion, we would pay the holder the cash value of the applicable number of shares of our common stock, up to the principal amount of the note. Amounts in excess of the principal amount, if any, (the “excess conversion value”) may be paid in cash or in stock, at our option. Holders may convert their 2013 Convertible Notes into common stock on the net settlement basis described above at any time from May 1, 2013, until the close of business on July 29, 2013, or if, and only if, one of the following conditions has been met:
 
·  
During any calendar quarter, and only during such calendar quarter, in which the closing price of our common stock for at least 20 trading days in the period of 30 consecutive trading days ending on the last trading day of the preceding calendar quarter exceeds 130% of the conversion price per share of common stock in effect on the last day of such preceding calendar quarter
 
·  
During the five consecutive business days immediately after any 10 consecutive trading day period in which the average trading price per $1,000 principal amount of 2013 Convertible Notes was less than 98% of the product of the closing price of the common stock on such date and the conversion rate on such date
 
·  
We make specified distributions to holders of our common stock or specified corporate transactions occur
 
The 2013 Convertible Notes were not convertible at the holders' option at any time during 2010 or 2009.
 
Holders who convert their 2013 Convertible Notes in connection with a change in control may be entitled to a make-whole premium in the form of an increase in the conversion rate. In addition, upon a change in control, liquidation, dissolution or delisting, the holders of the 2013 Convertible Notes may require us to repurchase for cash all or any portion of their 2013 Convertible Notes for 100% of the principal amount of the notes plus accrued and unpaid interest, if any. As of December 31, 2010, none of the conditions allowing holders of the 2013 Convertible Notes to convert or requiring us to repurchase the 2013 Convertible Notes had been met.
 
Concurrent with the issuance of the 2013 Convertible Notes, we entered into note hedge transactions with Citigroup and Bank of America whereby we have the option to purchase up to 15.5 million shares of our common stock at a price of $24.25 per share (the “Convertible Note Hedges”), and we sold warrants to the same financial institutions whereby they have the option to purchase up to 15.5 million shares of our common stock at a per share price of $36.60 (the “Warrants”). The Convertible Note Hedges and Warrants were structured to reduce the potential future share dilution associated with the conversion of the 2013 Convertible Notes. The Convertible Note Hedges and Warrants are separate contracts with the two financial institutions, are not part of the terms of the 2013 Convertible Notes, and do not affect the rights of holders under the 2013 Convertible Notes. A holder of the 2013 Convertible Notes does not have any rights with respect to the Convertible Note Hedges or Warrants.
 
The net proceeds retained by RadioShack as a result of the issuance of the 2013 Convertible Notes, the purchase of the Convertible Note Hedges, and the proceeds received from the issuance of the Warrants were approximately $319.2 million. We completed these transactions to secure a source of liquidity prior to the June 2009 expiration of our $300 million credit facility. On September 11, 2008, we terminated this credit facility.
 
For a more detailed description of the 2013 Convertible Notes, Convertible Note Hedges and Warrants, please see Note 5 – “Indebtedness and Borrowing Facilities” and Note 6 – “Stockholders’ Equity” in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.
 
Long-Term Notes: On May 11, 2001, we issued $350 million of 10-year 7.375% notes due May 15, 2011, (the “2011 Notes”) in a private offering to qualified institutional buyers under SEC Rule 144A. In August 2001, under the terms of an exchange offering filed with the SEC, we exchanged substantially all of these notes for a similar amount of publicly registered notes. The exchange resulted in substantially all of the notes becoming registered with the SEC and did not result in additional debt being issued. The annual interest rate on the notes is 7.375% per annum with interest payable on November 15 and May 15 of each year. The notes contain certain non-financial covenants.
 
In June and August 2003, we entered into interest rate swap agreements with underlying notional amounts of debt of $100 million and $50 million, respectively, and both with maturities in May 2011. Our counterparty for these swaps is Citigroup. These swaps effectively convert a portion of our long-term fixed rate debt to a variable rate. For more information regarding our interest rate swaps, refer to Note 11 – “Derivative Financial Instruments” in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.
 

 
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In September 2009, we completed a tender offer to purchase for cash any and all of these notes. Upon expiration of the offer, $43.2 million of the aggregate outstanding principal amount of the notes was validly tendered and accepted. We paid a total of $46.6 million, which consisted of the purchase price of $45.4 million for the tendered notes plus $1.2 million in accrued and unpaid interest, to the holders of the tendered notes.
 
On January 4, 2011, we announced our intention to redeem any and all outstanding 2011 Notes on March 4, 2011. See Note 15 - “Subsequent Events” in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for more information.
 
Operating Leases: We use operating leases, primarily for our retail locations and our corporate campus, to lower our capital requirements.
 
Continuing Lease Obligations: We have obligations under retail leases for locations that we assigned to other businesses. The majority of these lease obligations arose from leases for which CompUSA Inc. (“CompUSA”) assumed responsibility as part of its purchase of our Computer City, Inc. subsidiary in August 1998. Because the company that assumed responsibility for these leases has ceased operations, we may be responsible for rent due under the leases.
 
Following an announcement by CompUSA in February 2007 of its intention to close as many as 126 stores and an announcement in December 2007 that it had been acquired by Gordon Brothers Group, CompUSA’s stores ceased operations in January 2008. We may be responsible for rent due on a portion of the leases that relate to the closed stores. As of February 3, 2011, we had been named as a defendant in a total of 13 lawsuits from lessors seeking payment from us, 12 of which have been resolved.
 
Based on all available information pertaining to the status of these lawsuits, and after applying the Financial Accounting Standards Board’s (“FASB”) guidance on accounting for contingencies, the balance of our accrual for these obligations was $2.4 million and $6.2 million at December 31, 2010 and 2009, respectively. We will continue to monitor this situation for new information on outstanding litigation and settlements, but we do not consider the amounts of these obligations, both individually and in the aggregate, to be material to our results of operations or financial position.
 
Capitalization
The following table sets forth information about our capitalization on the dates indicated.
   
December 31,
 
   
2010
   
2009
 
 
(Dollars in millions)
 
Dollars
   
% of Total
Capitalization
   
Dollars
   
% of Total
Capitalization
 
Short-term debt
  $ 308.0       20.8 %   $ --       -- %
Long-term debt
    331.8       22.4       627.8       37.5  
Total debt
    639.8       43.2       627.8       37.5  
Stockholders’ equity
    842.5       56.8       1,048.3       62.5  
Total capitalization
  $ 1,482.3       100.0 %   $ 1,676.1       100.0 %

Our debt-to-total capitalization ratio increased in 2010 from 2009, primarily due to the repurchase of $398.8 million of our common stock in 2010.
 
Dividends: We have paid common stock cash dividends for 24 consecutive years. On November 4, 2010, our Board of Directors declared an annual dividend of $0.25 per share. The dividend was paid on December 16, 2010, to stockholders of record on November 26, 2010. The dividend payment of $26.5 million was funded from cash on hand.
 
Share Repurchases: In July 2008, our Board of Directors approved a share repurchase program with no expiration date authorizing management to repurchase up to $200 million of our common stock. During the third quarter of 2008, we repurchased 6.0 million shares or $110.0 million of our common stock under this program. As of December 31, 2008, $90.0 million was available for share repurchases under this program.
 
In August 2009, our Board of Directors approved a $200 million increase in this share repurchase program. As of December 31, 2009, $290 million of the total authorized amount was available for share repurchases under this program.
 
In August 2010, our Board of Directors approved an increase in this share repurchase program from $400 million to $610 million, with $500 million available for share repurchases under this program. In November 2010, we completed a $300 million accelerated share repurchase (“ASR”) program that we entered into in August 2010, which is further discussed below. We repurchased 14.9 million shares under the ASR program. In addition, after the conclusion of the ASR program, we repurchased $98.6 million worth of shares in the open market, representing 4.9 million shares. As of December 31, 2010, $101.4 million of the total authorized amount was available for share repurchases under this program.
 

 
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Accelerated Share Repurchase Program: As mentioned above, in August 2010, we entered into an accelerated share repurchase program with two investment banks to repurchase shares of our common stock under our approved share repurchase program. On August 24, 2010, we paid $300 million to the investment banks in exchange for an initial delivery of 11.7 million shares to us. At the conclusion of the ASR program, we received an additional 3.2 million shares. The 14.9 million shares delivered to us were based on the average daily volume weighted average price of our common stock over a period beginning immediately after the effective date of the ASR agreements and ending on November 2, 2010.
 
Treasury Stock Retirement: In December 2010, our Board of Directors approved the retirement of 45.0 million shares of our common stock held as treasury stock. These shares returned to the status of authorized and unissued.
 
 
OFF-BALANCE SHEET ARRANGEMENTS
Other than the operating leases described above, we do not have any off-balance sheet financing arrangements, transactions, or special purpose entities.
 
 
INFLATION
With the exception of increased energy costs in the first half of 2008, inflation has not significantly affected us over the past three years. We do not expect inflation to have a significant effect on our operations in the foreseeable future.
 
 
OTHER MATTERS
Separate from our wireless service provider settlement agreement in July 2010, we notified T-Mobile that they had breached their agreement with us. Under the agreement, T-Mobile has until March 21, 2011, to cure the breaches. In the event that T-Mobile is unable to cure the breaches, we have the right to terminate the agreement. The outcome of this action is uncertain and the ultimate resolution of this matter could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations, financial condition and business operations.
 
 
CRITICAL ACCOUNTING POLICIES AND ESTIMATES
Our consolidated financial statements are prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles (“GAAP”) in the United States. The application of GAAP requires us to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported values of assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements, the reported amount of revenues and expenses during the reporting period, and the related disclosures of contingent assets and liabilities. The use of estimates is pervasive throughout our financial statements and is affected by management’s judgment and uncertainties. Our estimates, assumptions and judgments are based on historical experience, current market trends and other factors that we believe to be relevant and reasonable at the time the consolidated financial statements are prepared. We continually evaluate the information used to make these estimates as our business and the economic environment change. Actual results may differ materially from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions.
 
In the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements, we describe the significant accounting policies used in the preparation of our consolidated financial statements. The accounting policies and estimates we consider most critical are revenue recognition; inventory valuation; estimation of reserves and valuation allowances specifically related to insurance, tax and legal contingencies; valuation of long-lived assets and intangibles, including goodwill; and stock-based compensation.
 
We consider an accounting policy or estimate to be critical if it requires difficult, subjective or complex judgments, and is material to the portrayal of our financial condition, changes in financial condition or results of operations. The selection, application and disclosure of our critical accounting policies and estimates have been reviewed by the Audit and Compliance Committee of our Board of Directors.
 
Revenue Recognition
 
Description
 
Our revenue is derived principally from the sale of name brand and private brand products and services to consumers. Revenue is recognized, net of an estimate for customer refunds and product returns, when persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, delivery has occurred or services have been rendered, the sales price is fixed or determinable, and collectability is reasonably assured.
 
Certain products, such as wireless telephone handsets, require the customer to use the services of a third-party service provider. The third-party service provider pays us an upfront commission for obtaining a new customer and, in some cases, a monthly recurring residual amount based upon the ongoing arrangement between the service provider and the customer. Our sale of an activated wireless telephone handset is the single event required to meet the delivery criterion for both the upfront commission and the recurring residual revenue. Upfront commission revenue, net of estimated wireless service deactivations, is generally recognized at the time an activated wireless telephone handset is sold to the customer at the point-of-sale. Recurring residual revenue is recognized as earned under the terms of each contract with the service provider, which is typically as the service provider bills its customer, generally on a monthly basis.
 

 
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Judgments and uncertainties involved in the estimate
 
Our revenue recognition accounting methodology requires us to make certain judgments regarding the estimate of future sales returns and wireless service deactivations. Our estimates for product refunds and returns, wireless service deactivations and commission revenue adjustments are based on historical information pertaining to these items. Based on our extensive history in selling activated wireless telephone handsets, we have been able to establish reliable estimates for wireless service deactivations. However, our estimates for wireless service deactivations can be affected by certain characteristics of and decisions made by our service providers. These factors include changes in the quality of their customer service, the quality and performance of their networks, their rate plan offerings, their policies regarding extensions of customer credit, and their wireless telephone handset product offerings. These factors add uncertainty to our estimates.
 
Effect if actual results differ from assumptions
 
We have not made any material changes in the methodology used to estimate sales returns or wireless service deactivations during the past three fiscal years. We continue to update our estimate for wireless service deactivations to reflect the most recently available information regarding the characteristics of and decisions made by our service providers discussed above. If actual results differ from our estimates due to these or various other factors, the amount of revenue recorded could be materially affected. A 10% difference in our reserves for the estimates noted above would have affected net sales and operating revenues by approximately $3.3 million in 2010.
 
Inventory Valuation
 
Description
 
Our inventory consists primarily of finished goods available for sale at our retail locations or within our distribution centers and is recorded at the lower of average cost (which approximates FIFO) or market. The cost components recorded within inventory are the vendor invoice cost and certain allocated freight, distribution, warehousing and other costs relating to merchandise acquisition required to bring the merchandise from the vendor to the location where it is offered for sale.
 
Judgments and uncertainties involved in the estimate
 
Typically, the market value of our inventory is higher than its aggregate cost. Determination of the market value may be very complex and, therefore, requires a high degree of judgment. In order for management to make the appropriate determination of market value, the following items are commonly considered: inventory turnover statistics, current selling prices, seasonality factors, consumer trends, competitive pricing, performance of similar products or accessories, planned promotional incentives, technological obsolescence, and estimated costs to sell or dispose of merchandise such as sales commissions.
 
If the estimated market value, calculated as the amount we expect to realize, net of estimated selling costs, from the ultimate sale or disposal of the inventory, is determined to be less than the recorded cost, we record a provision to reduce the carrying amount of the inventory item to its net realizable value.
 
Effect if actual results differ from assumptions
 
We have not made any material changes in the methodology used to establish our inventory valuation or the related reserves during the past three fiscal years, and we do not believe there is a reasonable likelihood that there will be a material change in the future estimates or assumptions we use to estimate our inventory valuation reserves. Differences between management estimates and actual performance and pricing of our merchandise could result in inventory valuations that differ from the amount recorded at the financial statement date and could also cause fluctuations in the amount of recorded cost of products sold. If our estimates regarding market value are inaccurate or changes in consumer demand affect certain products in an unforeseen manner, we may be exposed to material losses or gains in excess of our established valuation reserve. We believe that we have sufficient current and historical knowledge to record reasonable estimates for our inventory valuation reserves. However, it is possible that actual results could differ from recorded reserves.
 
Estimation of Reserves and Valuation Allowances for Self-Insurance, Income Taxes, and Litigation Contingencies
 
Description
 
The amount of liability we record for claims related to insurance, tax and legal contingencies requires us to make judgments about the amount of expenses that will ultimately be incurred. We are insured for certain losses related to workers' compensation, property and other liability claims, with deductibles up to $1.0 million per occurrence. This insurance coverage limits our exposure for any catastrophic claims that result in liability in excess of the deductible. We also have a self-insured health program administered by a third-party covering the majority of our employees that participate in our health insurance programs. We estimate the amount of our reserves for all insurance programs discussed above at the end of each reporting period. This estimate is based on historical claims experience, demographic factors, severity factors, and other factors we deem relevant.
 

 
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We are subject to periodic audits from multiple domestic and foreign tax authorities related to income tax, sales and use tax, personal property tax, and other forms of taxation. These audits examine our tax positions, timing of income and deductions, and allocation procedures across multiple jurisdictions. Our accounting for tax estimates and contingencies requires us to evaluate tax issues and establish reserves in our consolidated financial statements based on our estimate of current probable tax exposures. Depending on the nature of the tax issue, we could be subject to audit over several years; therefore, our estimated reserve balances might exist for multiple years before an issue is resolved by the taxing authority.
 
We are involved in legal proceedings and governmental inquiries associated with employment and other matters. Our accounting for legal contingencies requires us to estimate the probable losses in these matters. This estimate has been developed in consultation with in-house and outside legal counsel and is based upon a combination of litigation and settlement strategies.
 
Judgments and uncertainties involved in the estimate
 
Our liabilities for insurance, tax and legal contingencies contain uncertainties because we are required to make assumptions and to apply judgment to estimate the exposures associated with these items. We use our history and experience, as well as other specific circumstances surrounding these claims, in evaluating the amount of liability we should record. As additional information becomes available, we assess the potential liability related to our various claims and revise our estimates as appropriate. These revisions could materially affect our results of operations and financial position or liquidity.
 
Effect if actual results differ from assumptions
 
We have not made any material changes in the methodology used to estimate our insurance reserves during the past three fiscal years, and we do not believe there is a reasonable likelihood that there will be a material change in the future estimates or assumptions for these items. However, a 10% change in our insurance reserves at December 31, 2010, would have affected net income by approximately $4.3 million. As of December 31, 2010, actual losses had not exceeded our expectations. Additionally, for claims that exceed our deductible amount, we record a gross liability and corresponding receivable representing expected recoveries, since we are not legally relieved of our obligation to the claimant.
 
Although we believe that our insurance, tax and legal reserves are based on reasonable judgments and estimates, actual results could differ, which may expose us to material gains or losses in future periods. These actual results could materially affect our effective tax rate, earnings, deferred tax balances and cash flows in the period of resolution.
 
Valuation of Long-Lived Assets and Intangibles, including Goodwill
 
Description
 
Long-lived assets, such as property and equipment, are reviewed for impairment when events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount may not be recoverable, such as insufficient cash flows or plans to dispose of or sell long-lived assets before the end of their previously estimated useful lives. The carrying amount is considered not recoverable if it exceeds the sum of the undiscounted cash flows expected to result from the use and eventual disposition of the asset. If the carrying amount is not recoverable, we recognize an impairment loss equal to the amount by which the carrying amount exceeds fair value. We estimate fair value based on projected future discounted cash flows. Impairment losses, if any, are recorded in the period in which the impairment occurs. The carrying value of the asset is adjusted to the new carrying value, and any subsequent increases in fair value are not recorded. Additionally, if it is determined that the estimated remaining useful life of the asset should be decreased, the periodic depreciation expense is adjusted based on the new existing carrying value of the asset and the new remaining useful life. Our policy is to evaluate long-lived assets for impairment at a store level for retail operations.
 
We have acquired goodwill and other separately identifiable intangible assets related to business acquisitions. The original valuation of these intangible assets is based on estimates of future profitability, cash flows and other judgmental factors. Goodwill represents the excess of the purchase price over the fair value of net assets acquired. We review our goodwill and other intangible asset balances on an annual basis, during the fourth quarter, and whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate the carrying value of a reporting unit or an intangible asset might exceed their fair value. If the carrying amount of an intangible asset or a reporting unit exceeds its fair value, we recognize an impairment loss for this difference.
 
Judgments and uncertainties involved in the estimate
 
Our impairment loss calculations for long-lived assets contain uncertainties because they require us to apply judgment and estimates concerning future cash flows, strategic plans, useful lives and assumptions about market performance. We also apply judgment in the selection of a discount rate that reflects the risk inherent in our current business model.
 
Our impairment loss calculations for intangible assets and goodwill contain uncertainties because they require us to estimate fair values related to these assets. We estimate
 

 
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fair values based on various valuation techniques such as discounted cash flows and other comparable market analyses. These types of analyses contain uncertainties because they require us to make judgments and assumptions regarding future profitability, industry factors, planned strategic initiatives, discount rates and other factors.