UNITED STATES
                       SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
                              Washington, DC 20549

                                    FORM 10-Q

          [X]  Quarterly Report Pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the
               Securities Exchange Act of 1934

               For the quarterly period ended June 30, 2003.

                                       OR

          [ ]  Transition Report Pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the
               Securities Exchange Act of 1934

               For the transition period from ______ to ______

                          Commission file number 1-8641
                                     -------

                         COEUR D'ALENE MINES CORPORATION
                            -------------------------
             (Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

             Idaho                                       82-0109423
-------------------------------             ----------------------------------
(State or other jurisdiction of            (I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
 incorporation or organization)

          PO Box I,
        505 Front Ave.
     Coeur d'Alene, Idaho                                  83816
-------------------------------             ----------------------------------
    (Address of principal                                (Zip Code)
      executive offices)

                                 (208) 667-3511
         ---------------------------------------------------------------
              (Registrant's telephone number, including area code)

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required
to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during
the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was
required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing
requirements for the past 90 days:   YES   X      NO
                                         -----       -----

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is an accelerated filer (as
defined in Rule 12b-2 under the
Exchange Act).  YES   X     NO
                    -----      -----

Applicable only to corporate issuers: Indicate the number of shares outstanding
of each of Issuer's classes of common stock, as of the latest practicable date:
Common stock, par value $1.00, of which 178,657,151 shares were issued and
outstanding as of July 21, 2003.




                         COEUR D'ALENE MINES CORPORATION

                                      INDEX

                                                                            Page
                                                                            No.
                                                                            ----
PART I.   Financial Information

Item 1.   Financial Statements
          Consolidated Balance Sheets --                                      3
          June 30, 2003 and December 31, 2002

          Consolidated Statements of Operations and
          Comprehensive Loss --  Three and                                    5
          Six Months Ended June 30, 2003
          and 2002

          Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows --                            6
          Three and Six Months Ended June 30, 2003
          and 2002

          Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements                          7

Item 2.   Management's Discussion and Analysis of                            19
          Financial Condition and Results of Operations

Item 3.   Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about
          Market Risk                                                        41

Item 4.   Controls and Procedures                                            43

PART II.  Other Information

Item 2.   Changes in Securities and Use of Proceeds                          43

Item 4.   Submission of Matters to a Vote of Security Holders                43

Item 6.   Exhibits and Reports on Form 8-K                                   44

Signatures                                                                   45

Certifications of CEO and CFO


                                       2


                COEUR D'ALENE MINES CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
                           CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
                                   (Unaudited)

                                                    June 30,       December 31,
                                                      2003             2002
                                                   ----------      ------------
ASSETS                                                   (In Thousands)

CURRENT ASSETS
    Cash and cash equivalents                      $  19,527        $   9,093
    Short-term investments                               301              518
    Receivables and prepaid expenses, net              9,309            7,185
    Ore on leach pad                                  14,046           11,082
    Metal and other inventory                         15,365           14,846
                                                   ---------        ---------
                                                      58,548           42,724

PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT
    Property, plant and equipment                     80,154           76,194
    Less accumulated depreciation                    (50,957)         (49,531)
                                                   ---------        ---------
                                                      29,197           26,663

MINING PROPERTIES
    Operational mining properties                    109,574           92,149
    Less accumulated depletion                       (86,304)         (71,833)
                                                   ---------        ---------
                                                      23,270           20,316
    Non-producing and developmental properties        25,364           28,129
    Mineral interests                                 18,825           18,825
                                                   ---------        ---------
                                                      67,459           67,270

OTHER ASSETS
    Non-current ore on leach pad                      17,228           15,474
    Restricted investments                            15,006           13,108
    Debt issuance costs, net                           1,903            1,034
    Marketable securities                                522              915
    Other                                              5,950            5,900
                                                   ---------        ---------
                                                      40,609           36,431
                                                   ---------        ---------
         TOTAL ASSETS                              $ 195,813        $ 173,088
                                                   =========        =========


See notes to consolidated financial statements.


                                       3



                          COEUR D'ALENE MINES CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
                                     CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
                                             (Unaudited)


                                                                         June 30,       December 31,
                                                                           2003             2002
                                                                        ----------      ------------
                                                                               (In Thousands)
                                                                                   
LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY

CURRENT LIABILITIES
    Accounts payable                                                    $   5,545        $   5,962
    Accrued liabilities                                                     3,886            4,334
    Accrued interest payable                                                1,415            1,610
    Accrued salaries and wages                                              3,339            5,594
    Current portion of remediation costs                                    1,174              926
    13 3/8% Convertible Senior Subordinated Notes due December 2003         9,887           12,735
    6 3/8% Convertible Subordinated Debentures due January 2004             5,873             --
    Current portion of bank financing                                       6,617            4,918
                                                                        ---------        ---------
                                                                           37,736           36,079
LONG-TERM LIABILITIES
    6 3/8% Convertible Subordinated Debentures due January 2004              --             55,132
    7 1/4% Convertible Subordinated Debentures due October 2005             9,939           11,665
    9% Convertible Senior Subordinated Notes due February 2007,
     net of discount                                                       34,070             --
    Reclamation and mine closure                                           20,912           14,458
    Other long-term liabilities                                             8,094            8,456
                                                                        ---------        ---------
                                                                           73,015           89,711
COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES

SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY
    Common stock, par value $1.00 per share-authorized 250,000,000
     shares, issued 151,074,310 and 119,653,267 at June 30, 2003
     and December 31, 2002 (1,059,211 shares held in treasury)            151,074          119,653
    Additional paid in capital                                            463,238          420,863
    Accumulated deficit                                                  (514,842)        (479,207)
    Shares held in treasury                                               (13,190)         (13,190)
    Accumulated other comprehensive loss                                   (1,218)            (821)
                                                                        ---------        ---------
                                                                           85,062           47,298
                                                                        ---------        ---------
TOTAL LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY                              $ 195,813        $ 173,088
                                                                        =========        =========


See notes to consolidated financial statements.


                                                 4



                            CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS AND COMPREHENSIVE LOSS
                                  COEUR D'ALENE MINES CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES


                                                          Three Months ended June 30,      Six Months ended June 30,
                                                          ---------------------------      -------------------------
                                                              2003           2002              2003           2002
                                                          ------------   ------------       ----------     ----------
                                                                     (In Thousands, except per share data)

                                                                                               
REVENUES
Sales of metal                                             $  25,731      $  19,565         $  54,732      $  36,034
Interest and other                                               483          2,564               745          3,092
                                                           ---------      ---------         ---------      ---------
         Total revenues                                       26,214         22,129            55,477         39,126

COSTS and Expenses
Production                                                    19,013         16,262            36,891         34,276
Depreciation and depletion                                     4,679          3,533             9,698          5,411
Administrative and general                                     2,409          2,464             5,465          4,569
Exploration                                                    1,127            983             2,214          1,611
Pre-feasibility                                                  390            960               766          1,782
Interest                                                       2,015          5,447             4,023          9,848
Other holding costs                                              945            667             1,568          1,460
Loss on exchange and early retirement of debt                     81          2,668            28,188          2,920
                                                           ---------      ---------         ---------      ---------
         Total cost and expenses                              30,659         32,984            88,813         61,877
                                                           ---------      ---------         ---------      ---------

NET LOSS FROM CONTINUING OPERATIONS BEFORE TAXES AND
 CUMULATIVE EFFECT OF CHANGE IN ACCOUNTING PRINCIPLE          (4,445)       (10,855)          (33,336)       (22,751)
Income tax benefit                                              --             --                  (7)          --
                                                           ---------      ---------         ---------      ---------
NET LOSS BEFORE CUMULATIVE EFFECT IN CHANGE IN
 ACCOUNTING PRINCIPLE                                         (4,445)       (10,855)          (33,329)       (22,751)
Cumulative effect of change in accounting principle             --             --              (2,306)          --
                                                           ---------      ---------         ---------      ---------
Net loss                                                      (4,445)       (10,855)          (35,635)       (22,751)
Other comprehensive loss                                        (100)          (578)             (397)          (477)
                                                           ---------      ---------         ---------      ---------
COMPREHENSIVE LOSS                                         $  (4,545)     $ (11,433)        $ (36,032)     $ (23,228)
                                                           =========      =========         =========      =========

BASIC AND DILUTED LOSS PER SHARE:
Weighted average number of shares of common stock
 outstanding                                                 143,888         67,654           138,724         60,008
                                                           =========      =========         =========      =========

Net loss per common share before cumulative effect
 of change in accounting principle                         $   (0.03)     $   (0.16)        $   (0.24)     $   (0.38)
Cumulative effect of change in accounting principle             --             --               (0.02)          --
                                                           ---------      ---------         ---------      ---------
Net loss per common share                                  $   (0.03)     $   (0.16)        $   (0.26)     $   (0.38)
                                                           =========      =========         =========      =========


See notes to consolidated financial statements.


                                                         5



                                  COEUR D'ALENE MINES CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
                                        CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
                                  Three and Six Months Ended June 30, 2003 and 2002
                                                     (Unaudited)



                                                          Three Months ended June 30,      Six Months ended June 30,
                                                          ---------------------------      -------------------------
                                                              2003           2002              2003           2002
                                                          ------------   ------------       ----------     ----------
                                                                                  (In Thousands)

                                                                                               
CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES:
Net loss                                                   $  (4,445)     $ (10,855)        $ (35,635)     $ (22,751)
Add (deduct) non-cash items:
    Depreciation and depletion                                 4,679          3,533             9,698          5,411
    Loss on early retirement of debt                              81          2,920            28,188          2,920
    Non-cash interest expense                                      2          4,185             1,103          5,388
    Cumulative effect of change in accounting method            --             --               2,306           --
    Other charges                                                491            100               732            917
Changes in Operating Assets and Liabilities:
    Receivables                                                 (964)           864            (2,123)          (435)
    Inventories                                               (2,543)        (1,348)           (5,237)         1,374
    Accounts payable and accrued liabilities                    (292)           698            (3,369)         1,754
                                                           ---------      ---------         ---------      ---------
    CASH (USED IN) PROVIDED BY OPERATING ACTIVITIES           (2,991)            97            (4,337)        (5,422)

CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES:
    Purchases of short-term investments                      (32,203)          (782)          (72,953)          (782)
    Proceeds from sales of short-term investments             51,790          2,420            71,510          3,684
    Expenditures on mining assets                             (4,447)        (3,177)           (7,711)        (4,731)
    Other                                                        (37)           121               (87)           (16)
                                                           ---------      ---------         ---------      ---------
    CASH PROVIDED BY (USED IN) INVESTING ACTIVITIES           15,103         (1,418)           (9,241)        (1,845)

CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES:
    Retirement of debt                                       (22,392)        (9,427)          (22,392)        (9,427)
    Proceeds from issuance of  long-term debt,
      net of issuance costs                                     (270)        14,050            33,268         14,050
    Proceeds from issuance of common stock                    11,500           --              11,500           --
    Bank Borrowings on working capital facility                4,447           --              16,603           --
    Payments to Bank on working capital facility              (5,126)          --             (14,904)          --
    Other                                                        (32)           (54)              (63)          (115)
                                                           ---------      ---------         ---------      ---------
    CASH PROVIDED BY (USED IN) FINANCING ACTIVITIES:         (11,873)         4,569            24,012          4,508
                                                           ---------      ---------         ---------      ---------

INCREASE (DECREASE) IN CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS                 239          3,248            10,434         (2,759)

    Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period          19,288          8,707             9,093         14,714
                                                           ---------      ---------         ---------      ---------
    Cash and cash equivalents at end of period             $  19,527      $  11,955         $  19,527      $  11,955
                                                           =========      =========         =========      =========



See notes to consolidated financial statements.


                                                         6


                         Coeur d'Alene Mines Corporation
                                and Subsidiaries
                   Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements
                                   (Unaudited)

NOTE A - BASIS OF PRESENTATION

     The accompanying unaudited consolidated financial statements have been
prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the
United States of America for interim financial information and the instructions
for Form 10-Q and Article 10 of Regulation S-X. Accordingly, they do not include
all the information and footnotes required by accounting principles generally
accepted in the United States of America for complete financial statements. In
the opinion of management, all adjustments (consisting of normal recurring
adjustments) considered necessary for a fair presentation have been included.
Operating results for the three- and six-month periods ended June 30, 2003 are
not necessarily indicative of the results that may be expected for the year
ended December 31, 2003.

     The balance sheet at December 31, 2002 has been derived from the audited
financial statements at that date but does not include all of the information
and footnotes required by accounting principles generally accepted in the United
States for complete financial statements. For further information, refer to the
consolidated financial statements and footnotes thereto included in the Coeur
d'Alene Mines Corporation ("Coeur" or the "Company") Annual Report on Form 10-K
for the year ended December 31, 2002.

NOTE B - SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

     Principles of Consolidation: The consolidated financial statements include
the wholly-owned subsidiaries of the Company, the most significant of which are
Coeur Rochester, Inc., Coeur Silver Valley, Inc., Coeur Alaska, Inc., CDE Cerro
Bayo Ltd., Compania Minera Polimet S.A., Coeur Australia and Empressa Minera
Manquiri S.R.L. The consolidated financial statements also include all entities
in which voting control of more than 50% is held by the Company. The Company has
no investments in entities in which it has greater than 50% ownership interest
accounted for using the equity method. Intercompany balances and transactions
have been eliminated in consolidation. Investments in corporate joint ventures
where the Company has ownership of 50% or less and funds its proportionate share
of expenses are accounted for under the equity method. The Company has no
investments in entities in which it has greater than 20% ownership interest
accounted for using the cost method.

     Revenue Recognition: Revenue is recognized when title to silver and gold
passes at the shipment or delivery point to the buyer, depending on the
contract. The effects of forward sales contracts are reflected in revenue at the
date the related precious metals are delivered or the contracts expire. Third
party smelting and refining costs are recorded as a reduction of revenue.

     Cash and Cash Equivalents: Cash and cash equivalents include all
highly-liquid investments with a maturity of three months or less at the date of
purchase. The Company minimizes its credit risk by investing its cash and cash
equivalents with major international banks and financial institutions located
principally in the United States and Chile with a minimum credit rating of A1 as
defined by Standard & Poor's. The Company's management believes that no
concentration of credit risk exists with respect to investment of its cash and
cash equivalents.

     Short-term Investments: Short-term investments principally consist of
highly-liquid United States, foreign government and corporate securities with
original maturities in excess of three months and less than one year. The
Company classifies all short-term investments as available-for-sale securities.
Unrealized gains and losses on these investments are recorded in accumulated
other comprehensive income as a separate component of shareholders' equity. Any
decline in market value considered to be other than temporary is recognized in
determining net income. Realized gains and losses from the sale of these
investments are included in determining net loss.

                                       7


     Ore on Leach Pad: The heap leach process is a process of extracting silver
and gold by placing ore on an impermeable pad and applying a diluted cyanide
solution that dissolves a portion of the contained silver and gold, which are
then recovered in metallurgical processes.

     The Company uses several integrated steps to scientifically measure the
metal content of ore placed on the leach pads. As the ore body is drilled in
preparation for the blasting process, samples are taken of the drill residue
which is assayed to determine estimated quantities of contained metal. The
Company estimates the quantity of ore by utilizing global positioning satellite
survey techniques. The Company then processes the ore through a crushing
facility where the output is again weighed and sampled for assaying. A
metallurgical reconciliation with the data collected from the mining operation
is completed with appropriate adjustments made to previous estimates. The
crushed ore is then transported to the leach pad for application of the leaching
solution. As the leach solution is collected from the leach pads, it is
continuously sampled for assaying. The quantity of leach solution is measured by
flow meters throughout the leaching and precipitation process. After
precipitation, the product is converted to dore, which is the final product
produced by the mine. The inventory is stated at lower of cost or market, with
cost being determined using the first-in, first-out and weighted average cost
methods.

     The Company reported ore on leach pads of $31.2 million as of June 30,
2003. Of this amount, $14.0 million is reported as a current asset and $17.2
million is reported as a non-current asset. The distinction between current and
non-current is based upon the expected length of time necessary for the leaching
process to remove the metals from the broken ore. The historical cost of the
metal that is expected to be extracted within twelve months is classified as
current and the historical cost of metals contained within the broken ore that
will be extracted beyond twelve months is classified as non-current.

     The estimate of both the ultimate recovery expected over time and the
quantity of metal that may be extracted relative to the time the leach process
occurs requires the use of estimates which are inherently inaccurate since they
rely upon laboratory testwork. Testwork consists of 60 day leach columns from
which the Company projects metal recoveries up to five years in the future. The
quantities of metal contained in the ore are based upon actual weights and assay
analysis. The rate at which the leach process extracts gold and silver from the
crushed ore is based upon laboratory column tests and actual experience
occurring over approximately fifteen years of leach pad operations at the
Rochester Mine. The assumptions used by the Company to measure metal content
during each stage of the inventory conversion process includes estimated
recovery rates based on laboratory testing and assaying. The Company
periodically reviews its estimates compared to actual experience and revises its
estimates when appropriate. The length of time necessary to achieve ultimate
recoveries for silver and gold is currently estimated between 5 and 10 years. In
2003, the estimated recoveries for silver and gold used are 61.5% and 93%,
respectively. However, the ultimate recovery will not be known until leaching
operations cease which is currently estimated for 2011.

     Metal Inventories and Other: Inventories include concentrate ore, dore, ore
in stockpiles and operating materials and supplies. The classification of
inventory is determined by the stage at which the ore is in the production
process. Inventories of ore in stock piles are sampled for gold and silver
content and are valued based on the lower of actual costs incurred or estimated
net realizable value based upon the period ending prices of gold and silver.
Material that does not contain a minimum quantity of gold and silver to cover
estimated processing expense to recover the contained gold and silver is not
classified as inventory and is assigned no value. All inventories are stated at
the lower of cost or market, with cost being determined using the first-in,
first-out and weighted average cost methods. Concentrate and dore inventory
includes product at the mine site and product held by refineries and are also
valued at lower of cost or market.

     Property, Plant, and Equipment: Expenditures for new facilities, new assets
or expenditures that extend the useful lives of existing facilities are
capitalized and depreciated using the straight-line method at rates sufficient
to depreciate such costs over the shorter of estimated productive lives of such
facilities or the useful life of the individual assets. Productive lives range
from 7 to 31 years for buildings and improvements, 3 to 13 years


                                       8


for machinery and equipment and 3 to 7 years for furniture and fixtures. Certain
mining equipment is depreciated using the units-of-production method based upon
estimated total proven and probable reserves. Maintenance and repairs are
expensed as incurred.

     Operational Mining Properties and Mine Development: Mineral exploration
costs are expensed as incurred. When it has been determined that a mineral
property can be economically developed as a result of establishing proven and
probable reserves, the costs incurred to develop such property including costs
to further delineate the ore body and remove over burden to initially expose the
ore body, are capitalized. Such costs are amortized using the
units-of-production method over the estimated life of the ore body based on
proven and probable reserves. Significant payments related to the acquisition of
the land and mineral rights are capitalized as incurred. Prior to acquiring such
land or mineral rights the Company generally makes a preliminary evaluation to
determine that the property has significant potential to develop an economic ore
body. The time between initial acquisition and full evaluation of a property's
potential is variable and is determined by many factors including: location
relative to existing infrastructure, the property's stage of development,
geological controls and metal prices. If a mineable ore body is discovered, such
costs are amortized when production begins using the units-of-production method
based on proven and probable reserves. If no mineable ore body is discovered,
such costs are expensed in the period in which it is determined the property has
no future economic value. Interest expense allocable to the cost of developing
mining properties and to construct new facilities is capitalized until assets
are ready for their intended use. Gains or losses from sales or retirements of
assets are included in interest and other income.

     Mineral Interests: The Company classifies mineral interests as intangible
assets. The excess of the cost of each mineral interest over its estimated
residual value is amortized over the estimated life of the related mineral
right. Residual values for undeveloped mineral interests represent the expected
fair value of the interests at the time the Company plans to convert, develop,
further explore or dispose of the interests. The residual values represent a
percentage of the carrying value. For mineral interests with proven and probable
reserves, the amortization is based upon the units-of-production method. For
mineral interests with only mineralized material, amortization is based on the
straight-line method based upon the estimated useful life of the mineral
interest.

     Asset Impairment: Management reviews and evaluates its long-lived assets
for impairment when events or changes in circumstances indicate that the related
carrying amounts may not be recoverable. The Company utilizes the methodology
set forth in Statement of Financial Accounting Standard ("SFAS") No. 144,
"Accounting for the Impairment or Disposal of Long-Lived Assets," to evaluate
the recoverability of capitalized property and mineral costs. An impairment is
considered to exist if total estimated future cash flows or probability-weighted
cash flows on an undiscounted basis, is less than the carrying amount of the
assets, including property plant and equipment, mineral property, development
property, and any deferred costs such as deferred stripping. An impairment loss
is measured and recorded based on discounted estimated future cash flows or the
application of an expected present value technique to estimate fair value in the
absence of a market price. Future cash flows include estimates of proven and
probable recoverable ounces, gold and silver prices (considering current and
historical prices, price trends and related factors), production levels, capital
and reclamation costs, all based on detailed engineering life-of-mine plans.
Assumptions underlying future cash flow estimates are subject to risks and
uncertainties. Any differences between significant assumptions and market
conditions and/or the Company's performance could have a material effect on the
Company's financial position and results of operations. In estimating future
cash flows, assets are grouped at the lowest level for which there are
identifiable cash flows that are largely independent of cash flows from other
groups. Generally, in estimating future cash flows, all assets are grouped at a
particular mine for which there is identifiable cash flow.

     Restricted Investments: The Company, under the terms of its lease, self
insurance, and bonding agreements with certain banks, lending institutions and
regulatory agencies, is required to collateralize certain portions of the
Company's obligations. The Company has collateralized these obligations by
assigning certificates of deposit that have maturity dates ranging from three
months to a year, to the respective institutions or agency. At June 30, 2003 and
December 31, 2002, the Company had certificates of deposit under these
agreements of $15.0 million and $13.1 million, respectively, restricted for this
purpose. The ultimate timing for


                                       9


the release of the collateralized amounts is dependent on the timing and closure
of each mine. In order to release the collateral, the Company must seek approval
from certain government agencies responsible for monitoring the mine closure
status. Collateral could also be released to the extent the Company was able to
secure alternative financial assurance satisfactory to the regulatory agencies.
The Company believes there is a reasonable probability that the collateral will
remain in place beyond a twelve-month period and has therefore classified these
investments as long-term.

     Deferred Stripping Costs: Deferred stripping costs are unique to the mining
industry and are determined based on the Company's estimates for the life of
mine strip ratio for each mine. These costs are capitalized in periods when the
life of mine ratio is below the current mining strip ratio, and amortized during
periods where the life of mine strip ratio is above the current strip ratio. The
Rochester mine is the only mine that has previously capitalized deferred
stripping costs. The life of mine strip ratio that was used to accumulate the
deferred stripping amounts was 1.5 to 1 (waste to ore) and was based on the
estimated average stripping ratio for the life of the mine, compared to the then
current ratio of 2.2 to 1 (waste to ore). The deferred stripping costs have been
amortized as waste and ore have been removed from the Rochester mine pit. At
present the remaining life of mine plan estimates the future stripping ratio as
1.1 to 1 (waste to ore), and the remaining costs will be amortized over the
remaining life of the mine. At June 30, 2003 and December 31, 2002 the carrying
amount of the deferred stripping costs were $1.3 million and $1.5 million,
respectively, and are included in other assets in the accompanying balance
sheet. No additional deferred stripping costs were capitalized during the
periods presented. Based on current reserves and current production levels
complete amortization should occur in less than four years. The amounts that
were amortized for the three and six months ended June 30, 2003 were $0.1
million and $0.2 million, respectively, and for the three- and six- month
periods ended June 30, 2002 were $0.1 million and $0.1 million, respectively.

     Reclamation and Remediation Costs: The Company adopted SFAS No. 143,
"Accounting for Asset Retirement Obligations" on January 1, 2003. SFAS No. 143
requires entities to record the fair value of liabilities for retirement
obligations of acquired assets. The Company measured the cumulative accretion
and accumulated depreciation for the period from the date the liability would
have been recognized if FASB No. 143 were in effect when the Company incurred
the liability to the date of the adoption of FASB No. 143 and has reported these
as a cumulative effect of a change in accounting principle. For the initial
measurement of these existing obligations we have used current information,
assumptions, and interest rates. Estimated future reclamation and remediation
costs are based principally on legal and regulatory requirements.

     The Asset Retirement Obligation is measured using assumptions for cash
outflows such as expected labor costs, allocated overhead and equipment charges,
contractor markup and inflation adjustments to determine the total obligation.

     The sum of all these costs were discounted, using the credit adjusted
risk-free interest rate (current assumption of 7.5%), from the time we expect to
pay the retirement obligation to the time we incur the obligation. The
measurement objective is to determine the amount a third party would demand to
assume the asset retirement obligation.

     Upon initial recognition of a liability for an asset retirement obligation,
the Company capitalized the asset retirement cost with a corresponding debit to
the carrying amount of the related long-lived asset. The Company will deplete
this amount to operating expense using the units-of-production method. The
Company evaluates the cash flow estimates at the end of each reporting period to
determine whether the estimates continue to be appropriate. Upward revisions in
the amount of undiscounted cash flows will be discounted using the current
credit-adjusted risk-free rate. Downward revisions will be discounted using the
credit-adjusted risk-free rate that existed when the original liability was
recorded.

                                       10


     The following is a description of the changes to the Company's asset
retirement obligations from January 1 to June 30, 2003:

     Assets:
                                                                 2003
                                                            --------------
                                                            (in thousands)

     Asset Retirement Obligation - January 1, 2003            $  20,662
     Accretion                                                      775
     Additions                                                        -
     Settlements                                                   (716)
                                                              ---------
     Asset Retirement Obligation - June 30, 2003              $  20,721

     Foreign Currency: Substantially all assets and liabilities of foreign
subsidiaries are translated at exchange rates in effect at the date of the
transaction or at the end of each period. Revenues and expenses are translated
at the average exchange rate for the period. Foreign currency transaction gains
and losses are included in the determination of net income.

     Financial Instruments: The Company uses derivative financial instruments as
part of an overall risk-management strategy. These instruments are used as a
means of hedging exposure to precious metals prices and foreign currency
exchange rates. The Company does not hold or issue derivative financial
instruments for trading purposes. If the Company enters into derivatives that
qualify for hedge accounting, deferral accounting is applied only if the
derivatives continue to reduce the price risk associated with the underlying
hedged production. Written options do not qualify for hedge accounting and are
marked to market each reporting period with corresponding changes in fair value
recorded to operations as other income.

     The Company uses forward sales contracts to fix a portion of its exposure
to precious metals prices. The underlying production for forward sales contracts
is designated for physical delivery at the inception of the contract. Contracted
prices on forward sales contracts are recognized in product sales as the
designated production is delivered or sold. In the event of early settlement of
forward contracts, gains and losses are deferred and recognized in income at the
originally designated delivery date.

     The Company uses foreign currency contracts to hedge its exposure to
movements in the foreign currency translation amounts for anticipated
transactions in Chilean pesos. These contracts are marked-to-market to Other
Comprehensive Income (Loss) each reporting period.

     Income Taxes: The Company computes income taxes in accordance with SFAS No.
109, "Accounting for Income Taxes." SFAS No. 109 requires an asset and liability
approach which results in the recognition of deferred tax liabilities and assets
for the expected future tax consequences of temporary differences between the
carrying amounts and the tax basis of those assets and liabilities, as well as
operating loss and tax credit carryforwards, using enacted tax rates in effect
in the years in which the differences are expected to reverse.

     The Company has operating loss carryforwards which expire in 2008 through
2020 for U.S. carryforwards and indefinitely for foreign carryforwards. The
Company has reviewed its net deferred tax assets and has not recognized
potential tax benefits arising therefrom because at this time management
believes it is more likely than not that the benefits will not be realized in
future years.

     Comprehensive Loss: In addition to net loss, comprehensive income includes
all changes in equity during a period, except those resulting from investments
by and distributions to owners. Items of comprehensive income for the three- and
six-month periods ended June 30, 2003 and 2002 include the following:


                                       11


                                     Three Months Ended       Six Months Ended
                                    --------------------    --------------------
                                    June 30,    June 30,    June 30,    June 30,
                                      2003        2002        2003        2002
                                    --------    --------    --------    --------
Unrealized loss on marketable
 securities                          $(234)      $(578)      $(452)      $(477)
Change in fair value of derivative
 hedging, net of settlement            134        --            55        --
                                     -----       -----       -----       -----
Other comprehensive loss             $(100)      $(578)      $(397)      $(477)
                                     =====       =====       =====       =====

     Loss Per Share: Loss per share is computed by dividing the net loss
attributable to common stock by the weighted average number of common shares
outstanding during each period. All stock options outstanding at each period end
have been excluded from the weighted average share calculation. The effect of
potentially dilutive stock options outstanding was antidilutive in the three-
and six- month periods ended June 30, 2003 and 2002.

     Use of Estimates: The preparation of financial statements in conformity
with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America
requires the Company's management to make estimates and assumptions that affect
the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, the disclosure of contingent
assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported
amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results
could differ from those estimates.

     Reclassifications: Certain reclassifications of prior year balances have
been made to conform to current year presentation.


NOTE C - ORE ON LEACH PADS

     Ore on leach pad consists of the following:
                                              June 30,      December 31,
                                                2003            2002
                                              --------      ------------

     Ore on leach pad - Current               $ 14,046        $ 11,082
     Ore on leach pad - Non-current             17,228          15,474
                                              --------        --------
              Total ore on leach pads         $ 31,274        $ 26,556
                                              ========        ========

NOTE D - METAL AND OTHER INVENTORIES

     Inventories consist of the following:
                                                    December 31,
                                                2003            2002
                                              --------        --------

Concentrate and dore inventory                $ 10,682        $ 10,189
Supplies                                         4,683           4,657
                                              --------        --------
                                              $ 15,365        $ 14,846
                                              ========        ========

NOTE E - INCOME TAXES

     The Company computes income taxes in accordance with SFAS No. 109,
"Accounting for Income Taxes." SFAS No. 109 requires an asset and liability
approach which results in the recognition of deferred tax liabilities and assets
for the expected future tax consequences of temporary differences between the
carrying amounts and the tax basis of those assets and liabilities, as well as
operating loss and tax credit carryforwards, using enacted tax rates in effect
in the years in which the differences are expected to reverse. The Company has
operating loss carryforwards which expire in 2008 through 2020 for U.S.
carryforwards and indefinitely for foreign carryforwards. The Company has
reviewed its net deferred tax assets and has not recognized potential tax
benefits arising therefrom because at this time management believes it is more
likely than not that the


                                       12


benefits will not be realized in future years. The amount recognized in the
current quarter relates to a cash refund received during the quarter.

NOTE F - LONG-TERM DEBT AND SUPPLEMENTAL CASH FLOW INFORMATION

     During the first half of 2003, holders of $2.8 million of the Series I 13
3/8% Convertible Senior Subordinated Notes due December 31, 2003 (the "Series I
13 3/8% Notes") voluntarily converted such notes, in accordance with original
terms, into approximately 2.1 million shares of common stock. In addition, 0.1
million shares of common stock were issued as payment for $0.2 million of
interest expense on the Series I 13 3/8% Notes.

     During the first half of 2003, the Company repurchased $26.9 million and
$1.7 million principal amount of its outstanding 6 3/8% and 7 1/4% Convertible
Subordinated Debentures, respectively, in exchange for 16.9 million shares of
common stock and recorded a loss on exchange and early retirement of debt of
approximately $28.2 million. In addition, 0.6 million shares of common stock
were issued as payment for $0.9 million of interest expense as part of the
transaction. In conjunction with the issuance of the 9% Convertible Senior
Subordinated Notes, the Company also issued 0.6 million shares of common stock
for partial payment of offering costs of $1.0 million.

     During the first half of 2003, the Company issued 1.2 million shares of
common stock in conjunction with its long-term incentive program.

     During the 2nd quarter of 2002, the Company repurchased $10.3 million, $0.8
million and $0.3 million principal amount of its outstanding 6%, 6-3/8% and
7-1/4% Convertible Subordinated Debentures, respectively, in exchange for 11.9
million shares of common stock and recorded a loss on retirement of debt of
approximately $2.7 million. In addition, holders of $10.3 million of the Series
I Notes voluntarily converted such Notes, under the terms of the indenture, into
approximately 7.7 million shares of common stock. The Company also issued 2.7
million shares of common stock as payment of $4.2 million of accrued interest on
the 13 3/8% Notes.

     During the first half of 2002, the Company repurchased $13.8 million, $0.8
million and $0.3 million principal amount of its outstanding 6%, 6-3/8% and
7-1/4% Convertible Subordinated Debentures, respectively, in exchange for 15.3
million shares of common stock and recorded a loss on retirement of debt of
approximately $2.9 million. In addition, holders of $16.0 million of the Series
I Notes voluntarily converted such Notes, under the terms of the indenture, into
approximately 12.8 million shares of common stock. The Company also issued 2.7
million shares of common stock as payment of $4.2 million of accrued interest on
the 13 3/8% Notes.

NOTE G - SEGMENT REPORTING

     Operating segments are defined as components of an enterprise about which
separate financial information is available that is evaluated regularly by the
chief operating decision maker, or decision making group, in deciding how to
allocate resources and in assessing performance. The Company's chief operating
decision making group is comprised of the Chief Executive Officer, the Chief
Financial Officer and the Chief Operating Officer.

     The operating segments are managed separately because each segment
represents a distinct use of Company resources and contribution to the Company's
cash flows in its respective geographic area. The Company's reportable operating
segments are the Rochester, Coeur Silver Valley and Cerro Bayo mining
properties, and the Company's exploration programs. All operating segments are
engaged in the discovery and/or mining of gold and silver and generate the
majority of their revenues from the sale of precious metal concentrates and/or
refined precious metals. The Coeur Silver Valley and Cerro Bayo mines sell
precious metal concentrates, typically under long term contracts to smelters
located in Canada (Noranda Inc. and Cominco Ltd.), and Japan (DOWA Mining
Company). Refined gold and silver produced by the Rochester mine is primarily
sold on a spot basis to precious metal trading banks such as Morgan Stanley,
Mitsui and Standard Bank.

                                       13


     The other segment includes the corporate headquarters, elimination of
intersegment transactions and other items necessary to reconcile to consolidated
amounts. Revenues in the other segment are generated principally from interest
received from the Company's cash and investments that are not allocated to the
operating segments. The accounting policies of the operating segments are the
same as those described in the summary of significant accounting policies in the
Company's Annual Report on Form 10-K. The Company evaluates performance and
allocates resources based on each segments profit or loss before interest,
income taxes, depreciation and amortization, unusual and infrequent items, and
extraordinary items.


Segment Reporting
(In Thousands)

                                      Rochester     Silver      Cerro
                                       Valley       Valley       Bayo      Exploration      Other         Total
                                      ---------    --------    --------    -----------    ----------    ----------
                                                                                      
Six Months Ended June 30, 2003

Total net sales and revenues          $ 20,787     $  9,647    $ 25,104     $     52      $    (113)    $  55,477
                                      ========     ========    ========     ========      =========     =========

Depreciation and depletion            $  2,705     $    751    $  6,102     $     16      $     124     $   9,698
Interest income                           --           --      $      1         --        $     157     $     158
Interest expense                          --           --      $    218         --        $   3,805     $   4,023
Income tax (credit) expense               --           --          --           --        $      (7)    $      (7)
Loss on early retirement of debt          --           --          --           --        $ (28,188)    $ (28,188)
Profit (loss)                         $  3,187     $    206    $ 12,978     $   (114)     $  (7,684)    $   8,573

Segment assets (A)                    $ 59,814     $ 10,655    $ 33,238     $    515      $  48,382     $ 152,604
Capital expenditures for property     $  4,294     $  1,634    $  1,587     $     55      $     141     $   7,711

Six Months Ended June 30, 2002

Total net sales and revenues          $ 24,992     $ 13,276    $     55     $   (385)     $   1,188     $  39,126
                                      ========     ========    ========     ========      =========     =========

Depreciation and depletion            $  2,137     $  1,629    $  1,434     $     17      $     194     $   5,411
Interest income                           --           --          --           --        $     181     $     181
Interest expense                          --           --          --           --        $   9,848     $   9,848
Loss on early retirement of debt          --           --          --           --        $  (2,920)    $  (2,920)
Profit (loss)                         $ (1,420)    $  3,760    $    759     $ (1,489)     $  (6,182)    $  (4,572)

Segment assets (A)                    $ 63,144     $ 27,642    $ 31,430     $    427      $  49,182     $ 171,825
Capital expenditures for property     $    300     $    582    $  4,207         --        $      12     $   5,101

Notes:
(A)  Segment assets consist of receivables, prepaids, inventories, property, plant and equipment, and mining
     properties


Segment Reporting Cont.
(In Thousands)                                       Six Months Ended June 30,
                                                        2003           2002
                                                     ----------     ----------
(Loss)
------
Total profit (loss) from reportable segments         $   8,573      $  (4,572)
Depreciation, depletion and amortization expense        (9,698)        (5,411)
Interest expense                                        (4,023)        (9,848)
Other                                                  (28,188)        (2,920)
                                                     ---------      ---------
     Loss before income taxes                        $ (33,336)     $ (22,751)
                                                     =========      =========

                                                              June 30,
                                                        2003           2002
                                                     ----------     ----------
Assets
------
Total assets for reportable segments                   152,604      $ 171,825
Cash and cash equivalents                               19,527         11,955
Short-term investments                                     301            763
Other assets                                            23,381         18,129
                                                     ---------      ---------
      Total consolidated assets                      $ 195,813      $ 202,672
                                                     =========      =========

                                       14


Geographic Information
----------------------
(In thousands)                                                      Long-Lived
 June 30, 2003                                        Revenues        Assets
                                                     ----------     ----------

 United States                                       $  30,682      $  59,858
 Chile                                                  24,528         16,939
 Other Foreign Countries                                   267         19,859
                                                     ---------      ---------
 Consolidated Total                                  $  55,477      $  96,656
                                                     =========      =========

                                                                    Long-Lived
 June 30, 2002                                        Revenues        Assets
                                                     ----------     ----------

 United States                                       $  39,458      $  75,080
 Chile                                                    (292)        21,922
 Other Foreign Countries                                   (40)        21,341
                                                     ---------      ---------
 Consolidated Total                                  $  39,126      $ 118,343
                                                     =========      =========

Revenues are geographically separated based upon the country in which operations
and the underlying assets generating those revenues reside.

NOTE H - HEDGING

     For the first half of 2003 the Company recorded a realized loss of
approximately $0.5 million in connection with its gold hedge program. The
Company has 40,000 ounces in forward sales in its gold protection program,
whereby over the next twelve months the Company will receive an average price of
$339 per ounce.

     The following table summarizes the information at June 30, 2003 associated
with the Company's financial and derivative financial instruments that are
sensitive to changes in interest rates, commodity prices and foreign exchange
rates. For long-term debt obligations, the table presents principal cash flows
and related average interest rates. For gold call options and amortizing forward
sales, the table presents ounces contracted to be delivered and the related
average price per ounce in U.S. dollars. For foreign currency exchange
contracts, the table presents the notional amount in Chilean Peso's to be
purchased along with the average foreign exchange rate.



                                                                                                       Fair
                                                                                                       Value
(dollars in thousands)     2003      2004        2005    2006          2007   Thereafter     Total    6/30/02
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                                                                              
Liabilities
   Long Term Debt
   (prior to exchange)                                                                                $63,228
              Fixed Rate   $ 9,887   $ 5,873   $ 9,939   $     -   $ 37,185     $    -     $ 62,884
   Average Interest Rate    9.166%    8.607%    8.681%    9.000%     9.000%

    Derivative Financial
             Instruments
            Gold Forward                                                                                 $276
             Sales - USD
                  Ounces    26,000    14,000         -         -          -          -       40,000
         Price Per Ounce      $331      $353         -         -          -          -            -

        Foreign Currency
               Contracts
      Chilean Peso - USD   $ 2,035         -         -         -          -          -       $2,035       $45
           Exchange Rate       708         -         -         -          -          -            -
            (CLP to USD)



                                     15



     Fair value is determined by trading information on or near the balance
sheet date. Long term debt represents the face amount of the outstanding
convertible debentures and timing of when these become due. Interest rates
presented in the table are calculated using the weighted average of the
outstanding face amount of each debenture for the period remaining in each
period presented. All long term debt is denominated in US dollars.

NOTE I - stock-based compensation

     In December, 2002 the FASB issued SFAS No. 148, "Accounting for Stock-based
Compensation-Transition and Disclosure." SFAS 148 amends FASB Statement No. 123,
"Accounting for Stock-Based Compensation" to provide alternative methods of
transition for a voluntary change to the fair-value based method of accounting
for stock-based employee compensation. In addition, this Statement amends the
disclosure requirements of Statement 123 to require prominent disclosures in
both annual and interim financial statements about the method of accounting for
stock-based employee compensation and the effect of the method used on the
reported results. At June 30, 2003, the Company had one stock-based employee
compensation plan. The Company accounts for this plan under the recognition and
measurement principles of APB Opinion No. 25, Accounting for Stock Issued to
Employees, and related Interpretations. Employee compensation cost reflected in
net income was $0.2 million for restricted stock granted under this plan and no
compensation cost is reflected for options granted as all options granted under
this plan had an exercise price equal to the market value of the underlying
common stock on the date of the grant. The following table illustrates the
effect on net income and earnings per share if the Company had applied the fair
value recognition provisions of FASB Statement No. 123, Accounting for
Stock-Based Compensation, to stock-based employee compensation.



                                                               Three Months Ended           Six Months Ended
(In thousands except per share data)                                June 30,                    June 30,
                                                             ----------------------     -----------------------
                                                                2003        2002           2003         2002
                                                             ---------   ----------     ----------   ----------
                                                                                         
Net loss attributable to Common shareholders                 $ (4,445)   $ (10,855)     $ (35,635)   $ (22,751)
Unaudited net loss pro forma                                 $ (4,455)   $ (10,865)     $ (35,655)   $ (22,771)
Basic and diluted net loss per share as reported             $  (0.03)   $   (0.16)     $   (0.26)   $   (0.38)
Unaudited basic and diluted net loss per share pro forma     $  (0.03)   $   (0.16)     $   (0.26)   $   (0.38)


     The provisions of SFAS 148 will not have a material impact on the Company,
as it does not plan to adopt the fair-value method of accounting for stock
options at the current time.

NOTE J - LITIGATION AND OTHER EVENTS

Federal Natural Resources Action

     On March 22, 1996, an action was filed in the United States District Court
for the District of Idaho by the United States against various defendants,
including the Company, asserting claims under CERCLA and the Clean Water Act for
alleged damages to federal natural resources in the Coeur d'Alene River Basin of
Northern Idaho as a result of alleged releases of hazardous substances from
mining activities conducted in the area since the late 1800s.

     On March 16, 2001, the Company and representatives of the U.S. Government,
including the Environmental Protection Agency, the Department of Interior and
the Department of Agriculture, reached an agreement in principle to settle the
lawsuit, which represents the only suit in which the Company has been named as a
party. Pursuant to the terms of the Consent Decree, dated May 14, 2001, the
Company has paid the U.S. Government a total of approximately $3.9 million, of
which $3.3 million was paid in May 2001 and the remaining $.6 million was paid
in June 2001. In addition, the Company will (i) pay the United States 50% of any
future recoveries from insurance companies for claims for defense and
indemnification coverage under general liability insurance policies in excess of
$0.6 million, (ii) accomplish certain cleanup work on the Mineral Point


                                       16


property (i.e., the former Coeur Mine site) and Caladay property, and (iii) make
available certain real property to be used as a waste repository. Finally,
commencing five years after effectiveness of the settlement and continuing for
15 years thereafter, the Company will be obligated to pay net smelter royalties
on its operating properties, up to a maximum of $3 million, amounting to a 2%
net smelter royalty on silver production if the price of silver exceeds $6.50
per ounce, and a $5.00 per ounce net smelter royalty on gold production if the
price of gold exceeds $325 per ounce. The Company recorded $4.2 million of
expenses, which included $3.9 million of settlement payments, in the fourth
quarter of 2000 in connection with the settlement.

Lawsuit to Recover Inventory

     During the first quarter of 2000, Handy & Harman Refining Group, Inc.
("Handy & Harman"), to which the Rochester Mine had historically sent
approximately 50% of its dore, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy. The Company had
inventory at the refinery of approximately 67,000 ounces of silver and 5,000
ounces of gold that had been delivered to certain creditors of Handy & Harman.
On February 27, 2001 the Company commenced a lawsuit against Handy & Harman and
certain others in the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the District of Connecticut
seeking recovery of the metals and/or damages. Handy & Harman's Chapter 11
liquidation plan was confirmed by the Bankruptcy Court in August 2001 and on
November 3, 2001, the Company received approximately $294,000 from Handy &
Harman as a partial payment under the plan. This suit has been settled by a
payment to the Company in the amount of $50,000. The liquidating custodian of
Handy & Harman under the liquidation plan filed suit against the Company in
March 2002 for the value of 100,000 ounces of silver (i.e., approximately
$500,000) as a preference based on the Company's draw-down of its silver held by
Handy & Harman in mid-March 2000. Based on this legal action, the Company
determined that the recovery of any additional amounts would be remote. As a
result, the Company recorded a $1.4 million write-down of the remaining carrying
amount in the fourth quarter of 2001. Settlement negotiations resulted in an
agreement with the liquidating custodian for settlement of his claim. The sum of
$70,000 will be paid by the Company. This payment will be deducted from a
payment due to the Company in the amount of approximately $222,000. On July 10,
2003, the court approved the settlement. The appeal period for the order is 10
days following its entry.

Private Property Damage Action

     On January 7, 2002, a private class action suit captioned Baugh v. Asarco,
et al., was filed in the Idaho District Court for the First District (Lawsuit
No. 2002131) in Kootenai County, Idaho against the companies that have been
defendants in the prior Bunker Hill and natural resources litigation in the
Coeur d'Alene Basin, including the Company, by eight northern Idaho residents
seeking medical benefits and real property damages from the mining companies
involved in the Bunker Hill Superfund site. In October 2002, the court conducted
a hearing on motions resulting in an order striking certain of the alleged
causes of action from the complaint, and dismissing the complaint with leave to
amend it. In January 2003, the plaintiffs filed an amended complaint. Certain of
the defendants, including the Company, filed motions to dismiss the complaint.
The court struck the amended complaint and a second amended complaint has been
filed. While the Company believes the suit is without merit, at this early stage
of the proceedings, the Company cannot predict the outcome of this suit.

State of Maine and State of Idaho Superfund Sites Related to Callahan Mining
Corporation

     During 2001, the United States Forest Service made a formal request for
information regarding the Deadwood Mine Site located in central Idaho. Callahan
Mining Corporation had operated at this site during the 1940's. The Forest
Service believes that some cleanup action is required at the location. However,
Coeur


                                       17


d'Alene Mines Corporation did not acquire Callahan until 1991, more than 40
years after Callahan disposed of its interest in the Deadwood property. The
Company did not make any decisions with respect to generation, transport or
disposal of hazardous waste at the site. Therefore, it is believed that the
Company is not liable for any cleanup, and if Callahan might be liable, it has
no substantial assets with which to satisfy any such liability. To date no claim
has been made by the United States for any dollar amount of cleanup costs
against either the Company or Callahan.

     During 2002, the EPA made a formal request for information regarding a
Callahan mine site in the State of Maine. Callahan operated there in the late
1960's, shut the operations down in the early 1970's and disposed of the
property. The EPA contends that some cleanup action is warranted at the site,
and listed it on the National Priorities List in late 2002. The Company believes
that because it made no decisions with respect to generation, transport or
disposal of hazardous waste at this location, it is not liable for any cleanup
costs. If Callahan might have liability, it has no substantial assets with which
to satisfy such liability. To date, no claim has been made for any dollar amount
of cleanup costs against either the Company or Callahan.

NOTE K - SUBSEQUENT EVENTS

     Effective as of July 10, 2003, Coeur d'Alene Mines Corporation entered into
a series of agreements under which indebtedness of the Company will be exchanged
for or converted into shares of the Company's common stock, (the "Common
Stock"). The Company and each of the holders of the Company's 9% Senior
Subordinated Notes due February 2007 (the "9% Notes") entered into an Early
Conversion Agreement. The amount of principal to be converted under the Early
Conversion Agreements is $32.6 million, and the common shares to be issued,
including interest, is approximately 27.5 million. After giving effect to the
exchanges contemplated by the Early Conversion Agreements, an aggregate of $4.6
million of 9% Notes will remain outstanding. The Company expects to record a
loss on early retirement of debt of $4.3 million in the third quarter of 2003 in
conjunction with these transactions.

     In connection with the Early Conversion Agreements, the Company, the
holders of the 9% Notes and the trustee under the indenture with respect to the
9% Notes also amended such indenture. The amendments are set forth in a
Supplemental Indenture, dated July 15, 2003. Together with the Early Conversion
Agreements, the Supplemental Indenture provides that:

     (i) the holders of the remaining 9% Notes will not convert such 9% Notes
     until the earlier of the Company's next annual shareholders meeting, at
     which time the approval of the Company's shareholders to issue shares in
     excess of the NYSE 20% limitation will be sought, or June 30, 2004;

     (ii) until that time, or if the stockholder approval is not obtained, any
     optional redemption by the Company of the remaining 9% Notes will be at a
     price equal to the greater of the current redemption price and the then
     market value of the number of shares into which the remaining 9% Notes
     would be convertible, but for the operation of the NYSE 20% limit;

     (iii) if the stockholder approval is not obtained, holders of the 9% Notes,
     upon their election to convert, will receive, instead of shares of Common
     Stock, cash at a price equal to the then market value of the number of
     shares into which the remaining 9% Notes would be convertible, but for the
     operation of the NYSE 20% limit; and

     (iv) each holder of 9% Notes agreed not to transfer more than 2 million
     shares of Common Stock to any transferee in one transaction or a series of
     transactions.

     In other exchanges subsequent to, the Company issued an aggregate of 0.8
million shares of common stock for $1.0 million principal amount of the
Company's 6.3/8% Debentures, and an aggregate of 0.3 million shares of


                                       18


common stock for $0.4 million principal amount of the Company's 7 1/4%
Debentures. The Company expects to record a loss on early retirement of debt of
$1.5 million in the third quarter of 2003 in conjunction with these transaction.

     On July 7, 2003, the Company sold 0.2 million shares of common stock to an
institutional investor for an aggregate of $0.3 million, or $1.40 per share. The
net proceeds from the sale of shares were used to pay amounts owed by the
Company's subsidiary, Empresa Minera Manquiri S.A., a Bolivian corporation,
under contracts pursuant to which it obtained certain mineral rights in Bolivia
and for general corporate purposes. The sale of share was effected pursuant to
the Company's shelf registration statement

Item 2.  MANAGEMENT'S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL
         CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

     Management's Discussion and Analysis includes references to total cash
costs per ounce of silver produced both on an individual mine basis and on a
consolidated basis. Total cash costs per ounce represent a non- U.S. GAAP
measurement that management uses to monitor and evaluate the performance of its
mining operations. A reconciliation of total cash costs per ounce to U.S. GAAP
"Production Expenses" is also provided herein and should be referred to when
reading the total cash cost per ounce measurement.

General

     The results of the Company's operations are significantly affected by the
market prices of silver and gold which may fluctuate widely and are affected by
many factors beyond the Company's control, including, without limitation,
interest rates, expectations regarding inflation, currency values, governmental
decisions regarding the disposal of precious metals stockpiles, global and
regional political and economic conditions, and other factors.

     The average prices of silver (Handy & Harman) and gold (London Final) for
the first six months of 2003 were $4.66 and $349 per ounce, respectively. The
market prices of silver and gold on July 21, 2003 were $4.79 per ounce and $350
per ounce, respectively.

     The Company's operating mines are the Rochester mine in Nevada, the Galena
mine in the Coeur d'Alene Mining District of Idaho, the Cerro Bayo mine in
Chile, and the Mina Martha mine in Argentina.

     This document contains numerous forward-looking statements relating to the
Company's gold and silver mining business. The United States Private Securities
Litigation Reform Act of 1995 provides a "safe harbor" for certain
forward-looking statements. Operating, exploration and financial data, and other
statements in this document are based on information the Company believes
reasonable, but involve significant uncertainties as to future gold and silver
prices, costs, ore grades, estimation of gold and silver reserves, mining and
processing conditions, changes that could result from the Company's future
acquisition of new mining properties or businesses, the risks and hazards
inherent in the mining business (including environmental hazards, industrial
accidents, weather or geologically related conditions), regulatory and
permitting matters, and risks inherent in the ownership and operation of, or
investment in, mining properties or businesses in foreign countries. Actual
results and timetables could vary significantly from the estimates presented.
Readers are cautioned not to put undue reliance on forward-looking statements.
The Company disclaims any intent or obligation to update publicly these
forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future
events or otherwise.


                                       19


     The following table sets forth the amounts of silver and gold produced by
the following mining properties, each of which is wholly owned by the Company,
and the cash and full costs of such production during the three- and six-month
periods ended June 30, 2003 and 2002:

                                   Three Months Ended        Six Months Ended
                                        June 30,                 June 30,
                                 ----------------------   ----------------------
                                    2003        2002         2003        2002
                                 ----------  ----------   ----------  ----------
ROCHESTER MINE
  Silver ozs                      1,353,346   1,637,443    2,443,046   3,053,210
  Gold ozs                           15,144      17,132       25,891      33,555
  Cash Costs per oz./silver      $     4.33  $     2.88   $     5.28  $     3.27
  Full Costs per oz./silver      $     5.45  $     3.72   $     6.32  $     4.11

GALENA MINE
  Silver ozs                      1,060,696   1,383,449    2,296,467   2,856,991
  Cash Costs per oz./silver      $     4.73  $     4.14   $     4.46  $     4.05
  Full Costs per oz./silver      $     5.10  $     4.86   $     4.78  $     4.74

CERRO BAYO/MARTHA MINE (A)
  Silver ozs                      1,347,745     260,543    2,625,202     260,543
  Gold ozs                           14,538       5,919       36,954       5,919
  Cash Costs per oz./silver      $     1.33  $     1.39   $     0.54  $     1.39
  Full Costs per oz./silver      $     2.98  $     6.79   $     2.51  $     6.79

CONSOLIDATED PRODUCTION TOTALS
  Silver ozs                      3,761,787   3,281,435    7,364,715   6,170,744
  Gold ozs                           29,682      23,051       62,845      39,474
  Primary Silver Cost per oz     $     3.37  $     3.29   $     3.33  $     3.55

CONSOLIDATED SALES TOTALS
  Silver ozs. sold                3,624,000   3,100,000    7,774,000   6,034,000
  Gold ozs. sold                     33,000      19,000       68,000      36,000
  Realized price per silver oz   $     4.53  $     4.77   $     4.65  $     4.64
  Realized price per gold oz     $      330  $      304   $      336  $      298

(A) The Company commenced production in April 2002.
See reconciliation of non-GAAP cash costs to GAAP production costs below under
"Cost and Expenses".

     Note: "Cash Costs per Ounce" are calculated by dividing the cash costs
computed for each of the Company's mining properties for a specified period by
the amount of silver ounces produced by that property during that same period.
Management uses cash costs per ounce produced as a key indicator of the
profitability of each of its mining properties. Gold and silver are sold and
priced in the world financial markets on a US dollar per ounce basis. By
calculating the cash costs from each of the Company's mines on the same unit
basis, management can easily determine the gross margin that each ounce of gold
and silver produced is generating.

     "Cash Costs" are costs directly related to the physical activities of
producing silver and gold and include mining, processing and other plant costs,
deferred mining adjustments, third-party refining and smelting costs, marketing
expense, on-site general and administrative costs, royalties, in-mine drilling
expenditures that are related to production and other direct costs. Sales of
by-product metals (primarily gold and copper) are deducted from the above in
computing cash costs. Cash costs exclude depreciation, depletion and
amortization, corporate general and administrative expense, exploration,
interest, and pre-feasibility costs and accruals for mine reclamation. Cash
costs are calculated and presented using the "Gold Institute Production Cost
Standard" applied consistently for all periods presented.

     Total cash costs per ounce is a non-GAAP measurement and investors are
cautioned not to place undue reliance on it and are urged to read all GAAP
accounting disclosures presented in the consolidated financial statements and
accompanying footnotes. In addition, see the reconciliation of "cash costs" to
production costs under "Results of Operations - Costs and Expenses" set forth
below:


                                       20


Operating Highlights

South America

     Cerro Bayo (Chile). At Coeur's Cerro Bayo property (formerly the Fachinal
mine) in Southern Chile, the mine produced 1.3 million ounces of silver and
14,500 ounces of gold during the second quarter of 2003. Total cash costs for
the latest three-month period was $1.33 per ounce. See "Cost and Expenses"
below.

     Exploration at Cerro Bayo during the second quarter focused on
reserve/resource delineation drilling of the Javiera, Wendy and Tranque Norte
veins. Results from the drilling are expected to produce additional reserves and
mineralized material. General reconnaissance exploration was also carried out on
Coeur's properties in the Santa Cruz Province of Argentina. Results obtained
from drilling adjacent to the R-4 Zone on the Martha mine property and on the
Malbec property located 10 miles north of the Martha mine have indicated the
presence of mineralized zones.

     Production at Mina Martha progressed as planned. During the quarter, ore
was mines from the open pit and underground workings. During April, open pit
mining was completed. Development was not started in the R-4 zone until May.

North America

     Rochester Mine (Nevada). Coeur's Rochester mine produced 1.4 million ounces
of silver and 15,100 ounces of gold, during the second quarter of 2003 compared
to 1.6 million ounces of silver and 17,100 ounces of gold in the second quarter
of the prior year. Total cash costs for the latest three-month period increased
to $4.33 per ounce as compared to $2.88 in the second quarter of 2002.
Production in the second quarter of 2003 as compared to the second quarter of
2002 was down and costs per ounce were higher as a result of the placement of
lower grade ore on the leach pad, construction activities associated with the
crusher relocation project, construction of a new off-pad haul road and ongoing
reclamation activities. As a result, pit ore to the crusher was replaced with
low-grade stockpiled ore, which ultimately reduced ounce production. With all
non-production related activities complete, pit production will resume as
planned and ounce production is expected to increase over the next several
quarters.

     Coeur Silver Valley - Galena Mine (Idaho). In the latest quarter, silver
production from Coeur Silver Valley was 1.1 million ounces, down from the 1.4
million ounces produced in the second quarter of 2002. Total cash costs for the
current quarter rose to $4.73 per ounce compared to $4.14 per ounce in the
second quarter of the prior year. During the most recent quarter, mining
operations were hampered by difficult ground conditions near the 117 vein and
lower than expected grades from trackless mining operations. Measures have been
taken to address these short-term issues and to develop an operational base for
future productivity improvements. Coeur initiated a major exploration program at
the Galena mine during the first quarter of 2003. Exploration drilling has thus
far focused on the down dip extension of the 164 vein from the 4900 level and
the down dip extension of the silver vein from the 2400 level. Drilling of other
targets located in the `upper country' as well as from the 5500 level are
planned during the remainder 2003.

Exploration and Development stage Projects

     San Bartolome (Bolivia). The final feasibility study at the San Bartolome
silver project near Potosi, Bolivia is scheduled for completion in the third
quarter of 2003. The Company recently completed an independent ore reserves
report for the San Bartolome project. As a result, the previously reported
mineralized material containing 40.3 million tons of ore with an average grade
of 3.14 per ton has been reclassified to proven and probable ore reserves of
35.3 million tons with an average grade of 3.58 ounces of silver per ton
resulting in 126 million ounces of contained silver.


                                       21


RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 Three Months Ended June 30, 2003 Compared to Three Months Ended June 30, 2002

Revenues

     Sales of metal in the second quarter of 2003 increased by $6.2 million, or
32%, from the second quarter of 2002 to $25.7 million. The increase in product
sales of metal is primarily attributable to increased production of silver and
gold.

     In the second quarter of 2003, the Company produced a total of 3.8 million
ounces of silver and 30,000 ounces of gold, compared to 3.3 million ounces of
silver and 23,000 ounces of gold in the second quarter of 2002. In the second
quarter of 2003, the Company sold 3.6 million ounces of silver and 33,000 ounces
of gold compared to 3.1 million ounces of silver and 19,000 ounces of gold for
the same period in 2002. The increase in silver and gold production is the
result of the start-up of operations at the Cerro Bayo and Martha Mines in the
second quarter of 2002, which accounted for 1.3 million ounces of silver
production and 14,500 ounces of gold production during the second quarter of
2003. Realized silver and gold prices were $4.53 and $330 per ounce,
respectively, in the second quarter of 2003 compared to $4.77 and $304 in the
comparable quarter of 2002.

     Interest and other income in the second quarter of 2003 decreased by $2.1
million compared with the second quarter of 2002. The decrease was primarily due
to a gain of $1.5 million from a business interruption claim at the Galena mine
and $1.0 million from sales of Pan American stock partially offset by $0.4
million in foreign exchange variations in the second quarter of 2002.

Costs and Expenses

     Production costs in the second quarter of 2003 increased by $2.8 million,
or 17%, from the second quarter of 2002 to $19.0 million. The increase is the
result of an increase in production costs at the Cerro Bayo mine associated with
increased metal production of approximately 1.1 million ounces for $6.8 million,
increased production costs at Silver Valley of $0.4 million and lower production
costs at the Rochester mine of $4.4 million, because of lower production.

     The following tables present a reconciliation between cash costs per ounce
and GAAP production costs reported in the Statement of Operations:


Three months ended June 30, 2003

                                      Rochester    Silver Valley   Cerro Bayo(1)      Total
                                     -----------   -------------   -------------   -----------
                                                                       
Production of Silver (ounces)         1,353,346      1,060,696       1,347,745      3,761,787

Cash Costs per ounce                 $     4.33     $     4.73      $     1.33     $     3.37
                                     ----------     ----------      ----------     ----------

Total Cash Costs (thousands)         $    5,861     $    5,021      $    1,786     $   12,668

Add/(Subtract):
  Third Party Smelting Costs               (193)        (1,287)         (1,027)        (2,507)
  By-Product Credit                       5,281            585           5,019         10,885
  Deferred Stripping Adjustment             (80)          --              --              (80)
  Change in Inventory                    (2,025)           330            (258)        (1,953)
                                     ----------     ----------      ----------     ----------
Production Costs                     $    8,844     $    4,649      $    5,520     $   19,013
                                     ==========     ==========      ==========     ==========



                                       22



Three months ended June 30, 2002

                                      Rochester    Silver Valley   Cerro Bayo(1)      Total
                                     -----------   -------------   -------------   -----------
                                                                       
Production of Silver (ounces)         1,637,443      1,383,449         260,543      3,281,435

Cash Costs per ounce                 $    $2.88     $     4.14      $     1.39     $     3.29
                                     ----------     ----------      ----------     ----------

Total Cash Costs (thousands)         $    4,718     $    5,728      $      363     $   10,809

Add/Subtract:
   Third Party Smelting Costs              (243)        (1,939)              -         (2,182)
   By-Product Credit                      5,337            792           1,873          8,002
   Deferred Stripping Adjustment            (68)             -               -            (68)
   Change in Inventory                    3,499           (271)         (3,527)          (299)
                                     ----------     ----------      ----------     ----------
Production Costs                     $   13,243     $    4,310      $   (1,291)    $   16,262
                                     ==========     ==========      ==========     ==========

(1)  The Cerro Bayo mine commenced production in the second quarter of 2002.


Other Expenses

     Depreciation and amortization increased in the second quarter of 2003 by
$1.1 million, from the prior year's second quarter, primarily due to increased
depletion recorded at the Cerro Bayo mine in conjunction with commencement of
commercial production at the mine during the second quarter of 2002.

     Administrative and general expenses decreased in the second quarter of 2003
compared to the same period in 2002 by $0.1 million due to increased financing
activities associated with the 9% Notes.

     Exploration expenses increased by $0.1 million in the second quarter of
2003 compared to the same period in 2002 as a result of the Company's expanded
exploration activities in the Cerro Bayo/Martha mine property areas.

     Pre-feasibility expenses decreased by $0.6 million due to lower
pre-feasibility expenses on the San Bartolome project in the second quarter of
2003 as compared to the same quarter of 2002.

     Interest expense decreased in the second quarter of 2003 compared with the
second quarter of 2002 to $2.0 million from $5.4 million as a result of a
decrease in the Company's overall debt level.

     During the second quarter of 2003, the Company recorded a loss on the early
retirement of debt of $0.1 million compared to a loss of $2.7 million recorded
in the same period of 2002.

Net Loss

     As a result of the aforementioned factors, the Company's net loss amounted
to $4.4 million, or $0.03 per share, in the second quarter of 2003 compared to a
net loss of $10.9 million, or $0.16 per share, in the second quarter of 2002.

    Six Months Ended June 30, 2003 Compared to Six Months Ended June 30, 2002

Revenues

     Sales of metal in the six months ended June 30, 2003 increased by $18.7
million, or 52%, from the same period of 2002 to $54.7 million. The increase in
product sales of metal is attributable to increased production of silver and
gold which accounted for $16.6 million, or 89%, of the increase, and higher
realized gold prices which accounted for $2.1 million, or 11%, of the increase.

                                       23


     In the six months ended June 30, 2003, the Company produced a total of 7.4
million ounces of silver and 62,800 ounces of gold, compared to 6.2 million
ounces of silver and 39,500 ounces of gold in the six months ended June 30,
2002. In the six months ended June 30, 2003, the Company sold 7.8 million ounces
of silver and 68,000 ounces of gold compared to 6.0 million ounces of silver and
36,000 ounces of gold for the same period in 2002. The increase in silver and
gold production is the result of the start-up of operations at the Cerro Bayo
and Martha Mines in the second quarter of 2002, which accounted for 2.6 million
ounces of silver production and 37,000 ounces of gold production during the
first half of 2003. Realized silver and gold prices were $4.65 and $336 per
ounce, respectively, in the six months ended June 30, 2003 compared to $4.64 and
$298 in the comparable period of 2002.

     Interest and other income in the six months ended June 30, 2003 decreased
by $2.3 million compared with the same period of 2002. The decrease was
primarily due to a gain of $1.5 million from a business interruption claim at
the Galena mine and $1.0 million from sales of Pan American stock partially
offset by $0.4 million in foreign exchange variations in the second quarter of
2002.

Costs and Expenses

     Production costs in the six months ended June 30, 2003 increased by $2.6
million, or 8%, from the six months ended June 30, 2002 to $36.9 million. The
increase is the result of an increase in production costs at the Cerro Bayo mine
of $11.4 million associated with higher production levels and lower production
costs at the Rochester and Silver Valley mines of $8.7 million and $0.1 million,
respectively.

     The following tables present a reconciliation between cash costs per ounce
and GAAP production costs reported in the Statement of Operations:


Six months ended June 30, 2003

                                      Rochester    Silver Valley   Cerro Bayo(1)      Total
                                     -----------   -------------   -------------   -----------
                                                                       
Production of Silver (ounces)         2,443,046      2,296,467       2,625,202      7,364,715

Cash Costs per ounce                 $     5.28     $     4.46      $     0.54     $    3.33
                                     ----------     ----------      ----------     ----------

Total Cash Costs (thousands)         $   12,900     $   10,237      $    1,412     $   24,549

Add/(Subtract):
   Third Party Smelting Costs              (366)        (2,882)         (3,021)        (6,269)
   By-Product Credit                      9,058          1,324          12,943         23,325
   Deferred Stripping Adjustment           (161)             -               -           (161)
   Change in Inventory                   (3,832)           454          (1,175)        (4,553)
                                     ----------     ----------      ----------     ----------
Production Costs                     $   17,599     $    9,133      $   10,159     $   36,891
                                     ==========     ==========      ==========     ==========

Six months ended June 30, 2002
                                      Rochester    Silver Valley   Cerro Bayo(1)      Total
                                     -----------   -------------   -------------   -----------
Production of Silver (ounces)         3,053,210      2,856,991         260,543      6,170,744

Cash Costs per ounce                 $     3.27     $     4.05      $     1.39     $     3.55
                                     ----------     ----------      ----------     ----------

Total Cash Costs (thousands)         $   9,970      $   11,582      $      363     $   21,915

Add/Subtract:
   Third Party Smelting Costs              (484)        (4,010)              -         (4,494)
   By-Product Credit                     10,107          1,683           1,874         13,664
   Deferred Stripping Adjustment           (117)             -               -           (117)
   Change in Inventory                    6,819             17          (3,528)         3,308
                                     ----------     ----------      ----------     ----------
Production Costs                     $  26,295      $    9,272      $   (1,291)    $   34,276
                                     ==========     ==========      ==========     ==========

(1)  The Cerro Bayo mine commenced production in the second quarter of 2002.


                                       24


Other Expenses

     Depreciation and amortization increased in the six months ended June 30,
2003 by $4.3 million, from the prior year's comparable period, primarily due to
increased depletion recorded at the Cerro Bayo mine in conjunction with
commencement of commercial production at the mine.

     Administrative and general expenses increased in the six months ended June
30, 2003 compared to the same period in 2002 by $0.9 million due to increased
financing activities.

     Exploration expenses increased by $0.6 million in the six months ended June
30, 2003 compared to the same period in 2002 as a result of the Company's
expanded exploration activities in the Cerro Bayo/Martha mine property areas.

     Pre-feasibility expenses decreased by $1.0 million due to lower
pre-feasibility expenses on the San Bartolome project in six months ended June
30, 2003 as compared to the same period of 2002.

     Interest expense decreased in the six months ended June 30, 2003 compared
with the six months ended June 30, 2002 to $4.0 million from $9.8 million as a
result of a decrease in the Company's overall debt level because of exchanges of
debt for equity.

     During the six months ended June 30, 2003, the Company recorded a loss on
the early retirement of debt of $28.2 million compared to $2.9 million recorded
in the same period of 2002.

Cumulative Effect of Accounting Change

     Effective with the first quarter of 2003, the Company changed the
methodology used to recognize reclamation expense pursuant to Statement of
Financial Accounting Standards No. 143, "Accounting for Asset Retirement
Obligations. Prior to 2003, the Company recognized a pro rata share of the
future estimated reclamation liability on a units-of-production basis. After
January 1, 2003, companies are required to recognize the full discounted
estimated future reclamation liability and set up a corresponding asset to be
amortized over the life of the mine on a units-of-production basis. The impact
of this change was accounted for as a change in accounting principle in the
first year of implementation and resulted in a charge of $2.3 million in the
first quarter of 2003. (See "Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates -
Reclamation and Remediation Costs" below.)

Net Loss

     As a result of the aforementioned factors, the Company's net loss amounted
to $35.6 million, or $0.26 per share, in the six months ended June 30, 2003
compared to a net loss of $22.8 million, or $0.38 per share, in the same period
of 2002.


LIQUIDITY AND CAPITAL RESOURCES

Working Capital; Cash and Cash Equivalents

     The Company's working capital at June 30, 2003, increased by $14.5 million
to approximately $20.8 million compared to $6.6 million at December 31, 2002.
The increase was primarily attributed to $24 million of cash provided by
financing activities. The ratio of current assets to current liabilities was 1.6
to 1.0 at June 30, 2003 compared to 1.2 to 1.0 at December 31, 2002.

     Net cash used in operating activities in the three months ended June 30,
2003 was $3.0 million compared to net cash provided by operating activities of
$0.1 million in the three months ended June 30, 2002. The decrease in operating
cash flow of $3.1 million is primarily the result of increased inventory levels
associated with increased


                                       25


production levels at the Cerro Bayo/Martha Mines. Net cash provided by investing
activities in the second quarter of 2003 was $15.1 million compared to net cash
used in investing activities of $1.4 million in the prior year's comparable
period. The increase in cash provided by investing activities primarily resulted
from an increase in short-term investments purchased with the proceeds from the
issuance of the 9% Notes. Net cash used in financing activities was $11.9
million in the second quarter of 2003, compared to cash provided of $4.6 million
in the second quarter of 2002. The decrease was primarily a result of retirement
of debt of $22.4 million offset by proceeds on issuance of common stock of $11.5
million. As a result of the above, cash and cash equivalents increased by $0.2
million in the second quarter of 2003 compared to an increase of $3.2 million
for the comparable period in 2002.

     Net cash used in operating activities in the six months ended June 30, 2003
was $4.3 million compared to net cash used in operating activities of $5.4
million in the six months ended June 30, 2002. The increase in operating cash
flow of $1.1 million is primarily the result of increased inventory levels
associated with increased production levels at the Cerro Bayo/Martha Mines. Net
cash used in investing activities in the six months ended June 30, 2003 was $9.2
million compared to net cash used in investing activities of $1.8 million in the
prior year's comparable period. The increase in cash used in investing
activities primarily resulted from an increase in capital expenditures at the
Cerro Bayo and Rochester mines. Net cash provided by financing activities was
$24.0 million in the six months ended June 30, 2003, compared to cash provided
of $4.5 million in the same period of the prior year. The increase was primarily
a result of proceeds on issuance of common stock of $11.5 million and proceeds
on the issuance of long-term debt of $33.3 million offset in part by retirement
of debt of $22.4 million. As a result of the above, cash and cash equivalents
increased by $10.4 million in the first half of 2003 compared to decrease of
$2.8 million for the comparable period in 2002.

Debt and Capital Resources

     The Company has improved its working capital position since December 31,
2002 by completing the issuance of $37.2 million of the 9% Convertible Senior
Subordinated Notes due February 2007 (the "9% Notes"). The Company will continue
to make debt reduction and/or restructuring one of its primary objectives during
the next twelve months and believes its debt may be further reduced by
additional conversions of 13 3/8% Notes into common equity during the remainder
of this year. The Company also received proceeds of $11.5 million from the sale
of common stock in the second quarter of 2003. At June 30, 2003, the Company had
$19.5 million of cash and approximately $5.4 million available under its working
capital facility. Production ounces and production costs are near budget for the
year. Management therefore believes that its existing and available cash and
cash flow from operations will allow it to meet its obligations for the next
twelve months. However, the Company may continue to seek various forms of
financing in the future.

2003 Exchanges and Conversions

     During the six months ended June 30, 2003, the holders of an additional
$2.8 million principal amount of the Series I 13 3/8% Convertible Senior
Subordinated Notes due December 31, 2003 (the "Series I 13 3/8% Notes")
converted their notes, under their original terms, into a total of 2.2 million
shares of common stock, including make whole interest payments.

     During the six months ended June 30, 2003, the holders of the 6 3/8%
Debentures due January 2004 (the "6 3/8% Debentures") exchanged $26.9 million
principal amount for 15.8 million shares of common stock and holders of the 7
1/4% Debentures due October 2005 (the "7% Debentures") exchanged $1.7 million
principal amount for 1.1 shares of common stock. In connection with these
exchanges, the Company reported a loss on the early retirement of debt of $28.2
million in the first half of 2003.

                                       26


Issuance of 9% Convertible Senior Subordinated Notes

     On February 26, 2003, the Company completed a private placement of $37.2
million principal amount of 9% Notes. The net proceeds were approximately $33.3
million. The 9% Notes are senior in right of payment to the 6 3/8% and 7 1/4%
Debentures. The 9% Notes are convertible into Coeur common stock, at any time
prior to maturity at a conversion price of $1.60 per share, subject to
adjustment. Interest is payable semi-annually on February 15 and August 15 of
each year. The Company is entitled to elect to pay interest in cash or stock, in
its sole discretion. The 9% Notes are redeemable at the option of the Company
six months after issuance, subject to certain conditions, and at the option of
the holders in the event of a change in control. Of the financial advisory fees
paid by the Company in connection with the issuance of the 9% Notes, the Company
elected to issue 0.6 million unregistered shares of common stock valued at $1.54
per share in lieu of cash.

     On March 7, 2003, the Company called for the redemption of approximately
$22.4 million principal amount of the outstanding 6 3/8% Debentures. The debt
was retired on April 7, 2003.

Issuance of Common Stock

     On May 23, 2003, the Company sold 8.1 million shares of common stock to an
institutional investor for an aggregate of $10 million, or $1.23 per share. The
Company also granted the investor an option, exercisable within 30 days, to
purchase an additional 1.2 million shares of common stock at a price of $1.23
per share. The proceeds of the sale were used for general corporate purposes and
working capital needs, including the repayment of 13 3/8% Notes and 6 3/8%
Debentures. On June 20, 2003, the Company sold 1.2 million shares of common
stock to the institutional investor for an aggregate of $1.5 million, or $1.23
per share, in connection with the above-referenced option. The sales of shares
were effected under the Company's shelf registration statement.

Subsequent Events

     Effective as of July 10, 2003, Coeur d'Alene Mines Corporation entered into
a series of agreements under which indebtedness of the Company will be exchanged
for or converted into shares of the Company's common stock, (the "Common
Stock"). The Company and each of the holders of the Company's 9% Notes entered
into an Early Conversion Agreement. The amount of principal to be converted
under the Early Conversion Agreements is $32.6 million, and the common shares to
be issued, including interest, is approximately 27.5 million. After giving
effect to the exchanges contemplated by the Early Conversion Agreements, an
aggregate of $4.6 million of 9% Notes will remain outstanding. The Company
expects to record an estimated loss on early retirement of debt of $4.3 million
in the third quarter of 2003 in conjunction with these transactions.

     In connection with the Early Conversion Agreements, the Company, the
holders of the 9% Notes and the trustee under the indenture with respect to the
9% Notes also amended such indenture. The amendments are set forth in a
Supplemental Indenture, dated July 15, 2003. Together with the Early Conversion
Agreements, the Supplemental Indenture provides that:

     (i) the holders of the remaining 9% Notes will not convert such 9% Notes
     until the earlier of the Company's next annual shareholders meeting, at
     which time the approval of the Company's shareholders to issue shares in
     excess of the NYSE 20% limitation will be sought, or June 30, 2004;

     (ii) until that time, or if the stockholder approval is not obtained, any
     optional redemption by the Company of the remaining 9% Notes will be at a
     price equal to the greater of the current redemption price and the then
     market value of the number of shares into which the remaining 9% Notes
     would be convertible, but for the operation of the NYSE 20% limit;

                                       27


     (iii) if the stockholder approval is not obtained, holders of the 9% Notes,
     upon their election to convert, will receive, instead of shares of Common
     Stock, cash at a price equal to the then market value of the number of
     shares into which the remaining 9% Notes would be convertible, but for the
     operation of the NYSE 20% limit; and

     (iv) each holder of 9% Notes agreed not to transfer more than 2 million
     shares of Common Stock to any transferee in one transaction or a series of
     transactions.

     In other exchanges subsequent to June 30, 2003, the Company issued an
aggregate of 0.8 million shares of common stock for $1.0 million principal
amount of the Company's 6 3/8% Debentures, and an aggregate of 0.3 million
shares of common stock for $0.4 million principal amount of the Company's 7 1/4%
Debentures. The Company expects to record a loss on early retirement of debt of
$1.5 million in the third quarter of 2003 in conjunction with these transaction.

     On July 7, 2003, the Company sold 0.2 million shares of common stock to an
institutional investor for an aggregate of $0.3 million, or $1.40 per share. The
net proceeds from the sale of shares were used to pay amounts owed by the
Company's subsidiary, Empresa Minera Manquiri S.A., a Bolivian corporation,
under contracts pursuant to which it obtained certain mineral rights in Bolivia
and for general corporate purposes. The sale of share was effected pursuant to
the Company's shelf registration statement.

Litigation and Other Events

Federal Natural Resources Action

     On March 22, 1996, an action was filed in the United States District Court
for the District of Idaho by the United States against various defendants,
including the Company, asserting claims under CERCLA and the Clean Water Act for
alleged damages to federal natural resources in the Coeur d'Alene River Basin of
Northern Idaho as a result of alleged releases of hazardous substances from
mining activities conducted in the area since the late 1800s.

     On March 16, 2001, the Company and representatives of the U.S. Government,
including the Environmental Protection Agency, the Department of Interior and
the Department of Agriculture, reached an agreement in principle to settle the
lawsuit, which represents the only suit in which the Company has been named as a
party. Pursuant to the terms of the Consent Decree, dated May 14, 2001, the
Company has paid the U.S. Government a total of approximately $3.9 million, of
which $3.3 million was paid in May 2001 and the remaining $.6 million was paid
in June 2001. In addition, the Company will (i) pay the United States 50% of any
future recoveries from insurance companies for claims for defense and
indemnification coverage under general liability insurance policies in excess of
$0.6 million, (ii) accomplish certain cleanup work on the Mineral Point property
(i.e., the former Coeur Mine site) and Caladay property, and (iii) make
available certain real property to be used as a waste repository. Finally,
commencing five years after effectiveness of the settlement and continuing for
15 years thereafter, the Company will be obligated to pay net smelter royalties
on its operating properties, up to a maximum of $3 million, amounting to a 2%
net smelter royalty on silver production if the price of silver exceeds $6.50
per ounce, and a $5.00 per ounce net smelter royalty on gold production if the
price of gold exceeds $325 per ounce. The Company recorded $4.2 million of
expenses, which included $3.9 million of settlement payments, in the fourth
quarter of 2000 in connection with the settlement.


                                       28


Lawsuit to Recover Inventory

     During the first quarter of 2000, Handy & Harman Refining Group, Inc.
("Handy & Harman"), to which the Rochester Mine had historically sent
approximately 50% of its dore, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy. The Company had
inventory at the refinery of approximately 67,000 ounces of silver and 5,000
ounces of gold that had been delivered to certain creditors of Handy & Harman.
On February 27, 2001 the Company commenced a lawsuit against Handy & Harman and
certain others in the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the District of Connecticut
seeking recovery of the metals and/or damages. Handy & Harman's Chapter 11
liquidation plan was confirmed by the Bankruptcy Court in August 2001 and on
November 3, 2001, the Company received approximately $294,000 from Handy &
Harman as a partial payment under the plan. This suit has been settled by a
payment to the Company in the amount of $50,000. The liquidating custodian of
Handy & Harman under the liquidation plan filed suit against the Company in
March 2002 for the value of 100,000 ounces of silver (i.e., approximately
$500,000) as a preference based on the Company's draw-down of its silver held by
Handy & Harman in mid-March 2000. Based on this legal action, the Company
determined that the recovery of any additional amounts would be remote. As a
result, the Company recorded a $1.4 million write-down of the remaining carrying
amount in the fourth quarter of 2001. Settlement negotiations resulted in an
agreement with the liquidating custodian for settlement of his claim. The sum of
$70,000 will be paid by the Company. This payment will be deducted from a
payment due to the Company in the amount of approximately $222,000. On July 10,
2003, the court approved the settlement. The appeal period for the order is 10
days following its entry.

Private Property Damage Action

     On January 7, 2002, a private class action suit captioned Baugh v. Asarco,
et al., was filed in the Idaho District Court for the First District (Lawsuit
No. 2002131) in Kootenai County, Idaho against the companies that have been
defendants in the prior Bunker Hill and natural resources litigation in the
Coeur d'Alene Basin, including the Company, by eight northern Idaho residents
seeking medical benefits and real property damages from the mining companies
involved in the Bunker Hill Superfund site. In October 2002, the court conducted
a hearing on motions resulting in an order striking certain of the alleged
causes of action from the complaint, and dismissing the complaint with leave to
amend it. In January 2003, the plaintiffs filed an amended complaint. Certain of
the defendants, including the Company, filed motions to dismiss the complaint.
The court struck the amended complaint and a second amended complaint has been
filed. While the Company believes the suit is without merit, at this early stage
of the proceedings, the Company cannot predict the outcome of this suit.

State of Maine and State of Idaho Superfund Sites Related to Callahan Mining
Corporation

     During 2001, the United States Forest Service made a formal request for
information regarding the Deadwood Mine Site located in central Idaho. Callahan
Mining Corporation had operated at this site during the 1940's. The Forest
Service believes that some cleanup action is required at the location. However,
Coeur d'Alene Mines Corporation did not acquire Callahan until 1991, more than
40 years after Callahan disposed of its interest in the Deadwood property. The
Company did not make any decisions with respect to generation, transport or
disposal of hazardous waste at the site. Therefore, it is believed that the
Company is not liable for any cleanup, and if Callahan might be liable, it has
no substantial assets with which to satisfy any such liability. To date no claim
has been made by the United States for any dollar amount of cleanup costs
against either the Company or Callahan.

                                       29


     During 2002, the EPA made a formal request for information regarding a
Callahan mine site in the State of Maine. Callahan operated there in the late
1960's, shut the operations down in the early 1970's and disposed of the
property. The EPA contends that some cleanup action is warranted at the site,
and listed it on the National Priorities List in late 2002. The Company believes
that because it made no decisions with respect to generation, transport or
disposal of hazardous waste at this location, it is not liable for any cleanup
costs. If Callahan might have liability, it has no substantial assets with which
to satisfy such liability. To date, no claim has been made for any dollar amount
of cleanup costs against either the Company or Callahan.


RISK FACTORS

     The following information sets forth information relating to important
risks and uncertainties that could materially adversely affect the Company's
business, financial condition or operating results. References to "we," "our"
and "us" in these risk factors refer to the Company. Additional risks and
uncertainties that we do not presently know or that we currently deem immaterial
may also impair our business operations.

We have incurred losses in the last five years and expect to continue to do so.

     We have incurred net losses in the last five years, and have had losses
from continuing operations in each of those periods. Significantly contributing
to the losses were:

     o    historically low silver and gold market prices;

     o    our deliberate pursuit of a growth policy calling for the acquisition
          of mining properties and companies and financing such growth
          principally by incurring convertible indebtedness; and

     o    significant write-downs for impaired assets in 1998 ($223.2 million),
          1999 ($16.2 million), 2000 ($12.2 million), 2001 ($6.1 million) and
          2002 ($19.0 million),

     While market prices for silver and gold have recently increased, if silver
and gold prices were to remain at current levels or decline and we are unable to
reduce our production costs below prevailing price levels, our losses will
continue. Because low silver and gold prices may make mining at our properties
uneconomical, if these prices decline, we may be required to recognize
additional impairment write-downs. This would increase our operating losses.

We have not had sufficient earnings to cover fixed charges in recent years and
presently expect that situation to continue.

     As a result of our net losses, our earnings have not been adequate to
satisfy fixed charges (i.e., interest, preferred stock dividends and that
portion of rent deemed representative of interest) in each of the last five
years. The amounts by which earnings were inadequate to cover fixed charges were
approximately $227.0 million in 1998, $29.3 million in 1999, $47.5 million in
2000, $3.1 million in 2001 and $81.2 million in 2002, respectively. As of June
30, 2003, we were required to make fixed payments on the following securities:

     o    $5.9 million principal amount of our 6 3/8% Convertible Subordinated
          Debentures 2004, requiring annual interest payments of approximately
          $0.4 million until their maturity on January 31, 2004;

                                       30


     o    $9.9 million principal amount of our 7 1/4% Convertible Subordinated
          Debentures due 2005, requiring annual interest payments of
          approximately $0.7 million until their maturity on October 31, 2005;
          and

     o    $9.9 million of our Series I 13 3/8% Senior Convertible Notes due
          2003, requiring interest payments (in cash or in common stock) of
          approximately $1.3 million in December 2003.

     o    $37.2 million of our 9% Convertible Senior Subordinated Notes due
          2007, requiring annual interest payments (in cash or in common stock)
          of approximately $3.3 million until their maturity on February 26,
          2007.

     Effective as of July 10, 2003, Coeur d'Alene Mines Corporation entered into
a series of agreements under which indebtedness of the Company will be exchanged
for or converted into shares of the Company's common stock (the "Common Stock").
The total number of shares of Common Stock to be issued with respect to the
$32.6 million principal amount of 9% Notes is 27.5 million. After giving effect
to the exchanges contemplated by these agreements, an aggregate of $4.6 million
of 9% Notes will remain outstanding.

     In connection with the agreements to exchange or convert indebtedness, the
Company, the holders of the 9% Notes and the trustee under the indenture with
respect to the 9% Notes also amended such indenture. The amendments are set
forth in a Supplemental Indenture, dated July 15, 2003. Together with the
agreements, the Supplemental Indenture provides that:

          (i) the holders of the remaining 9% Notes will not convert such 9%
     Notes until the earlier of the Company's next annual shareholders meeting,
     at which time the approval of the Company's shareholders to issue shares in
     excess of the NYSE 20% limitation will be sought, or June 30, 2004;

          (ii) until that time, or if the stockholder approval is not obtained,
     any optional redemption by the Company of the remaining 9% Notes will be at
     a price equal to the greater of the current redemption price and the then
     market value of the number of shares into which the remaining 9% Notes
     would be convertible, but for the operation of the NYSE 20% limit;

          (iii) if the stockholder approval is not obtained, holders of the 9%
     Notes, upon their election to convert, will receive, instead of shares of
     Common Stock, cash at a price equal to the then market value of the number
     of shares into which the remaining 9% Notes would be convertible, but for
     the operation of the NYSE 20% limit; and

          (iv) each holder of 9% Notes agreed not to transfer more than 2
     million shares of Common Stock to any transferee in one transaction or a
     series of transactions.

     In other exchanges subsequent to June 30, 2003, the Company issued an
aggregate of .08 million shares of common stock for $1.0 million principal
amount of the Company's 6.375% Convertible Subordinated Debentures due January
2004, and an aggregate of 0.3 million shares of common stock for $0.4 million
principal amount of the Company's 7.25% Convertible Subordinated Debentures due
October 2005.

     We expect to satisfy our fixed charges and other expense obligations in the
future from cash flow from operations and, if cash flow from operations is
insufficient, from working capital, which amounted to approximately $20.8
million at June 30, 2003, and, if necessary, the sale of assets or equity or
debt securities. We have recently been experiencing negative cash flow from
operating activities. The amount of net cash used


                                       31


in our operating activities amounted to approximately $4.3 million for the first
half of 2003 and $5.4 million for the first half of 2002. The availability of
future cash flow from operations or working capital to fund the payment of
interest on our debentures and other fixed charges will be dependent upon
numerous factors, including our results of operations, silver and gold prices,
levels and costs of production at our mining properties, the amount of our
capital expenditures and expenditures for acquisitions, developmental and
exploratory activities, and the extent to which we are able to reduce the amount
of our indebtedness through additional exchanges.

The market price of silver and gold over which we have no control, is volatile
and is at a level that adversely affects us.

     Because we derive greater than 61.3% of our revenues from sales of silver
and gold, our earnings are directly related to the price of these metals.

     Silver and gold prices fluctuate widely and are affected by many factors
beyond our control, including interest rates, expectations regarding inflation,
speculation, currency values, governmental decisions regarding the disposal of
precious metals stockpiles, global and regional demand and production, political
and economic conditions and other factors.

     The market price of silver (Handy & Harman) and gold (London Final) on July
21, 2003 was $4.79 and $350 per ounce, respectively. The price of silver and
gold may decline in the future. Factors that are generally understood to
contribute to a decline in the price of silver include sales by private and
government holder, and a general global economic slowdown.

     If the prices of silver and gold become depressed for a sustained period,
our net losses will continue, we may suspend mining at one or more of our
properties until the price increases, and we may be required to record
additional asset impairment write-downs pursuant to SFAS 144 (as discussed
below).

We have recorded significant write-downs of mining properties in recent years
and may have to recognize additional write-downs in the future.

     Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 144 (SFAS 144), "Accounting
for the Impairment of Long-Lived Assets and for Long-Lived Assets to be Disposed
of," established accounting standards for impairment of the value of long-lived
assets such as mining properties. SFAS 144 require a company to review the
recoverability of its assets by estimating the future undiscounted cash flows
expected to result from the use and eventual disposition of the asset.
Impairment must be recognized when the carrying value of the asset exceeds these
cash flows.

     Recognizing impairment write-downs has negatively impacted our results of
operations in recent years. We have recorded significant write-downs of our
mining properties in recent years, amounting to $16.2 million in 1999, $12.2
million in 2000, $6.1 million in 2001 and $19.0 million in 2002. The 1999
write-downs consisted of $16.2 million at the Yilgarn Star Mine in Australia.
The 2000 write-down included an impairment of $12.2 million for our investment
in Gasgoyne Gold Mines NL. The 2001 write-down consisted of an additional
impairment of $6.1 million at the Kensington property, in addition to the $121.5
million written-off in 1998. The 2002 write-down consisted of a $19.0 million
impairment at Coeur Silver Valley.

                                       32


     While we do not believe that any of our other properties presently require
a write-down pursuant to SFAS No. 144, if silver prices become depressed for a
sustained period of time and/or we fail to reduce production costs or expand
mineable ore reserves at our mining properties, we may recognize further asset
write-downs.

     We also might have to record other types of additional mining property
write-downs in the future to the extent a property is sold by us for a price
less than the carrying value of the property or reserves have to be created in
connection with the closure and reclamation of a property.

The estimation of ore reserves is imprecise and subjective, requiring the use of
uncertain metals market prices and other assumptions. Estimated ore reserves may
not be realized in future actual production and operating results.

     The ore reserve figures presented in this report are estimates made by our
technical personnel. Reserve estimates are a function of geological and
engineering analysis and also require us to make assumptions about production
costs and silver and gold market prices. Reserve estimation is necessarily an
imprecise and subjective process and the accuracy of such estimates is a
function of the quality of available data and of engineering and geological
interpretation, judgment and experience. Assumptions about silver and gold
market prices are subject to great uncertainty as those prices have fluctuated
widely in the past. Declines in the market prices of silver or gold may render
reserves containing relatively lower grades of ore uneconomic to exploit, and we
may be required to further reduce reserve estimates, discontinue development or
mining at one or more of our properties, or write down assets as impaired.
Should we encounter mineralization or geologic formations at any of our mines or
projects different from those predicted by drilling, sampling and similar
examinations, then our reserve estimates may be adjusted and mining plans may be
altered, which may adversely affect our actual production and operating results.
Ore reserves at most of our mining properties operated by us are the subject of
verification by independent consulting geologists or mining engineers. Ore
reserves at mining properties in which we have an ownership interest but which
are operated by other companies are prepared by such companies, reviewed by us
and may not be subject to independent verification.

     Silver and gold reserves at mining properties owned by us and in which we
have an ownership interest were calculated at or about December 31, 2002. Our
ore reserve determinations were based on a silver price of $5.00 per ounce and a
gold price of $350 per ounce.

Significant risks and costs are associated with our exploration, development and
mining activities.

     Our ability to sustain or increase our present production levels depends in
part on successful exploration and development of new ore bodies and/or
expansion of existing mining operations. Mineral exploration, particularly for
silver and gold, involves many risks and frequently is not productive. If and
when mineralization is discovered, it may take a number of years until
production is possible, during which time the economic viability of the project
may change. Substantial expenditures are required to establish ore reserves,
extract the metals from the ores and, in the case of new properties, to
construct mining and processing facilities. The economic feasibility of any
individual development project and all such projects collectively is based upon,
among other things, estimates of the size and grade of ore reserves, proximity
to infrastructures and other resources (such as water and power), metallurgical
recoveries, production rates and capital and operating costs of such development
projects, and future metals prices. Development projects are also subject to the
completion of favorable feasibility studies, issuance of necessary permits and
receipt of adequate financing.

                                       33


     Development projects may have no operating history upon which to base
estimates of future operating costs and capital requirements. Particularly for
development projects, estimates of reserves, metal recoveries and cash operating
costs are to a large extent based upon the interpretation of geologic data
obtained from a limited number of drill holes and other sampling techniques and
feasibility studies. Estimates of cash operating costs are then derived based
upon anticipated tonnage and grades of ore to be mined and processed, the
configuration of the orebody, expected recovery rates of metals from the ore,
comparable facility and equipment costs, anticipated climate conditions and
other factors. As a result, actual cash operating costs and economic returns of
any and all development projects may materially differ from the costs and
returns estimated.

Our silver and gold production may decline in the future.

     Our future silver and gold production may decline as a result of the
exhaustion of reserves and possible closure of mines. It has been and will
continue to be our business strategy to conduct silver and gold exploratory
activities at our existing mining and exploratory properties as well as at new
exploratory projects, and to acquire silver and gold mining properties and/or
businesses that possess mineable ore reserves and are expected to become
operational in the near future. Although that is our business strategy, we can
provide no assurance that our silver and gold production in the future will not
decline.

There are significant risks associated with our mining activities, not all of
which are fully covered by insurance.

     The mining business is generally subject to risks and hazards, including
quantity of production, quality of the ore, environmental hazards, industrial
accidents, the encountering of unusual or unexpected geological formations,
cave-ins, flooding, earthquakes and periodic interruptions due to inclement or
hazardous weather conditions. These occurrences could result in damage to, or
destruction of, mineral properties or production facilities, personal injury or
death, environmental damage, reduced production and delays in mining, asset
write-downs, monetary losses and possible legal liability. Although we maintain
insurance in an amount that we consider to be adequate, liabilities might exceed
policy limits, in which event we could incur significant costs that could
adversely affect our results of operation. Insurance fully covering many
environmental risks (including potential liability for pollution or other
hazards as a result of disposal of waste products occurring from exploration and
production) is not generally available to us or to other companies in the
industry.

We are subject to significant environmental and other governmental regulations
that can require substantial expenses and capital expenditures.

     Our mining activities are subject to extensive federal, state, local and
foreign laws and regulations governing environmental protection, natural
resources, prospecting, development, production, post-closure reclamation,
taxes, labor standards, occupational health and safety including, mine safety,
toxic substances and other matters. Although these laws and regulations have
never required us to close any mine, the costs associated with compliance with
such laws and regulations are substantial and possible future laws and
regulations, or more stringent enforcement thereof by governmental authorities
could cause additional expense, capital expenditures, restrictions on or
suspensions of our operations and delays in the development of our properties.
Moreover, these laws and regulations allow governmental authorities and private
parties to bring lawsuits based upon damages to property and injury to persons
resulting from the environmental, health and safety impacts of our past and
current operations, and can lead to the imposition of substantial fines,
penalties and other civil and criminal sanctions. Risks of substantial costs and
liabilities, including for the restoration of the environment after the closure
of our mines, are inherent in our operations. Although we believe we are in
substantial compliance with applicable laws


                                       34


and regulations, we cannot assure you that any such law, regulation, enforcement
or private claim will not have a material adverse effect on our business,
financial condition or results of operations.

     Certain of our mining wastes are currently exempt to a limited extent from
the extensive set of federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations
governing hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act
(RCRA). If the EPA designates these wastes as hazardous under RCRA in the
future, we would be required to expend additional amounts on the handling of
such wastes and to make significant expenditures on the construction of
hazardous waste disposal facilities. In addition, regardless of whether these
wastes are designated as hazardous under RCRA, if they cause contamination in or
damage to the environment at a mining facility, such facility may be designated
as a "Superfund" site under the Comprehensive Environmental Response,
Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). Under CERCLA, any owner or operator of
a Superfund site since the time of its contamination may be held liable and may
be forced to undertake extensive remedial cleanup action or to pay for the
government's cleanup efforts. Additional regulations or requirements are also
imposed upon our tailings and waste disposal areas in Idaho and Alaska under the
federal Clean Water Act (CWA) and in Nevada under the Nevada Water Pollution
Control Law which incorporates the CWA. Airborne emissions are subject to
controls under the air pollution statutes implementing the Clean Air Act in
Nevada, Idaho and Alaska. In the context of environmental permitting, including
the approval of reclamation plans, we must comply with standards and regulations
which entail significant costs and can entail significant delays.

Significant risks are associated with our foreign operations and activities.

     Chile, Argentina and Bolivia are the most significant foreign countries in
which we directly or indirectly own or operate mining properties or
developmental projects. We also conduct exploratory projects in Chile, Argentina
and Bolivia. Although the governments and economies of these countries have been
relatively stable in recent years, property ownership in a foreign country
generally is subject to the risk of expropriation or nationalization with
inadequate compensation. Any foreign operations or investment may also be
adversely affected by exchange controls, currency fluctuations, taxation and
laws or policies of particular countries as well as laws and policies of the
United States affecting foreign trade investment and taxation.

There are significant risks associated with any future acquisitions by us.

     An important element of our business strategy has been the opportunistic
acquisition of silver and gold mines, properties and businesses. While it is our
practice to engage independent mining consultants to assist in evaluating and
making acquisitions, mining properties acquired by us in the future might not be
developed profitably or, if profitable when acquired, that profitability might
not be sustained. In connection with any future acquisitions, we may incur
indebtedness or issue equity securities, resulting in dilution of the percentage
ownership of existing shareholders. We intend to seek shareholder approval for
any such acquisitions only to the extent required by applicable law, regulations
or stock exchange rules.

Finding and acquiring new mineral properties is very difficult and competitive.

     Because mines have limited lives based on proven and probable ore reserves,
we, like other mining companies are continually seeking to replace and expand
our ore reserves. Identifying promising mining properties is difficult.
Furthermore, we encounter strong competition from other mining companies in
connection with the acquisition of properties producing or capable of producing
silver and gold. Many of these companies


                                       35


have greater financial resources than we do. Consequently, we may be unable to
replace and expand current ore reserves through the acquisition of new mining
properties on terms we consider acceptable.

Significant risks are associated with our purchases of currencies of foreign
countries in which we do business.

     We may enter into agreements which require us to purchase currencies of
foreign countries in which we do business in order to ensure fixed exchange
rates. In the event that actual exchange rates vary from those set forth in the
hedge contracts, we will experience U.S. dollar-denominated currency gains or
losses.

We will have to use some of our cash to provide financial assurance relating to
our Rochester Mine's future reclamation liability.

     The insurance company that issued the surety bond required under Nevada law
to cover our estimated $21.8 million of future mine closure reclamation costs
relating to the Rochester Mine filed for liquidation in the first quarter of
2001. We have reached an agreement with this insurance company and the State of
Nevada regarding financial assurance for reclamation costs at the Rochester
Mine. This settlement requires us to make an initial payment of a premium at
policy inception, a large portion of which is placed in a "Reclamation"
Experience account (R.E.A.) intended to pay for the reclamation expenses insured
under the policy as they occur. The policy is also designed to provide the
insured mine owner with the benefit of regulatory risk transfer by providing a
limit of liability that is significantly greater than the estimated reclamation
cost at policy inception. We estimate that the annual funding required by the
settlement will be approximately $1.8 million, which adversely affects our
working capital position.

Third parties may dispute our unpatented mining claims.

     The validity of unpatented mining claims, which constitute a significant
portion of our property holdings in the United States, is often uncertain and
may be contested. Although we have attempted to acquire satisfactory title to
undeveloped properties, we, in accordance with mining industry practice, do not
generally obtain title opinions until a decision is made to develop a property,
with the attendant risk that some titles, particularly titles to undeveloped
properties, may be defective.

We are required to obtain government permits to expand operations or begin new
operations, which is often a costly and time-consuming process.

     Mining companies are required to seek governmental permits for expansion of
existing operations or for the commencement of new operations. Obtaining the
necessary governmental permits is a complex and time-consuming process involving
numerous jurisdictions and often involving public hearings and costly
undertakings on our part. The duration and success of permitting efforts are
contingent on many factors that are out of our control. Government permitting
may increase costs and cause delays depending on the nature of the activity to
be permitted, and in an extreme case, could cause us to not proceed with the
development of a mine.

The market price of our common stock could decrease as a result of the impact of
an increase in the number of our outstanding shares that may result from
issuances of shares in exchange for our outstanding convertible debt.

     We may, from time to time, enter into exchange transactions with holders of
our outstanding convertible debt involving the issuance of additional shares of
common stock. The impact of the issuance of a significant amount of common stock
may place downward pressure on the market price of the common stock.

                                       36


The market price of our common stock has been volatile and may decline.

     The market price of our common stock has been volatile and may decline in
the future. The high and low closing sale prices of our common stock were $4.13
and $0.81 per share in 2000, $1.23 and $0.87 in 2001 and $2.50 and $0.78 in
2002. The closing sale price at July 21, 2003 was $1.51 per share.

The market price of our common stock historically has fluctuated widely and been
affected by many factors beyond our control. These factors include:

     o    the market prices of silver and gold;
     o    general stock market conditions;
     o    interest rates;
     o    expectations regarding inflation;
     o    currency values; and
     o    global and regional political and economic conditions and other
          factors.

We do not anticipate paying dividends on the common stock.

     We do not anticipate paying any cash dividends on the common stock at this
time. Therefore, holders of the common stock will likely not receive a dividend
return on their investment and there is a significant likelihood that holders of
the common stock will not realize any value through the receipt of cash
dividends.

We are subject to anti-takeover provisions in our charter and in our contracts
that could delay or prevent an acquisition of us even if such an acquisition
would be beneficial to our shareholders.

     Certain provisions of our articles of incorporation and our contracts could
delay or prevent a third party from acquiring us, even if doing so might be
beneficial to our shareholders. Some of these provisions:

     o    authorize the issuance of preferred stock which can be created and
          issued by the Board of Directors without prior shareholder approval,
          commonly referred to as "blank check" preferred stock, with rights
          senior to those of the common stock; and

     o    require that a "fair price" be paid in such business transactions.

     We have also implemented a shareholder rights plan which could delay or
prevent a third party from acquiring us.

The uncertainties inherent in estimating inventory mean that our estimates of
current and non-current inventories may not be realized in future actual
production and operating results.

     We use estimates, based on prior production results and experiences, to
determine whether heap leach inventory will be recovered more than one year in
the future, and is non-current inventory, or will be recovered within one year,
and is current inventory. The estimates involve assumptions that may not prove
to be consistent with our actual production and operating results. We cannot
determine the amount ultimately recoverable until leaching is completed.

CRITICAL ACCOUNTING POLICIES AND ESTIMATES

     Our consolidated financial statements are impacted by the accounting
policies used and the estimates and assumptions made by management during their
preparation. We have identified the policies below as critical to our business
operations and the understanding of our results of operations. The impact and
any associated risks related to these policies on our business operations is
discussed throughout Management's Discussion and


                                       37


Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations where such policies
affect our reported and expected financial results. For a detailed discussion on
the application of these and other accounting policies, see Note B in the Notes
to the Consolidated Financial Statements of this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q.
Note that our preparation of this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q requires us to
make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amount of assets and
liabilities, disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of our
financial statements, and the reported amounts of revenue and expenses during
the reporting period. There can be no assurance that actual results will not
differ from those estimates. The most critical accounting principles upon which
the Company's financial status depends are those requiring estimates of
recoverable ounces from proven and probable reserves and/or assumptions of
future commodity prices. Such estimates and assumptions affect the value of
inventories (which are stated at the lower of average cost or net realizable
value) and the potential impairment of long-lived assets. These estimates and
assumptions also affect the rate at which depreciation and amortization are
charged to earnings.

Ore on Leach Pad

     The Rochester Mine utilizes the heap leach process to extract silver and
gold from ore. The heap leach process is a process of extracting silver and gold
by placing ore on an impermeable pad and applying a diluted cyanide solution
that dissolves a portion of the contained silver and gold, which are then
recovered in metallurgical processes.

     The key stages in the conversion of ore into silver and gold are (i) the
blasting process in which the ore is broken into large pieces; (ii) the
processing of the ore through a crushing facility that breaks it into smaller
pieces; (iii) the transportation of the crushed ore to the leach pad where the
leaching solution is applied; (iv) the collection of the leach solution; (v)
subjecting the leach solution to the precipitation process, in which gold and
silver is converted back to a fine solid; (vi) the conversion of the precipitate
into dore; and (vii) the conversion by a third party refinery of the dore into
refined silver and gold bullion.

     We use several integrated steps to scientifically measure the metal content
of ore placed on the leach pads during the key stages. As the ore body is
drilled in preparation for the blasting process, samples of the drill residue
are assayed to determine estimated quantities of contained metal. We estimate
the quantity of ore by utilizing global positioning satellite survey techniques.
We then process the ore through a crushing facility where the output is again
weighed and sampled for assaying. A metallurgical reconciliation with the data
collected from the mining operation is completed with appropriate adjustments
made to previous estimates. We then transport the crushed ore to the leach pad
for application of the leaching solution. As the leach solution is collected
from the leach pads, we continuously sample for assaying. We measure the
quantity of leach solution by flow meters throughout the leaching and
precipitation process. After precipitation, the product is converted to dore,
which is the final product produced by the mine. We again sample and assay the
dore. Finally, a third party smelter converts the dore into refined silver and
gold bullion. At this point we are able to determine final ounces of silver and
gold available for sale. We then review this end result and reconcile it to the
estimates we had used and developed throughout the production process. Based on
this review, we adjust our estimation procedures when appropriate.

     Our reported inventories include metals estimated to be contained in the
ore on the leach pads of $31.2 million as of June 30, 2003. Of this amount,
$14.0 million is reported as a current asset and $17.2 million is reported as a
noncurrent asset. The distinction between current and noncurrent is based upon
the expected length of time necessary for the leaching process to remove the
metals from the broken ore. The historical cost of the metal that is expected to
be extracted within twelve months is classified as current and the historical
cost of metals contained within the broken ore that will be extracted beyond
twelve months is classified as noncurrent.

     The estimate of both the ultimate recovery expected over time, and the
quantity of metal that may be extracted relative to such twelve month period,
requires the use of estimates which are inherently inaccurate since


                                       38


they rely upon laboratory testwork. Testwork consists of 60 day leach columns
from which we project metal recoveries up to five years in the future. The
quantities of metal contained in the ore are based upon actual weights and assay
analysis. The rate at which the leach process extracts gold and silver from the
crushed ore is based upon laboratory column tests and actual experience
occurring over approximately fifteen years of leach pad operation at the
Rochester Mine. The assumptions we use to measure metal content during each
stage of the inventory conversion process includes estimated recovery rates
based on laboratory testing and assaying. We periodically review our estimates
compared to actual experience and revise our estimates when appropriate. The
length of time necessary to achieve our currently estimated ultimate recoveries
of 61.5% for silver and 93% for gold is estimated to be between 5 and 10 years.
However, the ultimate recovery will not be known until leaching operations
cease, which is currently estimated for 2011.

     When we began operations in 1986, based solely on laboratory testing, we
estimated the ultimate recovery of silver and gold at 50% and 80%, respectively.
Since 1986, we have adjusted the expected ultimate recovery 3 times (once in
each of 1989, 1997 and 2003) based upon actual experience gained from leach
operations. In 1989, we increased our estimated recoveries for silver and gold
to 55% and 85%, respectively. The change was accounted for prospectively as a
change in estimate, which had the effect of increasing the estimated recoverable
ounces of silver and gold contained in the heap by 1.6 million ounces and 10,000
ounces, respectively. In 1997, we revised our estimated recoveries for silver
and gold to 59% and 89%, respectively, which increased the estimated recoverable
ounces of silver and gold contained in the heap by 4.7 million ounces and 39,000
ounces, respectively. Finally, in 2003, we revised our estimated recoveries for
silver and gold to 61.5% and 93%, respectively, which increased the estimated
recoverable ounces of silver and gold contained in the heap by 1.8 million
ounces and 41,000 ounces, respectively.

     Inventories of ore on leach pads are valued based upon actual costs
incurred to place such ore on the leach pad, less costs allocated to minerals
recovered through the leach process. The costs consist of those production
activities occurring at the mine site and include the costs, including
depreciation, associated with mining, crushing and precipitation circuits. In
addition, refining is provided by a third party refiner to place the metal
extracted from the leach pad in a saleable form. These additional costs are
considered in the valuation of inventory.

Property, Plant and Equipment

     Property, Plant, and Equipment balances are stated at cost, reduced by
provisions to recognize economic impairment in value when management determines
that such impairment has occurred. Mineral property, buildings and improvements,
and machinery and equipment are depreciated using either the straight-line
method or the units-of-production method over the estimated useful lives as of
the in-service date or date of major improvements. We evaluate the realizability
of our long-lived assets, property, plant and equipment, whenever events or
changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of an asset may not
be recoverable. An impairment loss exists when estimated undiscounted cash flows
expected to result from the use of the asset and its eventual disposition are
less than its carrying amount. Any impairment loss recognized represents the
excess of the asset's carrying value as compared to its estimated fair value.

Reclamation and Remediation Costs

     Reclamation and remediation costs are based principally on legal and
regulatory requirements. Management estimates costs associated with reclamation
of mining properties as well as remediation cost for inactive properties. The
estimated undiscounted cash flows generated by our assets and the estimated
liabilities for reclamation and remediation are determined using the Company's
assumptions about future costs, mineral prices, mineral processing recovery
rates, production levels and capital and reclamation costs. Such assumptions are
based on the Company's current mining plan and the best available information
for making such estimates.


                                       39


On an ongoing basis, management evaluates its estimates and assumptions;
however, actual amount could differ from those based on such estimates and
assumptions.

     Effective with the first quarter of 2003 the Company was required by the
FASB to change the methodology used to recognize its reclamation obligations.
Prior to 2003, the Company recognized a pro rata share of the future estimated
reclamation liability on a units-of-production basis. After January 1, 2003
companies are required to recognize the full discounted estimated future
reclamation liability and set up a corresponding asset to be amortized over the
life of the mine on a units-of-production basis. The impact of this change is
accounted for as a change in accounting principle in the first year of
implementation, and the effects of this change are discussed below.

     Upon initial application of FASB No. 143, the Company recognized the
following:

     1.   A liability of $20.7 million for the existing asset retirement
          obligations based on the discounted fair market value of future cash
          flows to settle the obligations,
     2.   An asset of $11.4 million to reflect the retirement cost capitalized
          as an increase to the carrying amount of the associated long-lived
          asset, offset by $7.6 million of accounting depletion through January
          1, 2003, and
     3.   A cumulative effect of change in accounting principle of $2.3 million
          at January 1, 2003.

     The Company measured the cumulative accretion and accumulated depreciation
for the period from the date the liability would have been recognized if FASB
No. 143 were in effect when the Company incurred the liability to the date of
the adoption of the Statement and has reported these as a cumulative effect of a
change in accounting principle. For the initial measurement of these existing
obligations the Company used current information, assumptions, and interest
rates. The initial implementation of FASB No. 143 also required the Company to
reverse all previously recognized retirement obligations (reclamation accruals)
as part of the cumulative effect adjustment.

     The Asset Retirement Obligation is measured using the following factors: 1)
Expected labor costs, 2) Allocated overhead and equipment charges, 3) Contractor
markup, 4) Inflation adjustment, and 5) Market risk premium.

     The sum of all these costs was discounted, using the credit adjusted
risk-free interest rate (current assumption of 7.5%), from the time we expect to
pay the retirement obligation to the time we incur the obligation. The
measurement objective is to determine the amount a third party would demand to
assume the asset retirement obligation.

     Upon initial recognition of a liability for an asset retirement obligation,
the Company capitalized the asset retirement cost with a corresponding debit to
the carrying amount of the related long-lived asset. The Company will deplete
this amount to operating expense using the units-of-production method. The
Company is not required to re-measure the obligation at fair value each period,
but the Company is required to evaluate the cash flow estimates at the end of
each reporting period to determine whether the estimates continue to be
appropriate. Upward revisions in the amount of undiscounted cash flows will be
discounted using the current credit-adjusted risk-free rate. Downward revisions
will be discounted using the credit-adjusted risk-free rate that existed when
the original liability was recorded.


                                       40


     The following is a description of the changes to the Company's asset
retirement obligations from January 1 to June 30, 2003:

     Assets:                                                    2003
                                                           --------------
                                                           (in thousands)
     Asset Retirement Obligation - January 1, 2003           $  20,662
     Accretion                                                     775
     Additions                                                       -
     Settlements                                                  (716)
                                                             ---------
     Asset Retirement Obligation - June 30, 2003             $  20,721

Significant Mining Properties

     The Company's currently operating mines consist of the Rochester Mine, a
heap leach silver and gold mine in northern Nevada of which the Company owns
100%; the Galena Mine, an underground silver mine in Idaho that is 100% owned by
Coeur's wholly-owned subsidiary, Coeur Silver Valley, Inc.; the Cerro Bayo mine,
where Coeur commenced gold and silver production at an open pit and underground
mine in May 2002; and the Martha Mine, which commenced underground and open pit
operations in July, 2002. The Company also owns 100% of the San Bartolome silver
project in Bolivia where it is conducting final feasibility studies and expects
to commence silver production in 2005, and the Kensington property in Alaska
where Coeur is in the initial steps of development of an underground gold mine.

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

     In April 2003, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) issued
Statement of Financial Accounting Standards (SFAS) No. 149, "Amendment of
Statement 133 on Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities." The Statement
amends and clarifies financial accounting and reporting for derivative
instruments, including certain derivative instruments embedded in other
contracts and for hedging activities under FASB Statement No. 133 "Accounting
for Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities." This Statement is effective
for contracts entered into or modified after June 30, 2003 and for hedging
relationships designated after June 30, 2003. The Company plans to adopt SFAS
No. 149 on July 1, 2003 and does not expect a material impact on its financial
condition and results of operations.

     In May 2003, the FASB issued SFAS No. 150, "Accounting for Certain
Financial Instruments with Characteristics of Both Liabilities and Equity." The
Statement improves the accounting for certain financial instruments that, under
previous guidance, issuers could account for as equity. FASB No. 150 requires
that those instruments be classified as liabilities in statements of financial
position. The Statement is effective for financial instruments entered into or
modified after May 31, 2003, otherwise is effective at the beginning of the
first interim period beginning after June 15, 2003. The Company is currently
assessing the impact of SFAS No. 150 on its financial condition and results of
operations.

Item 3.  QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

     The Company is exposed to various market risks as a part of its operations.
As an effort to mitigate losses associated with these risks, the Company may, at
times, enter into derivative financial instruments. These may take the form of
forward sales contracts, foreign currency exchange contracts and interest rate
swaps. The Company does not actively engage in the practice of trading
derivative securities for profit. This discussion of the Company's market risk
assessments contains "forward looking statements" that contain risks and
uncertainties. Actual results and actions could differ materially from those
discussed below.

                                       41


     The Company's operating results are substantially dependent upon the world
market prices of silver and gold. The Company has no control over silver and
gold prices, which can fluctuate widely and are affected by numerous factors,
such as supply and demand and investor sentiment. In order to mitigate some of
the risk associated with these fluctuations, the Company will at times, enter
into forward sale contracts. The Company continually evaluates the potential
benefits of engaging in these strategies based on the then current market
conditions. The Company may be exposed to nonperformance by counterparties as a
result of its hedging activities. This exposure would be limited to the amount
that the spot price of the metal falls short of the contract price.

     The Company operates in several foreign countries, specifically Bolivia,
Argentina and Chile, which exposes it to risks associated with fluctuations in
the exchange rates of the currencies involved. As part of its program to manage
foreign currency risk, the Company will enter into foreign currency forward
exchange contracts. These contracts enable the Company to purchase a fixed
amount of foreign currencies in the future for United States dollars at a
pre-determined exchange rate. Gains and losses on foreign exchange contracts
that are related to firm commitments are designated and effective as hedges and
are deferred and recognized in the same period as the related transaction. All
other contracts that do not qualify as hedges are marked-to-market and the
resulting gains or losses are recorded in income. The Company continually
evaluates the potential benefits of entering into these contracts to mitigate
foreign currency risk and proceeds when it believes that the exchange rates are
most beneficial.

     All of the Company's long-term debt at June 30, 2003 is fixed-rate based.
The Company's exposure to interest rate risk, therefore, is limited to the
amount it could pay at current market rates. The Company currently does not have
any derivative financial instruments to offset the fluctuations in the market
interest rate. It may choose to use instruments, such as interest rate swaps, in
the future to manage the risk associated with interest rate changes.



                                                                                         Fair
                                                                                         Value
(dollars in thousands)        2003      2004      2005     2006       2007     Total    6/30/03
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                                                                   
Liabilities
   Long Term Debt
   Fixed Rate               $ 9,887   $ 5,873   $ 9,939   $     -   $37,185   $62,884   $63,228
   Average Interest Rate     9.166%    8.607%    8.681%    9.000%    9.000%

Derivative Financial
 Instruments
   Gold Forward
   Sales - USD                                                                              $276
     Ounces                  26,000    14,000         -         -         -    40,000
     Price Per Ounce           $331      $353         -         -         -

Foreign Currency
 Contracts                                                                                  $45
   Chilean Peso - USD       $ 2,035         -         -         -         -   $ 2,035
   Exchange Rate                708         -         -         -         -
    (CLP to USD)


     Fair value is determined by trading information on or near the balance
sheet date. Long term debt represents the face amount of the outstanding
convertible debentures and timing of when these become due. Interest rates
presented in the table are calculated using the weighted average of the
outstanding face amount of each debenture for the period remaining in each
period presented. All long term debt is denominated in US dollars.

                                       42


Item 4.  CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

     The Company's Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer have
concluded that the Company's disclosure controls and procedures are effective
based on their evaluation of such controls and procedures as of June 30, 2003.
There were no changes in the Company's internal control over financial reporting
during the second quarter of 2003 that has materially affected, or is
responsibly likely to materially affect the Company's internal controls over
financial reporting.

PART II. OTHER INFORMATION

Item 2.   CHANGES IN SECURITIES AND USE OF PROCEEDS.

     (c)  Sale of Unregistered Securities

     On February 26, 2003, the Company privately sold $37.2 million principal
amount of 9% Convertible Senior Subordinated Notes due February 2007 (the "9%
Notes"). The offering was not underwritten. The 9% Notes were sold to a total of
12 institutional investors. The Company received net proceeds of approximately
$33.8 million. Additional information regarding the 9% Notes and the private
placement are set forth above under "Management's Discussion and Analysis of
Financial Condition and Results of Operations - Liquidity and Capital Resources
- Issuance of 9% Convertible Senior Subordinated Notes" included under Item 2 of
Part I of this report. The 9% Notes were issued pursuant to an Indenture, dated
as of February 26, 2003, between the Company and the Bank of New York, as
trustee. Each of the institutional investors qualified as an "accredited
investor" within the meaning of Rule 501(a) under the Act. Of the financial
advisory fees paid by the Company in connection with the issuance of the 9%
Notes, the Company elected to issue 0.6 million unregistered shares of common
stock valued at $1.54 per share in lieu of cash. The private issuance of 9%
Notes and common stock was exempt from registration under the Act in reliance
upon Section 4(2) thereof.

     Pursuant to the terms of the Purchase Agreements, dated as of February 20,
2003, between the Company and the institutional investors and the related
Registration Rights Agreements, dated as of February 26, 2003, between the
Company and such institutional investors, as well as the Registration Rights
Agreement, dated as of March 20, 2003, between the Company and the financial
advisor, the Company filed Amendment No. 2 to its Registration Statement on Form
S-3 on March 21, 2003, in order to register the 9% Notes that had been issued in
the private placement (as well as the shares of common stock issuable upon
conversion thereof and as interest thereon) and the shares of common stock
issued in lieu of cash financial advisory fees for resale in the future by the
holders thereof under the Act. This Registration Statement became effective on
May 2, 2003.

Item 4.  SUBMISSION OF MATTERS TO A VOTE OF SECURITY HOLDERS

     The Company's Annual Meeting of Shareholders was held on May 20, 2003. Of
the Company's total 140,121,504 shares of common stock outstanding on April 7,
2003 (the record date), 107,480,297 shares (or 76.7% of the outstanding) were
represented in person or by proxy at the Annual Meeting.

The first proposal was the election of directors. The following persons were
nominated and elected to serve as members of the Board of Directors for one year
or until their successors are elected and qualified by the votes indicated:
Cecil D Andrus - 104,599,393 for and 2,880,904 withheld; James J. Curran -
105,772,749 for and 1,707,548 withheld; James A. McClure - 105,709,973 for and
1,770,324 withheld; Robert E. Mellor - 105,630,713 for and 1,849,584 withheld;
John H. Robinson - 105,698,384 for and 1,781,913 withheld; Timothy R. Winterer
-105,751,088 for and 1,729,209 withheld; J. Kenneth Thompson - 105,777,138 for
and 1,703,159 withheld; and Dennis E. Wheeler - 104,625,139 for and 2,855,158
withheld.

     The second proposal was the proposed adoption of a new Long-Term Incentive
Plan to replace an existing plan and the reservation of 6,800,000 shares of
common stock under the terms of the plan commencing in 2004. The proposal was
approved by the holders of more than the required majority of the shares of
common stock voting at the meeting. The proposal was approved by a vote of
100,017,600 shares for (representing 71.4% of the shares voting), 6,452,044
shares against with 1,010,653 shares abstaining.


                                       43


Item 6.  EXHIBITS AND REPORTS ON FORM 8-K

     a)  Exhibits

         EXHIBIT NO.                        DESCRIPTION
         -----------                        -----------

             4.1        First Supplemental Indenture, dated as of July 15, 2003,
                        by and between the Company and The Bank of New York, as
                        trustee, relating to the Company's 9% Convertible Senior
                        Subordinated Notes due February 26, 2007. (Incorporated
                        herein by reference to Exhibit No. 4.1 to the Company's
                        Current Report on Form 8-K dated July 10, 2003 and filed
                        on July 16, 2003).

            10.1        Common Stock Purchase Agreement, dated as of May 23,
                        2003, by and between the Company and the person
                        signatory thereto. (Incorporated herein by reference to
                        Exhibit No. 10.1 to the Company's Current Report on Form
                        8-K dated and filed May 23, 2003).

            10.2        Form of Early Conversion Agreement, dated as of July 10,
                        2003, by and among the Company and each of the persons
                        signatory and listed on Annex A thereto. (Incorporated
                        herein by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to the Company's
                        Current Report on Form 8-K dated July 10, 2003 and filed
                        on July 16, 2003).

            10.3        Employment Agreement, dated as of June 9, 2003, between
                        the Company and James R. Arnold (filed herewith).

            99.1        Certification by Chief Executive Officer pursuant to
                        Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. (This
                        certification, required as Exhibit 31 under Item 601(a)
                        of Regulation S-K, is filed as Exhibit 99.1 pursuant to
                        SEC interim filing guidance.)

            99.2        Certification by the Chief Financial Officer pursuant to
                        Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. (This
                        certification, required as Exhibit 31 under Item 601(a)
                        of Regulation S-K, is filed as Exhibit 99.2 pursuant to
                        SEC interim filing guidance.)

            99.3        Certification of Periodic Financial Report by the Chief
                        Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer pursuant
                        to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. (This
                        certification, required as Exhibit 32 under Item 601(a)
                        of Regulation S-K, is furnished in accordance with Item
                        601(b)(32)(ii) of Regulation S-K as Exhibit 99.3
                        pursuant to SEC interim filing guidance.)

     (b)  Reports on Form 8-K.

          During the quarter ended June 30, 2003, the Company filed Current
          Reports on Form 8-K dated May 14, 2003 (furnishing the Company's press
          release announcing quarterly results of operations - filed May 15,
          2003 under Item 12); May 23, 2003 (reporting an event under Item 5 -
          filed May 23, 2003); and June 20, 2003 (reporting an event under Item
          5 - filed June 23, 2003). Subsequent to the end of the quarter, the
          Company filed a Current Report on Form 8-K dated July 10, 2003
          (reporting an event under Item 5 - filed on July 16, 2003).


                                       44


                                   SIGNATURES

     Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the
Registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the
undersigned thereunto duly authorized.



                                                COEUR D'ALENE MINES CORPORATION
                                                (Registrant)



Dated July 24, 2003                             /s/ Dennis E. Wheeler
                                                -------------------------------
                                                DENNIS E. WHEELER
                                                Chairman and
                                                  Chief Executive Officer



Dated July 24, 2003                             /s/ James A.Sabala
                                                -------------------------------
                                                JAMES A. SABALA
                                                Executive Vice President and
                                                  Chief Financial Officer



                                       45