UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

FORM 10-K

x

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended: December 31, 2005

Or

o

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from               to               

Commission file number: 0-13063

SCIENTIFIC GAMES CORPORATION

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

Delaware

81-0422894

(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)

(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)

 

750 Lexington Avenue, 25th Floor

New York, New York 10022

(Address of principal executive offices)

Registrant’s telephone number: (212) 754-2233

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act: None

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:

Title of each class

Name of each exchange on which registered

Class A Common Stock, $.01 par value

Nasdaq National Market

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.  Yes x  No

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 and Section 15(d) of the Act.  Yeso  No x

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.  Yes x  No o

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of the registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.  o

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, or a non-accelerated filer. See definition of “accelerated filer and large accelerated filer” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.. (Check one):

Large accelerated filer x

Accelerated filer o

Non-accelerated filer o

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act).  Yes o  No x

As of June 30, 2005 the market value of voting and non-voting common equity held by non-affiliates of the registrant was approximately $1,726,074,930.(1)

Common shares outstanding as of March 15, 2006 were 90,668,961

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

The following document is incorporated herein by reference:

Document

 

Parts Into Which Incorporated

 

Proxy Statement for the Company’s
2006 Annual Meeting of Stockholders

Part III


(1)           For this purpose only, “non-affiliates” excludes directors and executive officers.

EXHIBIT INDEX APPEARS ON PAGE 135

 




PART I
FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

Certain statements contained in this Form 10-K constitute “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the United States Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. In some cases, forward-looking statements can be identified by the use of forward-looking terminology such as “may,” “estimate,” “intend,” “continue,” “believe,” “expect” or “anticipate” or the negatives thereof, variations thereon or similar terminology. The forward-looking statements contained in this Form 10-K are generally located in the material set forth under the headings “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and “Business,” but may be found in other locations as well. These forward-looking statements generally relate to plans and objectives for future operations and are based upon management’s reasonable estimates of future results or trends. Although we believe that the plans and objectives reflected in or suggested by such forward-looking statements are reasonable, such plans or objectives may not be achieved. Actual results may differ from projected results due, but not limited, to unforeseen developments, including developments relating to the following:

·       the availability and adequacy of our cash flow to satisfy our obligations, including our debt service obligations and our need for additional funds required to support capital improvements, development and acquisitions;

·       economic, competitive, demographic, business and other conditions in our local and regional markets;

·       changes or developments in the laws, regulations or taxes in the gaming and lottery industries;

·       actions taken or omitted to be taken by third parties, including customers, suppliers, competitors, members and shareholders, as well as legislative, regulatory, judicial and other governmental authorities;

·       changes in business strategy, capital improvements, development plans, including those due to environmental remediation concerns, or changes in personnel or their compensation, including federal, state and local minimum wage requirements;

·       an inability to renew or early termination of our contracts;

·       an inability to complete the EssNet AB or Global Draw LTD acquisitions or to engage in future acquisitions;

·       the loss of any license or permit, including the failure to obtain an unconditional renewal of a required gaming license on a timely basis; and

·       resolution of any pending or future litigation in a manner adverse to us.

You should read this Form 10-K completely and with the understanding that actual future results may be materially different from what we expect. All subsequent written and oral forward-looking statements attributable to us or to persons acting on our behalf are expressly qualified in their entirety by the foregoing factors. These forward-looking statements speak only as of the date of the document in which they are made. We disclaim any obligation or undertaking to provide any updates or revisions to any forward-looking statement to reflect any change in our expectations or any change in events, conditions or circumstances in which the forward-looking statement is based.

As you read this Form 10-K, you should also note the following: This Form 10-K contains various references to industry market data and certain industry forecasts. The industry market data and industry forecasts were obtained from publicly available information and industry publications. Industry publications generally state that the information contained therein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable, but that the accuracy and completeness of that information is not guaranteed.

2




Similarly, industry forecasts, while we believe them to be accurate, have not been independently verified by us and we do not make any representation as to the accuracy of that information.

ITEM 1.                BUSINESS

Unless the context indicates otherwise, all references to the words “Scientific Games,” “we,” “our,” “ours,” “us” and the “Company” refer to Scientific Games Corporation and its consolidated subsidiaries. “International” refers to non-United States jurisdictions. “Online” lottery refers to a computerized system in which lottery terminals in retail outlets are continuously connected to a central computer system for the sale and validation of lottery tickets and related functions. “OTB” refers to off-track betting facilities, including those owned and operated by our subsidiaries Autotote Enterprises, Inc. (in Connecticut) and Autotote Nederland B.V. (in the Netherlands). “Handle” is an industry term for dollars wagered.

Overview

Scientific Games Corporation was incorporated in the state of Delaware on July 2, 1984. We are a leading worldwide provider of services, systems and products to both the lottery and pari-mutuel wagering industries based on revenues. We believe we offer our customers the widest array of some of the most technologically advanced products and services in each of these industries. We also believe that we are the world’s only fully integrated lottery service provider, offering lottery authorities online lottery systems, instant tickets and related facilities management, or cooperative services, programs, which effectively enable such authorities to outsource all of their instant ticket lottery operations to us. We report our operations in four business segments: Lottery Group, Pari-mutuel Group, Venue Management Group and Telecommunications Products Group.

Lottery Group (75% of 2005 revenue)

We are a global marketing and technology leader in the lottery industry with over 120 national and international customers, including many of the world’s highest revenue-producing lotteries. We offer online, instant and video lottery products, integrated systems and services including instant tickets, licensed brand games, entertainment-based promotions, online and instant ticket validation systems and terminals, cooperative services and innovative ticket vending systems.

Our instant ticket and related services business is the industry leader in the United States. Our instant ticket customers include 31 of the 42 U.S. jurisdictions (including the District of Columbia) that currently sell instant lottery tickets, and we have sold instant tickets and related services to lotteries in over 50 other countries. Instant ticket and related services includes ticket design and manufacturing, as well as value-added services including game design, sales and marketing support, inventory management and warehousing and fulfillment services. In 2004, we expanded our cooperative services program to include the provision of such services to Consorzio Lotterie Nazionali, in Italy, which began operations in 2004. In 2005, we increased our international presence following our December 2004 acquisition of Printpool Honsel GmbH (“Honsel”) by expanding our operations in Germany with the addition of new contracts for Toto-Lotto Niedersachsen GmbH and Lotterie-Treuhandgesellschaft mbH. We also provide lotteries with over 100 different game brands, including NASCAR®, Mandalay Bay®, National Basketball Association®, Harley-Davidson®, Wheel-of-Fortune®, Hasbro®, Corvette®, World Poker Tour ® and The World Series of Poker®. We believe that our innovative products will allow lotteries to increase retail sales of instant tickets. Our instant ticket contracts typically have an initial term of three years and frequently include multiple renewal options, which our customers have generally exercised for additional periods ranging from one to five years. We typically sell our instant tickets for a per unit price or are paid a fee equal to a percentage of the retail value of the instant tickets sold. Instant tickets and related services accounted for approximately 48% of the revenue of our Lottery Group for the 2005 fiscal year.

3




Our lottery systems business primarily includes the supply of transaction processing software for the accounting and validation of both instant and online lottery games, point-of-sale terminal hardware sales, central site computers and communication hardware sales, and ongoing support and maintenance for these products. In the United States, we typically provide the necessary equipment, software and maintenance services pursuant to long-term contracts that typically have a minimum initial term of five years, under which we are generally paid a fee equal to a percentage of all dollars wagered on lottery tickets. Our U.S. systems contracts typically contain multiple renewal options that generally have been exercised by our customers. Internationally, we typically sell terminals and systems to lottery authorities and provide ongoing fee-based support under long-term contracts. We have contracts to operate online lottery systems for 17 of the 44 U.S. jurisdictions (including the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico) that operate online lotteries and we believe we are the second largest online lottery provider in Europe.

Pari-mutuel Group (10% of 2005 revenue)

We are a leading worldwide provider of computerized wagering systems to the pari-mutuel wagering industry. We provide our systems and services to horse and greyhound racetracks, OTBs, casinos, jai alai frontons, telephone and internet account wagering operators and other establishments where pari-mutuel wagering is permitted. In addition, we are a leading provider of ancillary services to the industry, such as race simulcasting and telecommunications services and telephone and internet account wagering.

We believe our systems processed 50% of the estimated $19 billion in pari-mutuel wagering conducted on racing in North America in 2005. In our North American pari-mutuel business, we enter into service contracts, typically with an initial term of five years, pursuant to which we are paid a percentage of all wagers processed by our wagering systems, and we receive additional fees for our ancillary services, on either a per event or a monthly subscription basis. In most international markets, we sell our pari-mutuel wagering systems and terminals to pari-mutuel operators.

Venue Management Group (8% of 2005 revenue)

We have the right to operate in perpetuity substantially all off-track pari-mutuel wagering in Connecticut (with the exception of OTB operations at two greyhound racetracks and the Mohegan Sun and Foxwoods casinos), subject to our compliance with certain licensing requirements. Our Connecticut operations consist of 11 OTB facilities, including video simulcasting at six locations, and telephone account wagering for customers in 25 states. Our weighted average commission, based on dollars wagered, for our Connecticut OTB operations is approximately 21%. We have recently expanded our off-track pari-mutuel wagering group outside of Connecticut by acquiring a simulcast OTB facility located in Waterville, Maine. We also provide facilities management services to five licensed wagering operators.

We have the right to operate all on-track and off-track pari-mutuel wagering in the Netherlands under a license granted by the Dutch Ministry of Agriculture which extends through June 2008. We currently conduct operations in 28 OTB locations and four racetracks throughout the Netherlands. Our weighted average commission, based on dollars wagered, for our Dutch operations is approximately 30%.

Telecommunications Products Group (7% of 2005 revenue)

We are a worldwide leading manufacturer of prepaid phone cards, which entitle cellular phone users to a defined value of airtime. Prepaid phone cards offer consumers in more than 50 countries worldwide a cost-effective way to purchase cellular airtime, without requiring wireless service providers to extend credit or consumers to commit to contracts.

Prepaid phone cards utilize the secure process employed by us in the production of instant lottery tickets which helps ensure the integrity and reliability of the product. We believe we are the largest

4




supplier of paper-based prepaid phone cards in the world. Our office locations now include United Kingdom, Malaysia, Hong Kong, India, Ivory Coast, Turkey, Egypt and the Ukraine.

Recent Developments

On January 23, 2006 we announced that we had signed a non-binding letter of intent to purchase The Global Draw LTD (“Global Draw”) and certain related companies. In the United Kingdom, Global Draw is a leading supplier of fixed odds betting terminals and systems, and interactive sports betting systems. Global Draw is beginning to extend its central determination, fixed odds system to meet the needs of European video lottery markets. The nonbinding letter of intent specifies an upfront purchase price of approximately $183 million, plus an earn-out which will be paid to the selling shareholder and existing management team depending on the future financial performance of the business. The acquisition is expected to close within the first six months of 2006. We expect to finance the acquisition through a combination of borrowings under our existing revolving credit facility and new debt. The potential transaction is subject to the execution of a binding definitive agreement, and other conditions.

On January 20, 2006, we signed an agreement to acquire substantially all of the online lottery assets and all technology and intellectual property pertaining to the online lottery business of the Swedish firm EssNet AB (“EssNet”) for $60 million. EssNet specializes in online lottery systems and terminals to run numbers games, sports betting, instant tickets and mobile games on a national level. EssNet’s lottery customers include seven states in Germany, the national lotteries of Hungary and Norway, Golden Casket and Tattersall’s Lottery in Australia, and other national lotteries. The sale is subject to certain closing conditions including regulatory and customer approvals, purchase price adjustments, and other specified conditions. We will finance the purchase under our existing $250 million revolving credit facility.

Industry Overview

Lottery Market

Lotteries are operated by domestic and foreign governmental authorities and their licensees in approximately 200 jurisdictions throughout the world. Currently, 44 U.S. jurisdictions (including the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico) sell instant and/or online lottery tickets. Governments typically authorize lotteries as a means of generating revenues without the imposition of additional taxes. Net lottery proceeds are frequently set aside for particular public purposes, such as education, aid to the elderly, conservation, transportation and economic development. As proceeds derived from lottery ticket sales have become a significant source of funding for such programs, many jurisdictions have come to rely on such proceeds to support some of those public purposes.

Although there are many types of lottery games worldwide, governmentally authorized lotteries may generally be categorized into three principal groups: instant ticket, online and traditional draw-type lotteries. An instant ticket lottery is typically played by removing a coating from a preprinted ticket to determine whether it is a winner. Online lotteries, such as Powerball®, are based on a random selection of a series of numbers. Online lottery prizes are generally based on the number of winners who share the prize pool, although fixed prizes are also offered. Online lotteries are conducted through a computerized system in which lottery terminals in retail outlets are continuously connected to a central computer system. Online lottery systems may also be used to validate instant tickets to confirm large prize levels and prevent duplicate payments, or separate instant ticket validation systems may be installed. Internationally, the older form of traditional draw-type lottery games, in which players purchase tickets which are manually processed for a future drawing for prizes of a fixed amount, is a popular form of play. In addition, lotteries may offer keno, video lottery, sports and other lottery games. Quick draw keno is typically played every five minutes in restricted social settings such as bars and is usually offered as an extension of online lottery systems. There are video lotteries played on video lottery terminals (“VLTs”), featuring “line-up” and card

5




games, typically targeted to locations such as horse and greyhound racetracks, bars, nightclubs and similar establishments. Video lotteries generally use a system different from an online system for accounting, security and control purposes. In addition, in Oregon, several provinces in Canada and several countries outside the U.S., lotteries offer pari-mutuel or fixed odds wagers on various sports.

Based on industry information, through December 31, 2005, U.S. online lottery retail sales totaled approximately $21.3 billion, and 2005 U.S. instant ticket lottery sales totaled approximately $27.6 billion. The U.S. instant ticket market grew at a compound annual growth rate of 8% from 1995 to 2005. Based on industry information, we estimate that 2005 international online lottery retail sales totaled approximately $99.3 billion and that 2005 international instant ticket lottery sales totaled approximately $37.8 billion. Industry data indicates that in the U.S. instant ticket retail sales have been growing faster than online games because of “instant” rewards rather than the delayed rewards of online games with periodic or weekly drawings.

U.S. Instant Ticket and Online Lottery Sales

GRAPHIC

Source: LaFleur’s World Lottery Almanac

Pari-mutuel Market

In pari-mutuel wagering, individuals bet against each other on horse races, greyhound races, jai alai matches and other events. Pari-mutuel wagering patrons place specific types of wagers (e.g., on a specified horse to win) and a patron’s winnings are determined by dividing the total Handle wagered, less a set commission, among the winners. Wagering is generally conducted at horse and greyhound racetracks, jai alai frontons, OTBs and casino racebooks or through licensed telephone and internet account wagering operators. Licenses to conduct races and/or offer pari-mutuel wagering are granted by governments to private enterprises, non-profit racing associations and occasionally government organizations, including lotteries.

Pari-mutuel wagering is currently authorized in 43 states in the U.S., Puerto Rico, all provinces in Canada and approximately 65 other countries around the world. Based on industry information, we estimate that the North American market for all forms of pari-mutuel wagering was approximately $19 billion in 2005, down from approximately $20 billion in 2000. We believe the decline in North American pari-mutuel Handle during this period is primarily due to competition from other gaming activities such as casinos, lotteries and on-line gambling and competition from other forms of individual and family entertainment such as movies, restaurants and the internet.

Remote wagering, in which customers bet on races held at another location, has caused substantial changes in the distribution channels for pari-mutuel wagering and consolidation of live racing. Wagering within the pari-mutuel industry has evolved from wagering only at a racetrack where the race is held, to

6




wagering at a racetrack on races simulcast from other racetracks, to wagering at an OTB or other off-track venue, and now, in some jurisdictions, to wagering via the telephone and the internet.

In addition to favorable changes in the applicable statutes and regulations, a number of technological advances have facilitated remote wagering, including the simulcasting of live races via private satellite video networks, public broadcasting and internet video streaming. Remote wagering has also increased Handle by enabling wagering on most racing events, facilitating virtually around the clock wagering, year-round. Increases in remote Handle have helped to offset the decline in live Handle (i.e., Handle at the race or event itself). Remote wagering increased its share of the total U.S. thoroughbred pari-mutuel racing industry Handle from 15% in 1986 to 88% in 2005.

Prepaid Phone Cards Market

Prepaid phone cards offer consumers convenient cellular airtime purchases and help to increase the market for cellular services. We believe that the further growth of cellular phone penetration, especially in less economically developed countries, will expand the prepaid phone card business. It is estimated that approximately 50% of all European cellular phone subscribers use prepaid calling services. While less common in the U.S., prepaid phone cards offer consumers worldwide a cost-effective way to purchase cellular airtime, without requiring phone companies to extend credit or consumers to commit to contracts. Because card access number theft is common, the security of the card is critical; our phone cards incorporate proprietary security technology originally developed for our instant lottery ticket operations.

Operational Overview

Lottery Group

Our Lottery Group provides instant lottery tickets and related services and lottery systems.

Instant Ticket and Related Services.   In 1974, we introduced the first secure instant game ticket. Today, we remain a leading designer, manufacturer and distributor of instant tickets worldwide. We market instant tickets and related services to domestic and foreign lottery jurisdictions and commercial customers. We presently have contracts with 31 of the 42 U.S. jurisdictions, including the District of Columbia, that currently sell instant lottery tickets. Our instant ticket contracts typically have an initial term of three years and frequently include multiple renewal options which our customers generally exercise for additional periods ranging from one to five years. We typically sell our instant tickets for a per unit price or are paid a fee equal to a percentage of the retail value of the instant tickets sold. In addition, we have sold instant lottery tickets to customers in over 50 countries internationally. In 2004 and 2005, we sold approximately 15.9 billion and 18.4 billion, respectively, 2 x 4 inch equivalent instant tickets, of which approximately 18% and 21%, respectively, were sold outside the U.S. Some international customers purchase instant tickets as needed rather than through multi-game supply contracts.

The instant tickets we manufacture are typically printed on recyclable ticket stock by a series of computer-controlled presses and ink-jet imagers, which we believe incorporate the most advanced technology and security currently available in the industry. Instant tickets generally range in size from 2 inches by 3 inches to ticket sizes as large as some calendars; instant tickets are normally played by removing a coating to determine if they are winning tickets.

The increased application of computer-based and communications technologies to the manufacturing and servicing of instant tickets continues to separate the printing of instant tickets from conventional forms of printing. We are generally recognized within the lottery industry as the leader in applying these technologies to the manufacturing and sale of instant tickets. In order to maintain our position as a leading innovator within the lottery industry, we intend to continue to explore and develop new technologies and their applications to instant lottery tickets and systems. We also manufacture instant tickets for

7




promotional games and sell pull-tab tickets to our lottery customers through a marketing agreement with International Gamco, Inc., a manufacturer of pull-tab lottery tickets.

We offer licensed properties and products to generate interest in lottery games as a means of increasing sales. Our product offerings include themed instant games such as Betty Boop™, The Pink Panther™, I Love Lucy®, Harley-Davidson®, Hasbro® and Wheel of Fortune® to name a few.  Also, associated with licensed properties is the service of supplying lotteries with branded merchandise prizes, advertising, promotional support, turn-key drawing management and prize fulfillment programs. Popular brands offered as non-cash prizes for lottery players are Corvette®, Ford Mustang and F-150 Trucks. Our licensed properties encompass classic brands such as, Jeopardy!®, Popeye™ and Dick Tracy™ as well as capitalizing on the latest opportunities such as, World Poker Tour®, World Series of Poker® and The Apprentice™. Lastly, our licensed properties include popular professional sports such as National Basketball Association® and NASCAR®.

We pioneered the idea of privatizing lottery functions, through our cooperative services program, whereby we manage a lottery authority’s instant ticket operations, as a means of reducing the operating costs of lottery authorities while increasing lottery revenues. Cooperative services contracts bundle instant tickets, systems, facilities management and/or other services, including the design and installation of game management software, telemarketing, field sales, accounting, instant ticket game design, inventory and distribution, sales staff training, managing staff and advising with respect to security, maintenance, communication network and sales agent hot-line service for lottery jurisdictions. While the majority of lottery jurisdictions to date have chosen to manage the distribution and sales of tickets themselves, we have been successful in demonstrating to a number of jurisdictions that we can perform these functions more effectively. We expect that more state or foreign governments will decide to privatize or outsource various lottery operations. We have significant experience in these services and are well-positioned to offer this privatization or outsourcing option to lottery authorities.

We have contracts for cooperative services with the U.S. jurisdictions of Arizona, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Ohio, Maine, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Carolina and Tennessee. Under such contracts, we are typically paid a percentage of the lottery authority’s total instant ticket revenues. Customers designate the services they want us to perform from a menu of cooperative services offered.

Through the acquisition of Honsel in December 2004, we have been able to expand our cooperative service style service offering to Europe. In 2005 we were awarded two contracts with Toto-Lotto Niedersachsen GmbH and one contract with Lotterie-Treuhandgesellschaft mbH Hessen, the state lottery of Hessen, Germany, to supply instant lottery tickets and the other lottery services.

We also applied our cooperative service programs in Italy as a member of  Consorzio Lotterie Nazionali, a consortium consisting principally of ourselves, Lottomatica S.p.A, and Arianna 2001, a company owned by the Federation of Italian Tobacconists. The consortium has a signed contract with the Italian Monopoli di Stato to be the exclusive operator of the Italian Gratta e Vinci instant lottery. The contract has an initial term of six years with a six year-extension option. Under our contract with the consortium, we will be the exclusive supplier of instant lottery tickets, will participate in the profits or losses of the consortium as a 20% equity owner, and will assist Lottomatica S.p.A in the lottery operations. The consortium’s contract commenced in mid-2004 and sales have continued to improve from approximately 4 million tickets per week at the start to approximately 60 million per week currently, an overall improvement of 1,400%.

Lottery Systems.   We are a leading provider of sophisticated, customized computer software, equipment and data communication services to government-sponsored and privately-operated lotteries in the U.S. and internationally. This business includes the sale of online systems, instant ticket validation systems and terminals. Central computer systems, terminals and associated software are typically provided

8




in the U.S. through facilities management contracts and internationally through outright sales, often from different vendors. We have contracts to operate online lottery systems for 17 of the 44 U.S. jurisdictions (including the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico) that operate online lotteries and we believe we are the second largest online lottery provider in Europe.

Our lottery systems utilize proprietary technology that facilitates high speed processing of online wagers as well as validation of winning online and instant play tickets. Our lottery business includes the supply of transaction-processing software that accommodates instant ticket accounting and validation and online lottery games, point-of-sale terminal hardware which connects to these systems, central site computers and communication hardware which run these systems, and on-going operation support and maintenance services. We also provide software, hardware and support for sports betting systems, video lottery systems and operation of credit card processing systems for non-lottery customers.

Internationally, we have lottery systems operating in Australia, Austria, Canada, China, Dominican Republic, France, Germany, Iceland, Italy, the Netherlands, Peru, Philippines, Puerto Rico, South Korea, and Switzerland.

9




We also sell our lottery terminals separately from our sale of complete lottery systems. Our terminal product offerings include the EXTREMA® online lottery terminals, SciScan Technology® terminals, STAN™ self-serve terminals and Play Central™ terminals. Our EXTREMA® online terminals utilize a standard PC architecture, graphical interface touch screens for teller input without a keyboard and high speed thermal printers.

United States Lottery Contracts

The table below lists the U.S. lottery contracts for which we had executed agreements as of March 1, 2006 and certain information with respect thereto. We are the exclusive provider of systems in all contracts and the primary supplier of instant tickets unless otherwise noted. The commencement date of the current contract is the date we began generating revenues under such contract, which for our online contracts is typically the start-up date. The table also includes instant ticket or online retail sales, as applicable, for each state or district.

State/District

 

 

 

Fiscal 2005*
State
Instant
Ticket or Online
Retail Sales
(in millions)

 

Type of Contract**

 

Commencement
Date of
Current Contract

 

Expiration Date of
Current Contract
(before exercise
of remaining
renewal options)

 

Current
Renewal
Options
Remaining

 

Arizona

 

 

$

219.7

 

 

ITRS

 

January 2003

 

January 2008

 

2 one-year

 

California

 

 

1,719.6

 

 

ITRS

 

July 2005

 

June 2009

 

4 one-year

 

Colorado

 

 

282.7

 

 

ITRS

 

December 2005

 

November. 2007

 

3 one-year

 

Colorado

 

 

134.3

 

 

Online

 

April 2005

 

October 2012

 

1 two-year

 

Connecticut

 

 

592.3

 

 

ITRS

 

August 2002

 

August 2006

 

1 one-year

 

Connecticut

 

 

340.6

 

 

Online

 

May 1998

 

May 2008

 

None

 

Delaware

 

 

28.7

 

 

ITRS

 

November 2005

 

November 2008

 

3 one-year

 

Delaware

 

 

85.4

 

 

Online & Video

 

September 2001

 

February 2010

 

5 one-year

 

District of Columbia

 

 

36.4

 

 

ITRS

 

August 2005

 

August 2010

 

2 one-year

 

Florida

 

 

1,911.7

 

 

ITRS

 

April 1997

 

September 2008

 

None

 

Georgia

 

 

1,841.1

 

 

ITRS

 

September 2003

 

September 2010

 

None

 

Illinois

 

 

907.1

 

 

ITRS

 

December 2005

 

December  2008

 

2 one-year

 

Indiana (2)

 

 

490.2

 

 

ITRS

 

January 2002

 

January 2009

 

None

 

Indiana

 

 

250.0

 

 

Online

 

January 1999

 

August 2009

 

None

 

Iowa

 

 

78.6

 

 

Online

 

July 2001

 

June 2010

 

1 one-year

 

Iowa (2)

 

 

126.6

 

 

ITRS

 

January 2005

 

December 2006

 

3 one-year

 

Kentucky (2)

 

 

409.3

 

 

ITRS

 

September 2002

 

September 2009

 

None

 

Louisiana

 

 

104.1

 

 

ITRS

 

February 2005

 

October 2007

 

3 one-year

 

Maine

 

 

57.4

 

 

Online

 

July 2001

 

June 2011

 

None

 

Maine

 

 

151.9

 

 

ITRS

 

July 2001

 

June 2011

 

None

 

Maine

 

 

N/A

 

 

Video

 

February 2005

 

February 2010

 

1 five-year

 

Maryland (4)

 

 

1,101.4

 

 

Online

 

December 2005

 

July 2011

 

1 five-year

 

Massachusetts (2)

 

 

3,142.3

 

 

ITRS

 

August 2004

 

August 2006

 

3 one-year

 

Minnesota (1)

 

 

253.4

 

 

ITRS

 

March 2005

 

February 2007

 

3 one-year

 

Missouri (2)

 

 

488.4

 

 

ITRS

 

April 2001

 

June 2007

 

None

 

Montana

 

 

22.8

 

 

Online

 

March 1999

 

March 2006

 

None

 

New Hampshire

 

 

66.6

 

 

Online

 

July 2000

 

June 2010

 

None

 

New Jersey (1)

 

 

1,066.1

 

 

ITRS

 

November 2001

 

October 2006

 

2 one-year

 

New Mexico

 

 

90.8

 

 

ITRS

 

March 2003

 

March 2007

 

3 one-year

 

New Mexico

 

 

NA

 

 

Video

 

December 2005

 

December 2013

 

None

 

New York (1)

 

 

3,025.0

 

 

ITRS

 

November 2001

 

November 2006

 

None

 

North Dakota

 

 

15.2

 

 

Online

 

March 2004

 

March 2012

 

2 one-year

 

10




 

Ohio

 

 

1,216.3

 

 

ITRS

 

July 2001

 

June 2007

 

None

 

Oklahoma (3).

 

 

N/A

 

 

ITRS

 

August 2005

 

August 2006

 

6 one-year

 

Oklahoma (3)

 

 

N/A

 

 

Online

 

August 2005

 

August 2006

 

6 one-year

 

Oregon (1) (2)

 

 

135.4

 

 

ITRS

 

May 2005

 

May 2008

 

3 one-year

 

Pennsylvania

 

 

1,317.0

 

 

ITRS

 

April 1997

 

April 2007

 

None

 

Pennsylvania

 

 

1,314.3

 

 

Online

 

February 1998

 

December 2008

 

None

 

South Carolina

 

 

578.8

 

 

ITRS

 

October 2001

 

October 2006

 

None

 

South Carolina

 

 

378.2

 

 

Online

 

January 2002

 

December 2008

 

None

 

South Dakota

 

 

16.5

 

 

ITRS

 

August 2005

 

August 2007

 

3 one-year

 

South Dakota

 

 

16.4

 

 

Online & Video

 

March 1999

 

August 2009

 

None

 

Tennessee

 

 

599.0

 

 

ITRS

 

January 2004

 

April 2011

 

None

 

Texas

 

 

2,268.5

 

 

ITRS

 

September 2004

 

August 2007

 

5 one-year

 

Vermont

 

 

21.4

 

 

Online

 

July 2000

 

June 2010

 

None

 

Vermont (5)

 

 

71.4

 

 

ITRS

 

February 2006

 

January 2008

 

2 one-year

 

Washington

 

 

294.7

 

 

ITRS

 

March 2000

 

March 2006

 

None

 

West Virginia

 

 

111.9

 

 

ITRS

 

February 2006

 

January 2009

 

2 one-year

 

West Virginia

 

 

140.9

 

 

Online

 

November 1999

 

July 2007

 

None

 

Wisconsin (2)

 

 

269.9

 

 

ITRS

 

July 2004

 

June 2006

 

3 one-year

 


(1)          Secondary instant ticket supplier in 2005. Recently awarded the primary contract in New York, expected to start May 2006, with an initial term of three years and two potential one-year extensions.

(2)          Pull-tab sales are included within instant ticket sales.

(3)          New lottery that began operations in 2005, sales commenced in October 2005 and November 2005 for instant and online tickets, respectively.

(4)          A new contract commences July 2006 and continues through July 2011, with an available five year extension.

(5)          New contract commencing in 2006.

*                    Fiscal 2005 is the year ended June 30, 2005, except for New York which is March 31, 2005; Texas which is August 31, 2005 and Michigan which is September 30, 2005.

**             ITRS= Instant ticket and related services.

**             Video = Video lottery service contract.

Pari-mutuel Group

We are a leading worldwide supplier of technologically advanced computerized wagering systems and related equipment. We also provide simulcasting and telecommunications services and telephone and internet account wagering.

North American Pari-mutuel Operations.   In 2005, we believe that our systems processed 50% of the estimated $19 billion in pari-mutuel wagering conducted on racing in North America. We typically provide, install and maintain the necessary pari-mutuel wagering systems and equipment for our North American pari-mutuel customers, and we also provide race simulcasting and telecommunications services, video gaming terminals, and telephone and internet account wagering systems.

11




The pari-mutuel wagering systems we provide in North America typically include the terminals or account wagering devices that accept wagers and issue the wagering tickets, the central processing unit that calculates the betting odds of a particular event and tabulates and accounts for the Handle, the display board that indicates the betting odds of a particular event and the communication equipment necessary for additional wagering from sources outside the wagering facility. These systems utilize high volume, real-time transaction and data processing networks managed by central computers, communications equipment, special purpose microcomputer-based terminals, peripheral and display equipment and operations and applications software. The type of central processing unit and the number of ticket-issuing terminals used in a system are generally determined by the physical layout and amount of wagering at each facility. We also provide additional software and other support functions.

Our networks link multiple racetracks, OTBs, and regional networks of racetracks and OTBs to one another via dedicated, secure, high-speed communications channels, enabling operators to capitalize on the growth of the off-track wagering market in a more cost-effective manner. Additionally, when linked to our other regional and national pari-mutuel wagering networks, these networks provide our customers with access to new markets and revenue sources by increasing the number and variety of wagering opportunities that customers can offer to their patrons. In North America, we currently operate regional pari-mutuel wagering networks in California, Connecticut, Florida, Illinois, New Jersey, New York, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Texas, Washington, West Virginia, Puerto Rico, British Columbia and Ontario.

Our pari-mutuel wagering system contracts typically have an initial term of five years. Our contracts contain certain warranties regarding implementation, operation, performance and reliability of our wagering systems relating to, among other things, data accuracy, repairs and validation procedures. The terms of our warranties vary from contract to contract. We also provide the operations, maintenance and supervisory personnel necessary to operate the pari-mutuel wagering system. We maintain ownership of the pari-mutuel wagering systems, which enables us to employ such equipment in more than one racetrack at different times during the year as most customers do not operate live wagering all year long.

We typically receive revenue for our services in North America as a varying percentage of Handle, generally ranging up to approximately 0.65% of the Handle on a particular event (with a weighted average of approximately 0.31% of the Handle), subject, in many instances, to minimum fees which are usually exceeded under normal operating conditions. Minimum fees under our service contracts are generally based on the number of days the facility operates, as well as other factors, including the type of system and number of terminals installed at the facility. In addition to the Handle-based fees and minimums, fees for extra equipment and services may be charged, particularly for new terminal models and equipment levels which exceed those originally contracted.

In addition, we may also receive an “interface fee” of 0.125% or 0.15% of Handle for combining wagers into the combined pools of host tracks whose systems we operate, depending on whether we or another vendor provides such wagering services.

International Pari-mutuel Operations.   In most international markets, we sell, deliver and install pari-mutuel wagering systems in racetracks and OTBs rather than operating them pursuant to service contracts. We have systems operating in approximately 24 countries. Each of these systems is customized to meet the unique needs of our customers, including game designs, regulatory requirements, language preferences, network communication standards and other key elements. The sale of a pari-mutuel wagering system includes a license for use of our proprietary system software as well as installation, training, technical assistance, support, accessories and limited spare parts.

In other international markets, we provide pari-mutuel services similar to those provided by our pari-mutuel operations in North America. In Germany, we provide pari-mutuel wagering systems and simulcasting services to the 9 major harness racetracks, the 16 major thoroughbred racetracks, approximately 50 OTBs and approximately 120 bookmaker shops. In Ireland, we provide ongoing

12




maintenance and operating services through 2008 to Tote Ireland Ltd., a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Irish Horseracing Authority. In Turkey, we have provided a pari-mutuel system and associated maintenance services to the Turkey Jockey Club since 1995. Our international pari-mutuel wagering services are comparable to those deployed in North America and include computer software, ticket terminals, a central processing unit, display boards and communication equipment. These services are provided under long-term contracts of five to ten years. We have generally been successful in renewing these contracts.

Simulcasting.   We are one of the leading providers of simulcasts of live horse and greyhound racing and jai alai matches to racetracks, OTBs, jai alai frontons and casinos in North America and Europe. We simulcast racing events from over 60 racetracks and jai alai frontons to more than 185 racetracks and almost 1,100 OTBs throughout North America. We provide similar services in Europe, particularly in the Netherlands and Germany, where we service all 30 racetracks and more than 200 OTBs and bookmaker shops.

Simulcasting of races entails the encryption and transmission of an audio/video signal from one of our uplink trucks located at a racetrack to one of three satellite transponders we lease pursuant to long-term contracts, and the retransmission of this signal to other racetracks, OTBs and casinos, where the race signal is received and decoded for viewing. In general, we receive a daily event fee from the racetracks for up-linking the video and audio signals and a monthly fee from racetracks, OTBs and casinos for the signal sent to our decoders.

Our encryption/transmission equipment compresses each audio/video signal so that multiple signals can be transmitted via one satellite transponder. This technology maximizes the transmission capacity of each of our transponders. Any capacity that we do not use for our simulcasting contracts represents excess time that we may sell to other users of satellite communications, generally for short periods, but, from time to time, under long-term contracts.

NASRIN®.   In conjunction with our 70% interest in a joint venture with Churchill Downs, Inc., we operate a national voice/data telecommunications network, known as the North American Simulcast Racing Information Network, or NASRIN®, that serves almost 225 racetracks and OTBs. NASRIN® securely transmits betting data at a fraction of the cost previously paid by the racetracks and other facilities, allowing racetracks and OTBs to expand their simulcast wagering opportunities. The system is designed to link all wagering locations in North America and to serve as a platform for future technology developments. In exchange for our services, we are paid certain fees based on bandwidth and level of service.

Venue Management Group

We own and have the right to operate in perpetuity substantially all off-track pari-mutuel wagering in Connecticut, subject to our compliance with certain licensing requirements. Our Connecticut operations consist of 11 OTB facilities, including video simulcasting at two teletheaters and four other branches, and telephone account wagering for customers in 25 states. We also now hold one of five OTB licenses within the state of Maine. We are also the exclusive licensed operator for all pari-mutuel wagering in the Netherlands, with four racetracks and 28 OTBs under a contract continuing through June 2008. Our revenues are based on a weighted average percentage of the Handle wagered at our OTB venues, which ranges from 21% to 32%. We also provide facilities management services to the five licensed wagering operators under five year contracts.

In Connecticut, approximately $200 million was wagered in fiscal 2005 on more than 80 U.S.-based thoroughbred, harness and greyhound racetracks and jai alai frontons at or through our facilities. Since we commenced operations in 1993, we have implemented product and service enhancements, including expanded simulcasting from across the country, common-pool wagering, seven day per week operations at

13




nine locations and expanded telephone wagering. Our revenues are based on an allowed percentage of Handle wagered through the Connecticut OTB. The percentage of the total Handle, or commission, which we may receive, is determined by the track and or the state where the event is held and varies by type of wager. Our weighted average commission, based on Handle, for our Connecticut operations is approximately 21%. During the seven months we have operated the OTB located in Waterville Maine approximately $3.6 million has been wagered. We have implemented the same product and service enhancements to the Maine operation that we have had success with in Connecticut. We also provide an extension of our OTB services, including pari-mutuel wagering and simulcasting services, to the Mohegan Tribal Gaming Authority for its racebook located at the Mohegan Sun Casino in Uncasville, Connecticut which has just signed a new five year contract extension. We believe this racebook is a state-of-the-art facility which incorporates the latest wagering technology and the most advanced audio and video simulcasting signals. We have also entered into several similar agreements to provide the same simulcasting and pari-mutuel services with four other licensed wagering operators.

We have the right to operate all on-track and off-track pari-mutuel wagering in the Netherlands under a license granted by the Dutch Ministry of Agriculture which extends through June 30, 2008. We currently operate 28 OTBs throughout the Netherlands, four on-track OTBs, as well as at four tracks. Our weighted average commission, based on Handle, for our Dutch operations is approximately 30%.

Telecommunications Products Group

We are a leading manufacturer of prepaid phone cards in Europe, which entitle cellular phone users to a defined value of airtime. Prepaid phone cards offer consumers worldwide a cost-effective way to purchase cellular airtime, without requiring phone companies to extend credit or consumers to commit to contracts. We believe that we provide approximately 25% of the fragmented European market for prepaid cellular phone cards and we believe we are the largest supplier of paper-based prepaid phone cards in the world. To deter fraud, our phone cards incorporate proprietary security technology originally developed for our lottery ticket operations. We expect to participate in the anticipated continued growth in the cellular market. We sell our prepaid phone cards to phone companies for a per unit price.

For additional information concerning our business and geographic segments, see Note 18 to the Consolidated Financial Statements.

Contract Procurement

Lottery Group

Government operated lotteries in the U.S. typically operate under state-mandated public procurement regulations. See “Government Regulation”. Lotteries select an instant ticket or online supplier by issuing a Request for Proposal, or RFP, which outlines contractual obligations as well as products and services to be delivered. An evaluation committee frequently comprised of key lottery staff evaluates responses based on various criteria. These criteria usually include quality of product, security plan and features, experience in the industry, quality of personnel and services to be delivered and price. We believe that our product functionality, the quality of our personnel, our technical expertise and our manufacturing efficiency may give us many advantages relative to the competition when responding to state lottery RFPs. However, many lotteries still award the contract to the qualified vendor with the lowest price, regardless of factors other than price. Contract awards by lottery authorities are sometimes challenged by unsuccessful competitors, which can result in protracted legal proceedings. Internationally, lottery authorities do not always utilize such a formal bidding process, but rather negotiate with one or more potential vendors.

U.S. instant ticket lottery contracts typically have an initial term of three years and frequently include multiple renewal options, which our customers have generally exercised for additional periods ranging

14




from one to five years. Our U.S. online lottery contracts typically have a minimum initial term of five years, with additional renewal options. The length of these lottery contracts, together with their renewal options, limits the number of contracts available for bidding in any given year.

Pari-mutuel Group

Contract awards by owners of horse and greyhound racetracks, OTBs and casinos and jai alai frontons, and from state and foreign governments, often involve a lengthy competitive bid process, spanning from specification development to contract negotiation and award. In recent years, there has been continued consolidation of racetrack ownership, which may increase the competitive nature of the contract procurement process. Our contracts for the provision of pari-mutuel systems services in North America are typically for terms of five years. In addition, our ancillary pari-mutuel services, such as simulcasting, are typically provided under one-year contracts.

Venue Management Group

Our license to provide on-track and off-track services in the Netherlands extends through June 2008. New venue management opportunities generally occur via the privatization of existing government operated OTBs, as in the cases of Connecticut and the Netherlands, the acquisition or outsourcing of an existing private racetrack or OTB operations, as with our 2005 acquisition of the OTB in Maine, or new legislation or regulation enabling new distribution channels. These opportunities occur infrequently and may be subject to public procurement bidding requirements.

Telecommunications Products Group

All telecommunications products customers issue purchase orders with agreed upon terms and conditions. In addition, certain customer purchase orders contain multiple delivery dates.

Research and Product Development

We believe that our ability to attract new lottery and wagering system customers and retain existing customers depends in part on our ability to continue to incorporate technological advances into, and to improve, our products, systems and related equipment. We maintain a development program directed toward systems development as well as toward the improvement and refinement of our present products and the expansion of their uses and applications. Many of our product developments and innovations have quickly become industry standards.

Intellectual Property

We have a number of U.S. and foreign patents that we consider, in the aggregate, to be of material importance to our business. Patents extend for varying periods of time according to the date of patent filing or grant and the legal term of patents in the various countries where patent protection is obtained. In the U.S., the term of a patent generally expires 20 years from the date of filing. The actual protection afforded by a patent, which can vary from country to country, depends upon the type of patent, the scope of its coverage and the availability of legal remedies in the country.

Certain technology material to our lottery and pari-mutuel wagering products, processes and systems is the subject of patents issued, and patent applications currently pending, in the U.S. and certain other countries. In our lottery business, we utilize our patented and patent-pending technology for the production, secure printing, validation and distribution of instant lottery tickets. In our pari-mutuel business, our patent-pending systems and methods provide racing and wagering data and related information. Most of our material patents are not scheduled to expire until 2013 or later. Two of our early patents for scratch ticket construction are set to expire later this year, which will not have a material effect

15




as later patents that we own encompass the technology that we currently use as a part of our scratch ticket manufacturing processes.

We also have a number of U.S. and foreign registered trademarks and other common law trademark rights for certain of our products, including Winner’s Choice™, Play Central™, Terra 2000®, SciScan Technology®, Aegis™, PROBE®, EXTREMA®, SGI-NET™, ECLIPSE™, NASRIN®, QUANTUM™, SAM®, STAN™, MAX®, TINY TIM®, On the Wire®, Autotote.com™ and others. Trademark protection continues in some countries, including the U.S., for as long as the mark is used and in other countries for as long as it is registered. Registrations generally are for fixed, but renewable, terms.

In our lottery business, we have entered into a product development agreement pursuant to which we have an exclusive license to use certain third-party patented technology in our SciScan Technology® terminals. Subject to clauses providing for early termination, the agreement is scheduled to remain in effect until 2017. In our pari-mutuel business, we have a perpetual license to use certain software to monitor our simulcast systems, and a consortium of which we are a party has a license, scheduled to expire in 2021, to use certain software that supplies the database and various interfaces for our TrackPlay™ Internet and interactive television-based wagering platform. None of our licenses is material to our business as a whole. The software and control systems for our wagering systems are also the subject of copyright and/or trade secret laws.

From time to time we become aware of potential infringement of our intellectual property by competitors and other third parties and consider what action, if any, to take in that regard. Accordingly, we have filed a lawsuit against a competitor of ours alleging that it has infringed two of our patents. Otherwise we are not aware of any pending claims of infringement regarding our patents, trademarks or other intellectual property in any of our current businesses. We are also aware of pending claims against us in two separate matters alleging the infringement of a total of four third party patents as set forth in the Legal Proceedings discussion below.

Seasonality

The first and fourth quarters of the calendar year traditionally comprise the weakest seasons for our pari-mutuel wagering businesses. As a result of inclement weather during the winter months, a number of racetracks do not operate and those that do operate often experience missed racing days. This adversely affects the amounts wagered and our corresponding service revenues. Wagering equipment sales and software license revenues usually reflect a limited number of large transactions, which do not recur on an annual basis. Consequently, revenues and operating results can vary substantially from period to period as a result of the timing of revenue recognition for major equipment sales and software license revenue. In addition, instant ticket and prepaid phone card sales may vary depending on the season and timing of contract awards, changes in customer budgets, ticket inventory levels, lottery retail sales and general economic conditions.

Production Processes; Sources and Availability of Components

Our dedicated computer-controlled printing process is specifically designed to produce secure instant lottery game tickets for governmentally sanctioned lotteries and promotional games as well as prepaid phone cards. Our facilities are designed for efficient, secure production of instant game tickets and support high-speed variable image printing, packaging and storage of instant game tickets. Instant ticket games are delivered finished and ready for distribution by the lottery authority, or by us in the jurisdictions which are part of an instant ticket contract with cooperative services. Paper and ink are the principal raw materials consumed in our ticket manufacturing operations. We have a variety of sources for both paper and ink and therefore, should not be dependent on any particular supplier.

16




Production of our lottery and pari-mutuel wagering systems and related component products primarily involves the assembly of electronic components into more complex systems and products. We produce our terminal products primarily at our manufacturing facility in Ballymahon, Ireland, or on a limited basis at our Georgia development facility. Other manufacturing may be contracted out to third party vendors, as needed.

We normally have sufficient lead time between reaching an agreement to provide a lottery or pari-mutuel wagering system and the commencement of operations so that we are able to provide the customer with a fully functioning system, customized to meet its requirements. In the event that current suppliers of central processing units were no longer available, we believe we would be able to adapt our application software to run on the then-available hardware in time to allow us to meet new contractual obligations, although the price competitiveness of our products might change. The lead time for obtaining most of the electronic components we use is approximately 90 days. We believe that this is consistent with our competitors’ lead times and is also consistent with the needs of our customers.

Competition

Lottery Group

The instant ticket and online lottery business is highly competitive, and our business faces competition from a number of domestic and foreign instant ticket manufacturers, online lottery system providers and other competitors, some of whom have substantially greater financial resources than we do. Our business continues to operate in a period of intense price-based competition. The award of contracts by state officials is influenced by factors including price, the ability to optimize lottery revenues through game design, technical capability, marketing capability and applications, the quality, dependability and upgrade capability of the network, production capacity, the security and integrity of the vendor’s production operations, the experience, financial condition and reputation of the vendor and the satisfaction of other requirements and qualifications that lottery authorities may impose. Contract awards by lottery authorities are sometimes challenged by unsuccessful competitors, which can result in protracted legal proceedings that can result in delayed implementation or cancellation of the award.

We currently have three instant lottery ticket competitors in the U.S.: Pollard Banknote Limited, or Pollard, Oberthur Gaming Technologies, or OGT, a subsidiary of Group Francois-Charles Oberthur of France, and Creative Games International, Inc., or Creative Games, a subsidiary of Canadian Bank Note Company, Ltd. We estimate that the retail sales value of our U.S. customer base was approximately 67% of total U.S. instant ticket retail sales in 2005. Except as permitted by the applicable provisions of the North American Free Trade Act with respect to Canada and Mexico, it is currently illegal to import lottery tickets into the U.S. from a foreign country. Our business could be adversely affected should additional foreign competitors in Canada or Mexico export their lottery products to the U.S. or should other foreign competitors establish printing facilities in the U.S., Canada or Mexico to supply the U.S. market. Internationally, there are many lottery instant ticket vendors which compete with us including, among others, Pollard, OGT and Creative Games.

Our principal competitors in the U.S. online lottery systems business are Gtech Corporation (with approximately 72% of the U.S. market based on retail sales) and Intralot Technologies, Inc. or Intralot. Gtech Corporation is also our major competitor in the international online market along with Intralot, International Lottery and Totalizator Systems, Inc. and a few other companies.

Pari-mutuel Group

Our pari-mutuel operations face significant competition from other operators in the pari-mutuel business, other gaming venues such as casinos and state sponsored lotteries and other forms of legal and illegal gaming. In addition, in recent years the ownership of racetracks increasingly has been consolidated

17




thereby strengthening their ability to negotiate price and other terms. We compete primarily on the basis of the design, performance, reliability and pricing of our products as well as customer service. To effectively compete, we expect to make continued investments in product development and/or acquisitions of technology.

Our two principal competitors in the North American pari-mutuel wagering systems business are AmTote International, Inc. and United Tote Company, a subsidiary of Youbet.com, Inc. Our competition outside of North America is more fragmented, with competition being provided by several international and regional companies. In addition, we believe we are one of the leading providers in North America of video and data simulcasting services to the racing industry. Current and future competitors in internet-based wagering include Youbet.com, Inc. and TVG.

Venue Management Group

Our venue management business competes with other pari-mutuel operations as well as other forms of gaming and other entertainment. Competition for wagers comes from casinos, racetracks, lotteries and other forms of legal and illegal gambling. Other gaming competitors operate in our licensed markets and in surrounding areas and compete for our customers, and additional competitors could be licensed, or existing regulations could be changed, so as to adversely affect our competitive position.

Telecommunications Products Group

The market for prepaid phone cards is highly fragmented, but competition comes from other instant ticket lottery printers utilizing lottery security and printing technologies, as well as alternative printing and non-printing technologies. Our telecommunications products operations compete with other printing companies on the basis of price, availability, product features and product security. There is competition within our class of products and other technologies to provide the desired functionality. There are alternative technologies such as smart cards or alternative means to provide the funding of telephone services. We have invested in new higher speed and higher capacity printing and packaging technologies that we believe, in combination with our lottery security and logistics expertise, will continue to provide us a competitive advantage in this market. Our competitors in this area include OGT, Schlumberger Limited and Gemplus S.A.

Security

Attempts to penetrate security measures may come from various combinations of customers, retailers, vendors, employees and others. We constantly assess the adequacy of our security systems to protect against any material loss to any of our customers. During 2004, we created the office of Vice President, Security and Compliance with responsibilities for overseeing our security systems and procedures.

In our pari-mutuel business, we employ numerous security measures, including physical security, operational controls and computer system security measures. These measures include, but are not limited to, the installation of software designed to scan all wagering pools in connection with multi-race wagers after each race of a multi-race wager and deployment of a control system that runs in parallel with our totalizator systems, records data in real time and allows for third party review of all data against the live system.

In our lottery business, we employ numerous security safeguards, including bar coding and providing additional layers of protection in our instant tickets. We have effected security measures in the areas of ticket specifications, production, packaging, delivery, distribution and accounting. We also incorporate computer function safeguards, including secure ticket data, control number encryption, winner file data, and ticket stock control, in our data processing and in the computer operations phase. In addition, we also

18




retain a major public accounting firm to perform agreed upon security procedures for each game produced before it is sent to the customer.

As the incidence and severity of publicly reported cases of physical and computer crime continue, major lotteries periodically reassess key security questions concerning the vulnerability of lottery games. Although we have not uncovered any practical, economically feasible way to breach the security of our instant tickets or online lottery games that could result in a material loss to any of our customers, no assurances can be given that security breaches will not occur.

Employees

As of December 31, 2005, we employed approximately 4,000 persons. Most of our U.S. pari-mutuel employees involved in field operations are represented by the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers under contract, extending through October 2009. Most of our Canadian pari-mutuel employees are represented by the Service Employees International Union. Our lottery employee groups are represented by two labor unions: our employees in Austria are represented by a Worker’s Council, which is typical of many European companies; and at the United Kingdom facility, approximately 250 employees are members of the Graphic Paper and Media Union.

Government Regulation

General

Lotteries, pari-mutuel wagering, sports wagering, and video gaming may be lawfully conducted only in jurisdictions that have enacted enabling legislation. In jurisdictions that currently permit various wagering activities, regulation is extensive and evolving but customarily includes some form of licensing of a license applicant and its subsidiaries. Regulators in those jurisdictions review many facets of an applicant for or holder of a license including, among other items, financial stability, integrity and business experience. We believe we are currently in substantial compliance with all regulatory requirements in the jurisdictions where we operate. Any failure to receive a material license or the loss of a material license that we currently hold could have a material adverse effect on our overall operations and financial condition.

While we believe that our current and planned business activities comply with all applicable laws, law enforcement authorities in certain jurisdictions have opposed the expansion of wagering via telephone and the internet. We cannot assure you that our activities or the activities of our customers will not become the subject of any law enforcement proceeding or that such proceeding, if any, would not have a material adverse impact on us or our business plans.

We have developed and implemented an extensive internal compliance program in an effort to ensure that we comply with legal requirements imposed in connection with our wagering-related activities, as well as legal requirements generally applicable to all publicly traded corporations. The compliance program is managed on a day-to-day basis by two full time compliance officers and is overseen by the Compliance Committee authorized by our Board of Directors. While we are firmly committed to full compliance with all applicable laws, there can be no assurance that such steps will prevent the violation of one or more laws or regulations, or that a violation by us or an employee will not result in the imposition of a monetary fine or suspension or revocation of one or more of our licenses.

Lottery Operations

At the present time, 44 U.S. jurisdictions, all the Canadian provinces, Mexico and many other foreign countries authorize lotteries. Lottery contracts and ongoing operations of lotteries both domestically and abroad are subject to extensive regulation. Although certain of the features of a lottery, such as the percentage of gross revenues that must be paid back to players in prize money, are usually fixed by legislation, the various lottery regulatory authorities generally exercise significant discretion, including the

19




determination of the types of games played, the price of each wager, the manner in which the lottery is marketed and the selection of the vendors of equipment and services and retailers of lottery products. Furthermore, laws and regulations applicable to lotteries in the U.S. and foreign jurisdictions are subject to change, and the effect of such changes on our ongoing and potential operations cannot be predicted with certainty.

To ensure the integrity of the contract award and wagering process, most jurisdictions require detailed background disclosure on a continuous basis from, and conduct background investigations of, the vendor, its officers and directors, its subsidiaries and affiliates and its principal shareholders. Background investigations of the vendor’s employees who will be directly responsible for the operation of the system are also generally conducted, and most states reserve the right to require the removal of employees whom they deem to be unsuitable or whose presence they believe may adversely affect the operational security or integrity of the lottery. Certain jurisdictions also require extensive personal and financial disclosure and background checks from persons and entities beneficially owning a specified percentage (typically five percent or more) of a vendor’s securities. The failure of beneficial owners of our securities to submit to background checks and provide such disclosure could result in the imposition of penalties upon these beneficial owners and could jeopardize the award of a lottery contract to us or provide grounds for termination of an existing lottery contract.

From time to time we retain governmental affairs representatives in various states of the U.S. to advise legislators and the public concerning our views on lottery legislation, to monitor such legislation and to advise us in our relations with lottery authorities. We also make campaign contributions to various state political parties and state political candidates. In connection with our efforts in North Carolina, in early November 2005, we were advised that the North Carolina Secretary of State referred to the North Carolina Attorney General for investigation alleged misdemeanor violations of the North Carolina Lobbying Act by our subsidiary Scientific Games International, Inc. and one of its now former employees for alleged failure to timely register as a lobbyist. We are cooperating with the investigation and while no assurance can be given, we believe that the inquiry will conclude that we did not engage in any wrongdoing.

The award of lottery contracts and ongoing operations of lotteries in international jurisdictions are also extensively regulated, although this regulation usually varies from that prevailing in the U.S. Restrictions are frequently imposed on foreign corporations seeking to do business in such jurisdictions and, as a consequence, we have, in a number of instances, allied ourselves with local companies when seeking foreign lottery contracts. Laws and regulations applicable to lotteries in the U.S. and foreign jurisdictions are subject to change, and the effect of such changes on our ongoing and potential operations cannot be predicted with certainty.

Pari-mutuel Wagering

At present, 43 states in the U.S., Puerto Rico, all of the Canadian provinces, Mexico and many other foreign countries have authorized pari-mutuel wagering on horse races, and 16 states and many foreign countries, including Mexico, conduct pari-mutuel wagering on greyhound races. In addition, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Florida and Mexico also allow pari-mutuel wagering on jai alai matches.

Companies that manufacture, distribute and operate pari-mutuel wagering systems in these jurisdictions are subject to the regulations of the applicable regulatory authorities there. These authorities generally require a company, as well as its directors, officers, certain employees and holders of 5% or more of the company’s common stock, to obtain various licenses, permits and approvals. Regulatory authorities may also conduct background investigations of the company and its key personnel and stockholders in order to ensure the integrity of the wagering system. These authorities have the power to refuse, revoke or restrict a license for any cause they deem reasonable. The loss of a license in one jurisdiction may cause the company’s licensing status to come under review in other jurisdictions as well.

20




In order for any of our subsidiaries to provide pari-mutuel wagering equipment and/or services to casinos in Atlantic City, New Jersey, the subsidiary must be licensed by the New Jersey Casino Control Commission, or the Casino Commission, as a gaming related casino service industry in accordance with the New Jersey Casino Control Act, or the Casino Control Act, and by the New Jersey Racing Commission. An applicant for a gaming related casino service industry license is required to establish, by clear and convincing evidence, financial stability, integrity and responsibility; good character, honesty and integrity; and sufficient business ability and experience to conduct a successful operation. We must also qualify under the standards of the Casino Control Act. We and any of our applicant subsidiaries may also be required to produce such information, documentation and assurances as required by the regulators to establish the integrity of all our directors, officers and financial backers, who may be required to seek qualification or waiver of qualification. For affiliates of New Jersey casinos, the Casino Commission traditionally has waived the qualification requirement for investors holding less than 15% of a debt issue. For institutional investors, the Casino Commission has traditionally waived the qualification requirement for holders if their positions are not more than 20% of the issuer’s overall debt and not more than 50% of the specific debt issue.  There can be no assurance, however, that the Casino Commission will waive any qualification requirement for any holder.

The Casino Commission has broad discretion in licensing matters and may at any time condition a license or suspend or revoke a license or impose fines upon a finding of disqualification or non-compliance. The Casino Commission may require that persons holding five percent or more of our Class A common stock or instruments convertible into Class A common stock qualify under the Casino Control Act. Under the Casino Control Act, a security holder is presumed to control a publicly traded corporation if the holder owns at least five percent of the corporation’s equity securities; however, for passive institutional investors, qualification is generally not required for a position of less than 10%, and upon a showing of good cause, qualification may be excused for a position of 10% or more. Failure to qualify could jeopardize our license. In addition, the New Jersey Racing Commission also licenses our subsidiary and retains concurrent regulatory oversight over this subsidiary with the Casino Commission.

Our rights to operate the Connecticut OTB system are conditioned on our continuing to hold all licenses required for the operation of the system. In addition, our officers and directors and certain other employees must be licensed. Licensees are generally required to submit to background investigations and provide required disclosures. The Division of Special Revenue of the State of Connecticut, or the Division, may revoke the license to operate the system under certain circumstances, including a false statement in the licensing disclosure materials, a transfer of ownership of the licensed entity without Division approval and failure to meet financial obligations. The approval of the Connecticut regulatory authorities is required before any off-track betting facility is closed or relocated or any new branch or simulcast facility is established. Our telephone wagering operations, based in Connecticut, are subject to the Division’s regulation. We have expanded the market for our “business-to-consumer” On the Wire® account wagering business through our Connecticut OTB to 25 states.

While in the past we have been the subject of enforcement proceedings instituted by one or more regulatory bodies, we have been able to consensually resolve any such proceedings upon the implementation of remedial measures and/or the payment of settlements or monetary fines to such bodies. However, there can be no assurance that similar proceedings in the future will be similarly resolved, or that such proceedings will not have a material adverse impact on our ability to retain and renew existing licenses or to obtain new licenses in other jurisdictions.

Video Gaming

Coin or voucher operated gambling devices offering electronic, video versions of spinning reels, poker, blackjack and similar games are known as video gaming machines (“VGMs”) or video lottery terminals (“VLTs”), depending on the jurisdiction.

21




Fifteen, U.S. states authorize wagering on VGMs or VLTs at state regulated and licensed facilities. Although some states currently restrict VGMs and VLTs to already existing wagering facilities, others permit these devices to be placed at bars, restaurants, and specific licensed gaming facilities. In addition, all of the Canadian provinces and various other foreign countries have authorized their use. The expansion of video gaming represents a growing area in the entertainment industry.

Companies that manufacture, sell or distribute VGMs or VLTs or provide the central computer systems that monitor these devices are subject to various provincial, state, county and municipal laws and regulations. The primary purposes of these rules are (i) to ensure the responsibility, financial stability and character of companies involved and their officers and directors and stockholders through licensing requirements, (ii) to ensure the integrity and randomness of the machines, and (iii) to prohibit the use of VGMs or VLTs at unauthorized locations or for the benefit of undesirable individuals or entities. The regulations governing VGMs and VLTs generally resemble the pari-mutuel regulations in all the basic elements described above.

We have entered into contracts in certain jurisdictions to provide services and equipment for the monitor and control of video gaming and may apply for all potential contracts in jurisdictions that may now or in the future require services that our resources provide. We cannot predict the nature of the regulatory schemes or the requirements that will be adopted in any of these jurisdictions, nor whether we or any of our subsidiaries will be selected as a service provider for the jurisdiction.

Simulcasting

The Federal Communications Commission regulates the use and transfer of earth station licenses used to operate our domestic simulcasting operations.

At present, 43 U.S. states, Puerto Rico, all of the Canadian provinces, Mexico and many other foreign countries authorize interstate and/or intrastate pari-mutuel wagering, which may involve the simulcasting of the races in question. Licensing and other regulatory requirements associated with such simulcasting activities are similar to those governing pari-mutuel wagering and are generally enforced by pari-mutuel regulators. In addition, contracts with host tracks whose races are simulcast by us to other facilities within or outside the jurisdictions in which such races are held may be subject to approval by regulatory authorities in the jurisdictions from and/or to which the races are simulcast. We believe that we are in substantial compliance with applicable regulations and that we, and/or the appropriate third parties, have entered into contracts and obtained the necessary regulatory approvals to conduct current simulcast operations lawfully.

Nevada Regulatory Matters

We and certain of our 100%-owned subsidiaries are applicants or will be applicants for certain registrations, approvals, findings of suitability and licenses in the State of Nevada. Accordingly, set forth below is certain information required by Nevada law to be included herein.

The manufacture, sale and distribution of gaming devices for use or play in Nevada or for distribution outside of Nevada, the manufacture and distribution of associated equipment for use in Nevada, the operation of an off-track pari-mutuel wagering system in Nevada, the operation of an off-track pari-mutuel sports wagering system in Nevada and the operation of slot machine routes in Nevada are subject to: (i) the Nevada Gaming Control Act and the regulations promulgated thereunder, or the Nevada Act; and (ii) various local ordinances and regulations  (collectively Nevada gaming laws). Such activities are subject to the licensing and regulatory control of the Nevada Gaming Commission, the Nevada State Gaming Control Board, and various local, city and county regulatory agencies, collectively the Nevada gaming authorities.

22




The laws, regulations and supervisory procedures of the Nevada gaming authorities are based upon declarations of public policy which are concerned with, among other things: (i) the prevention of unsavory or unsuitable persons from having a direct or indirect involvement with gaming, or manufacturing or distribution of gaming devices at any time or in any capacity; (ii) the strict regulation of all persons, locations, practices, associations and activities related to the operation of licensed gaming establishments and the manufacture or distribution of gaming devices and equipment; (iii) the establishment and maintenance of responsible accounting practices and procedures; (iv) the maintenance of effective controls over the financial practices of licensees, including the establishment of minimum procedures for internal fiscal affairs and the safeguarding of assets and revenues, providing reliable record keeping and requiring the filing of periodic reports with the Nevada gaming authorities; (v) the prevention of cheating and fraudulent practices; and (vi) to provide a source of state and local revenues through taxation and licensing fees. Changes in such laws, regulations and procedures could have an adverse effect on our various applications in the event they are granted. The grant or denial of the applications is within the discretion of the Nevada gaming authorities. There can be no assurances that the pending applications by us and our subsidiaries operating in Nevada will be approved or that, if approved, they will be approved on a timely basis or without conditions or limitations.

We are an applicant for registration by the Nevada Gaming Commission as a publicly traded corporation and are or will be an applicant to be found suitable to own the stock, both directly and indirectly of various 100%-owned subsidiaries which are or will be applicants for approvals and licensing as a manufacturer, distributor and operator of a slot machine route, an operator of an off-track pari-mutuel wagering system and an operator of an off-track pari-mutuel sports wagering system. Our officers, directors and key employees who are actively and directly involved in the licensed activities of our subsidiaries operating in Nevada may be required to be licensed or found suitable by the Nevada gaming authorities. In addition, certain of our shareholders may have to be found suitable. Any beneficial holder of our voting securities, regardless of the number of shares owned, may be required to file an application, be investigated, and have his suitability determined as a beneficial holder of our voting securities if the Nevada Gaming Commission has reason to believe that such ownership would otherwise be inconsistent with the declared policies of the state of Nevada. The applicant must pay all costs of investigation incurred by the Nevada gaming authorities in conducting any such investigation. The Nevada Act requires any person who acquires beneficial ownership of more than 5% of a registered corporation’s voting securities to report the acquisition to the Nevada Gaming Commission. The Nevada Act requires that beneficial owners of more than 10% of a registered corporation’s voting securities apply to the Nevada Gaming Commission for a finding of suitability within thirty days after the Chairman of the Nevada Gaming Control Board mails the written notice requiring such filing. Under certain circumstances, an “institutional investor,” as defined in the Nevada Act, which acquires more than 10%, but not more than 15%, of the registered corporation’s voting securities may apply to the Nevada Gaming Commission for a waiver of such finding of suitability if such institutional investor holds the voting securities for investment purposes only. An institutional investor shall not be deemed to hold voting securities for investment purposes unless the voting securities were acquired and are held in the ordinary course of business as an institutional investor and not for the purpose of causing, directly or indirectly, the election of a majority of the members of the board of directors of the registered corporation, any change in the registered corporation’s corporate charter, bylaws, management, policies or operations of the registered corporation, or any of its gaming affiliates, or any other action which the Nevada Gaming Commission finds to be inconsistent with holding the registered corporation’s voting securities for investment purposes only. Activities which are not deemed to be inconsistent with holding voting securities for investment purposes only include: (i) voting on all matters voted on by stockholders; (ii) making financial and other inquiries of management of the type normally made by securities analysts for informational purposes and not to cause a change in its management, policies or operations; and (iii) such other activities as the Nevada Gaming Commission may determine to be consistent with such investment intent.

23




We and our subsidiaries operating in Nevada will be required to maintain a current stock ledger in Nevada, which may be examined by the Nevada gaming authorities at any time. If any securities are held in trust by an agent or by a nominee, the record holder may be required to disclose the identity of the beneficial owner to the Nevada gaming authorities. A failure to make such disclosure may be grounds for finding the record holder unsuitable. We are also required to render maximum assistance in determining the identity of the beneficial owner. The Nevada Gaming Commission has the power to require our stock certificates to bear a legend indicating that the securities are subject to the Nevada Act.

If the beneficial holder of voting securities who must be licensed or found suitable is a corporation, partnership or trust, it must submit detailed business and financial information including a list of beneficial owners. The applicant is required to pay all costs of investigation.

Also under the Nevada Act and under certain circumstances, an “institutional investor” as defined in the Nevada Act, which intends to acquire not more than 15% of any class of nonvoting securities of a privately-held corporation, limited partnership or limited liability company that is also a registered holding or intermediary company or the holder of a gaming license, may apply to the Nevada Gaming Commission for a waiver of the usual prior licensing or finding of suitability requirements if such institutional investor holds such nonvoting securities for investment purposes only. An institutional investor shall not be deemed to hold nonvoting securities for investment purposes unless the nonvoting securities were acquired and are held in the ordinary course of business as an institutional investor, do not give the institutional investor management authority, and do not, directly or indirectly, allow the institutional investor to vote for the election or appointment of members of the board of directors, a general partner or manager, cause any change in the articles of organization, operating agreement, other organic document, management, policies or operations, or cause any other action that the Nevada Gaming Commission finds to be inconsistent with holding nonvoting securities for investment purposes only. Activities that are not deemed to be inconsistent with holding nonvoting securities for investment purposes only include: (i) nominating any candidate for election or appointment to the entity’s board of directors or equivalent in connection with a debt restructuring; (ii) making financial and other inquiries of management of the type normally made by securities analysts for informational purposes and not to cause a change in the entity’s management, policies or operations; and (iii) such other activities as the Nevada Gaming Commission may determine to be consistent with such investment intent. If the beneficial holder of nonvoting securities who must be licensed or found suitable is a corporation, partnership or trust, it must submit detailed business and financial information including a list of beneficial owners. The applicant is required to pay all costs of investigation.

Any person who fails or refuses to apply for a finding of suitability or a license within thirty days after being ordered to do so by the Nevada Gaming Commission or the Chairman of the Nevada Gaming Control Board, may be found unsuitable. The same restrictions apply to a record owner if the record owner, after request, fails to identify the beneficial owner. Any stockholder found unsuitable and who holds, directly or indirectly, any beneficial ownership of the common stock beyond such period of time as may be prescribed by the Nevada Gaming Commission may be guilty of a criminal offense. We will be subject to disciplinary action if, after we receive notice that a person is unsuitable to be a stockholder or to have any other relationship with us, our subsidiaries operating in Nevada or we (i) pay that person any dividend or interest upon our voting securities, (ii) allow that person to exercise, directly or indirectly, any voting right conferred through securities held by that person, (iii) pay remuneration in any form to that person for services rendered or otherwise, or (iv) fail to pursue all lawful efforts to require such unsuitable person to relinquish his voting securities including, if necessary, the immediate purchase of said voting securities for cash at fair market value.

The Nevada Gaming Commission may, in its discretion, require the holder of any debt security of a registered corporation to file applications, be investigated and be found suitable to own the debt security of a registered corporation if the Nevada Gaming Commission has reason to believe that his acquisition of

24




such debt security would otherwise be inconsistent with the declared policy of the State of Nevada. If the Nevada Gaming Commission determines that a person is unsuitable to own such security, then pursuant to the Nevada Act, the registered corporation can be sanctioned, including the loss of its approvals, if without the prior approval of the Nevada Gaming Commission, it: (i) pays to the unsuitable person any dividend, interest, or any distribution whatsoever; (ii) recognizes any voting right by such unsuitable person in connection with such securities; (iii) pays the unsuitable person remuneration in any form; or (iv) makes any payment to the unsuitable person by way of principal, redemption, conversion, exchange, liquidation, or similar transaction.

The Nevada gaming authorities may deny an application for licensing for any cause that they deem reasonable. A finding of suitability is comparable to licensing, and both require submission of detailed personal and financial information followed by a thorough investigation. The applicant or the entity with which the applicant is employed or for which the applicant serves must pay all the costs of the investigation. Changes in licensed positions must be reported to the Nevada gaming authorities and in addition to their authority to deny an application for a finding of suitability or licensure, the Nevada gaming authorities have jurisdiction to disapprove a change in a corporate position.

As a registered corporation, we will be required periodically to submit detailed financial and operating reports to the Nevada Gaming Commission and furnish any other information that the Nevada Gaming Commission may require. No person may become a stockholder of, or receive any percentage of profits from, our subsidiaries operating in Nevada without first obtaining licenses and approvals from the Nevada gaming authorities. We and our subsidiaries operating in Nevada have or will apply to the Nevada gaming authorities for the various registrations, approvals, permits, findings of suitability and licenses to engage in manufacturing, distribution, slot route activities, and off-track pari-mutuel wagering systems operations in Nevada.

The following regulatory requirements may apply to us and our subsidiaries operating in Nevada if we and our subsidiaries are approved and licensed. All gaming devices and cashless wagering systems that are manufactured, sold or distributed for use or play in Nevada, or for distribution outside of Nevada, must be manufactured by licensed manufacturers and distributed or sold by licensed distributors. The Nevada Gaming Commission must approve all gaming devices manufactured for use or play in Nevada before distribution or exposure for play. The approval process for gaming devices includes rigorous testing by the Nevada Gaming Control Board, a field trial and a determination as to whether the gaming device meets strict technical standards that are set forth in the regulations of the Nevada Gaming Commission. Associated equipment must be administratively approved by the Chairman of the Nevada Gaming Control Board before distribution or use in Nevada.

The Nevada gaming authorities may investigate any individual who has a material relationship to, or material involvement with, us or our subsidiaries operating in Nevada to determine whether such individual is suitable or should be licensed as a business associate of a gaming licensee. Officers, directors and certain key employees of our subsidiaries operating in Nevada must file applications with the Nevada gaming authorities and may be required to be licensed or found suitable by the Nevada gaming authorities.

If the Nevada gaming authorities were to find an officer, director or key employee unsuitable for licensing or unsuitable to continue having a relationship with us or our subsidiaries operating in Nevada, the companies involved would have to sever all relationships with such person. In addition, the Nevada Gaming Commission may require us and our subsidiaries operating in Nevada to terminate the employment of any person who refuses to file appropriate applications. Determinations of suitability or of questions pertaining to licensing are not subject to judicial review in Nevada.

We and our subsidiaries operating in Nevada will be required to submit detailed financial and operating reports to the Nevada Gaming Commission. Substantially all material loans, leases, sales of securities and similar financing transactions by our subsidiaries operating in Nevada will be required to be

25




reported to or approved by the Nevada Gaming Commission. If we are licensed by the Nevada gaming authorities, any (i) guarantees issued by our subsidiaries operating in Nevada in connection with any public financing; (ii) hypothecation of the assets of our subsidiaries operating in Nevada as security in connection with any public financing; and/or (iii) pledges of the equity securities of our subsidiaries operating in Nevada as security in connection with any financing will require the approval of the Nevada Gaming Commission to remain effective. If it were determined that the Nevada Act was violated by us or any of our subsidiaries operating in Nevada, the licenses we or they hold could be limited, conditioned, suspended or revoked, subject to compliance with certain statutory and regulatory procedures. In addition, any of our subsidiaries operating in Nevada, we and the persons involved could be subject to substantial fines for each separate violation of the Nevada Act at the discretion of the Nevada Gaming Commission. Limitation, conditioning or suspension of the licenses held by us and our subsidiaries operating in Nevada could (and revocation of any license would) materially adversely affect our manufacturing, distribution and system operations in Nevada.

After becoming a registered corporation, we may not make a public offering of our securities without the prior approval of the Nevada Gaming Commission if the securities or proceeds from that sale are intended to be used to construct, acquire or finance gaming facilities in Nevada, or to retire or extend obligations incurred for such purposes. Such approval, if given, does not constitute a finding, recommendation or approval by the Nevada Gaming Commission or the Nevada Gaming Control Board as to the accuracy or adequacy of the prospectus or the investment merits of the securities offered. Any representation to the contrary is unlawful. While we are not yet subject to the provisions of the Nevada Act or the regulations of the Nevada Gaming Commission, such regulations also provide that any entity that is not an “affiliated company,” as such term is defined in the Nevada Act, or which is not otherwise subject to the Nevada Act or such regulations, which plans to make a public offering of securities intending to use such securities, or the proceeds from the sale thereof, for the construction or operation of gaming facilities in Nevada, or to retire or extend obligations incurred for such purposes, may apply to the Nevada Gaming Commission for prior approval of such offering. The Nevada Gaming Commission may find an applicant unsuitable based solely on the fact that it did not submit such an application, unless upon a written request for a ruling, the Nevada Gaming Control Board Chairman has ruled that it is not necessary to submit an application.

Changes in control of a registered corporation through merger, consolidation, stock or asset acquisitions, management or consulting agreements, or any act or conduct by a person whereby he obtains control, may not occur without the prior approval of the Nevada Gaming Commission. Entities seeking to acquire control of a registered corporation must satisfy the Nevada Gaming Control Board and the Nevada Gaming Commission in a variety of stringent standards prior to assuming control of such Registered Corporation. The Nevada Gaming Commission may also require controlling stockholders, officers, directors and other persons having a material relationship or involvement with the entity proposing to acquire control, to be investigated and licensed as part of the approval process relating to the transaction.

The Nevada Legislature has declared that some corporate acquisitions opposed by management, repurchases of voting securities and corporate defense tactics affecting Nevada corporate gaming licensees, and registered corporations that are affiliated with those operations, may be injurious to stable and productive corporate gaming. The Nevada Gaming Commission has established a regulatory scheme to ameliorate the potentially adverse effects of these business practices upon Nevada’s gaming industry and to further Nevada’s policy to: (i) assure the financial stability of corporate gaming licensees and their affiliates; (ii) preserve the beneficial aspects of conducting business in the corporate form; and (iii) promote a neutral environment for the orderly governance of corporate affairs. Approvals are, in certain circumstances, required from the Nevada Gaming Commission before the registered corporation can make exceptional repurchases of voting securities above the current market price thereof and before a corporate acquisition opposed by management can be consummated. The Nevada Act also requires prior

26




approval of a plan of recapitalization proposed by the registered corporation’s Board of Directors in response to a tender offer made directly to the registered corporation’s stockholders for the purposes of acquiring control of the registered corporation.

Any person who is licensed, required to be licensed, registered, required to be registered, or is under common control with such persons, collectively licensees, and who proposes to become involved in a gaming venture outside of Nevada, is required to deposit with the Nevada Gaming Control Board, and thereafter maintain, a revolving fund in the amount of $10,000 to pay the expenses of investigation by the Nevada Gaming Control Board of their participation in such foreign gaming. The revolving fund is subject to increase or decrease at the discretion of the Nevada Gaming Commission. Thereafter, licensees are required to comply with certain reporting requirements imposed by the Nevada Act. A licensee is also subject to disciplinary action by the Nevada Gaming Commission if it knowingly violates any laws of the foreign jurisdiction pertaining to the foreign gaming operation, fails to conduct the foreign gaming operation in accordance with the standards of honesty and integrity required of Nevada gaming operations, engages in activities that are harmful to the state of Nevada or its ability to collect gaming taxes and fees, or employs a person in the foreign operation who has been denied a license or finding of suitability in Nevada on the ground of personal unsuitability.

Application of Additional or Future Regulatory Requirements

In the future, we intend to seek the necessary licenses, approvals and findings of suitability for us, our personnel and products in other jurisdictions throughout the world wherever significant sales are anticipated to be made. There can be no assurance, however, that such licenses, approvals or findings of suitability will be obtained or, if obtained, will not be conditioned, suspended or revoked or that we will be able to obtain the necessary approvals for any future products as they are developed. If a license, approval or a finding of suitability is required by a regulatory authority and we fail to obtain the necessary license, approval or finding, we may be prohibited from selling our products for use in the respective jurisdiction or may be required to sell our products through other licensed entities at a reduced profit.

Executive Officers of the Company

Our executive officers are elected each year at the annual meeting of the Board of Directors, which follows the annual meeting of stockholders, to hold office for a one-year term and until their successors have been elected and qualified or until their earlier death, resignation or removal.

Certain information regarding each of our executive officers is set forth below.

Name

 

 

 

Age

 

Position

 

A. Lorne Weil

 

 

60

 

 

Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer

 

Michael R. Chambrello

 

 

48

 

 

President and Chief Operating Officer

 

Martin E. Schloss

 

 

59

 

 

Senior Vice President and Secretary

 

DeWayne E. Laird

 

 

58

 

 

Vice President, Chief Financial Officer and Controller

 

Ira H. Raphaelson

 

 

52

 

 

Vice President and General Counsel

 

William J. Huntley

 

 

56

 

 

Vice President of Lottery Systems and President, SGI Systems

 

Cliff O. Bickell

 

 

63

 

 

Vice President of Printed Products and President, SGI Printed Products

 

Steven M. Saferin

 

 

57

 

 

Vice President of Ventures and President, SG Ventures

 

Robert C. Becker

 

 

47

 

 

Vice President and Treasurer

 

Sally L. Conkright

 

 

53

 

 

Vice President of Administration

 

 

A. Lorne Weil has been Chairman of the Board of Directors since October 1991 and Chief Executive Officer since April 1992. Mr. Weil also served as President of the Company from August 1997 to June 2005. Mr. Weil was President of Lorne Weil, Inc., a firm providing strategic planning and corporate

27




development services to high technology industries, from 1979 to November 1992. Previously, Mr. Weil was Vice President of Corporate Development at General Instrument Corporation, working with wagering and cable systems.

Michael R. Chambrello has served as President and Chief Operating Officer since July 2005. From November 2000 to June 2005, Mr. Chambrello was President and CEO of Environmental Systems Products Holdings, Inc. (“ESP”), which provides vehicle emissions testing systems and services to government agencies and prior to ESP he was CEO of Transmedia Asia Pacific, Inc. and Transmedia Europe Inc., which provide membership-based consumer and business services. Mr. Chambrello has approximately 20 years of lottery industry experience, having served as President of Gtech Corporation and Executive Vice President of Gtech Holdings Corporation.

Martin E. Schloss has served as Senior Vice President since February 2006 and is responsible for the Company’s mergers and acquisitions activity. Mr. Schloss has also served as Secretary since May 1995. Mr. Schloss previously served as the Company’s General Counsel for approximately 13 years. Prior to joining the Company, Mr. Schloss served in various positions in the legal department of General Instrument Corporation for approximately 15 years.

DeWayne E. Laird has served as Vice President and Chief Financial Officer since November 1998 and corporate controller since April 1996. From January 1992 to March 1996, Mr. Laird was President of Laird Associates, PC, a CPA firm providing financial consulting services to a variety of industries. From April 1984 to December 1991, he held various senior positions with Philadelphia Suburban Corporation, including Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer.

Ira H. Raphaelson has served as Vice President and General Counsel since February 2006. Mr. Raphaelson is the chief legal officer of the Company and, among other responsibilities, provides legal advice to the compliance function. Prior to joining the Company, Mr. Raphaelson was a partner in the Washington D.C. office of the law firm of O’Melveny & Myers LLP where he was a member of the firm’s global enforcement defense practice and litigator for 10 years. He is a nationally recognized author and lecturer on corporate governance and the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. He was also a litigator at Shaw Pittman LLP, served as Special Counsel for Financial Institutions, a position with respect to which he was appointed by the first President Bush and confirmed by the Senate in 1991, and he served as a state and federal prosecutor in Chicago for 13 years where he was also U.S. Attorney.

William J. Huntley has served as Vice President of Lottery Systems since October 2002 and as President of the Systems Division of Scientific Games International, Inc. since September 2000. He has also served as President of Scientific Games Racing, LLC since January 1, 2005. Previously, Mr. Huntley served as President of Autotote Lottery Corporation from November 1997 until its merger into Scientific Games International, Inc. following the Company’s acquisition of Scientific Games Holdings Corp. in September 2000. He served as Vice President of Autotote Systems, Inc. (now known as Scientific Games Racing, LLC) from June 1989 to November 1997 and as Vice President of Operations of the Company from 1991 to 1994.

Cliff O. Bickell has served as Vice President of Printed Products since October 2002 and as President of the Printed Products Division of Scientific Games International, Inc. since September 2000. Mr. Bickell previously served as Vice President, Treasurer and Chief Financial Officer for Scientific Games Holdings Corp. from 1995 until its acquisition by the Company in September 2000. Prior to joining Scientific Games, Mr. Bickell was Vice President, Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer of Paragon Trade Brands, a multi-national consumer products manufacturer. In addition, Mr. Bickell has held positions as Senior Vice President, Corporate Administration-Chief Financial Officer of W.A. Krueger Co., a commercial printing company, and Treasurer of Dataproducts Corporation, a multinational electronics manufacturer.

28




Steven M. Saferin has served as Vice President of Ventures since June 2005 and as President of the Ventures Division of Scientific Games International, Inc. since September 2003. Mr. Saferin has been with the Company since the acquisition of MDI Entertainment, Inc. in January 2003. Mr. Saferin founded MDI in 1986, an industry leader in licensed lottery games and promotions, where Mr. Saferin served as President and Chief Executive Officer. Prior to founding MDI, Mr. Saferin was the Director of Program Acquisitions at ESPN. In addition, Mr. Saferin held the positions of Vice President with Viacom Communications and Warner Amex Cable and was an Attorney-Advisor to the Cable Television Bureau of the Federal Communications Commission.

Robert C. Becker has served as Treasurer since October 1996 and as Vice President since April 2001. Prior to joining the Company, Mr. Becker served as Assistant Treasurer for the Fuller Company from 1990 to 1994.

Sally L. Conkright has served as Vice President of Administration since 2005 and is the chief human resources officer for the Company. Ms Conkright previously served as Vice President of Organizational Development for the Company. Prior to joining the Company in 2002, Ms. Conkright served as Director of Compensation and Benefits for Xerox Corporation from 1999 to 2000 and as Vice President of Human Resources and Public Relations for Xerox New Enterprises from 1997 to 1999.

Access to Public Filings

We file annual, quarterly, current reports, proxy statements and other documents with the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. The SEC maintains an internet website that contains reports, proxy and information statements, and other information regarding issuers, including us, that file electronically with the SEC. The public can obtain any documents that we file with the SEC at http://www.sec.gov.

We make the following information available free of charge through the Investor Relations link on our website at www.scientificgames.com:

·       Our annual reports on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K and amendments to those reports as soon as reasonably practicable after they are filed electronically with the SEC;

·       The Section 16 ownership reports filed by our officers, directors and 10% stockholders on Forms 3, 4 and 5 and amendments to those reports as soon as reasonably practicable after they are filed electronically with the SEC; and

·       Our code of business conduct and ethics, which applies to all of our officers, directors and employees.

Item 1A.                RISK FACTORS

You should carefully consider the following information with the other information contained or incorporated by reference in this annual report on Form 10-K.

We operate in highly competitive industries and our success depends on our ability to effectively compete with numerous domestic and foreign lottery and pari-mutuel businesses.

The instant ticket and online lottery businesses are highly competitive. We face competition from a number of domestic and foreign instant ticket manufacturers, online lottery system providers and other competitors, some of which have substantially greater financial resources than we do. We continue to operate in a period of intense price-based competition. The award of contracts by state officials is influenced by factors including price, the ability to optimize lottery revenues through game design,

29




technical capability, marketing capability and applications, the quality, dependability and upgrade capability of the network, production capacity, the security and integrity of a vendor’s production operations, the experience, financial condition and reputation of a vendor and the satisfaction of other requirements and qualifications that lottery authorities may impose. Contract awards by lottery authorities are sometimes challenged by unsuccessful bidders, which can result in protracted legal proceedings that can result in delayed implementation or cancellation of the award. Any future success of our lottery business will also depend, in part, on the success of the lottery industry in attracting and retaining players in the face of increased competition for these players’ entertainment dollars, as well as our own success in developing innovative products and systems to achieve this goal. Our failure to achieve this goal could reduce revenues from our lottery operations.

The market for pari-mutuel wagering services is also highly competitive. We compete primarily on the basis of the design, performance, reliability and pricing of our products, as well as customer service. Our pari-mutuel customers face significant competition from other operators in the pari-mutuel business, other gaming venues such as casinos and state-sponsored lotteries and other forms of legal and illegal gaming. The continuing popularity of horse racing is important to the operating results of our pari-mutuel business. Competition from sporting events and other forms of entertainment, and casinos, sports wagering services and other non-racetrack gaming operators, may reduce the attendance and amounts wagered at our customers’ horse racing events, which could reduce our revenues.

While we have exclusive licenses for our OTB operations in the Netherlands and, subject to our compliance with certain licensing requirements, the right to operate in perpetuity substantially all off-track pari-mutuel wagering in Connecticut, our revenues may be adversely affected by competition for the consumer’s wagering and entertainment dollar. Our venue management business competes with other pari-mutuel operations as well as other forms of gaming and other entertainment. Competition for wagers comes from casinos, racetracks, lotteries and other forms of legal and illegal gambling. Other gaming competitors operate in our licensed markets and in surrounding areas and compete for our customers, and additional competitors could be licensed, or existing regulations could be changed, so as to divert wagering activity from our OTB operations.

The market for prepaid phone cards is highly fragmented. Competition comes from other instant lottery ticket printers utilizing similar lottery security and printing technologies, as well as alternative printing and non-printing technologies. Our telecommunications products operations compete with other printing companies on the basis of price, availability, product features and product security. There is competition within our class of products and other technologies to provide the desired functionality. There are alternative technologies, such as smart cards, with which our products compete. Moreover, the cellular telephone industry is undergoing significant growth and rapid technology changes such that other technologies, including electronic commerce, could impact our growth opportunities and our customer relationships. Further, increasing price competition in the prepaid phone card business may continue to negatively affect our operating margins.

Our business is subject to evolving technology.

The markets for all of our products and services are affected by changing technology, new legislation and evolving industry standards. Our ability to anticipate or respond to such changes and to develop and introduce new and enhanced products and services on a timely basis will be a significant factor in our ability to expand, remain competitive, attract new customers and retain existing contracts.

We can give you no assurance that we will achieve the necessary technological advances, have the financial resources, introduce new products or services on a timely basis or otherwise have the ability to compete effectively in the markets we serve.

30




We are heavily dependent on our ability to renew our long-term contracts with our customers in the lottery and pari-mutuel businesses, and we could lose substantial revenue if we are unable to renew certain of our contracts.

Generally, our lottery contracts are for initial terms of one to seven years, with optional renewal periods. Upon the expiration of a lottery contract, including any extensions thereof, lottery authorities may award new contracts through a competitive bidding process. Contracts representing a substantial majority of our annual revenues from lottery contracts are scheduled to expire or reach optional extension dates during the next three years.

Our lottery contracts typically permit a lottery authority to terminate the contract at any time for material failure to perform, other specified reasons and, in many cases, for no reason at all, without penalty. In addition, lottery contracts to which we are a party frequently contain exacting implementation schedules and performance requirements. Failure to meet these schedules and requirements may result in substantial monetary liquidated damages, as well as possible contract termination. We are also required by certain of our lottery customers to provide surety, or performance, bonds. We cannot assure you that we will continue to be able to obtain performance bonds on commercially reasonable terms or at all. Our inability to provide such bonds would materially and adversely affect our ability to renew existing, or obtain new, lottery contracts.

Our contracts for the provision of pari-mutuel wagering services are typically for initial terms of five years. Contracts accounting for a majority of our current annual pari-mutuel revenues are scheduled to expire during the next three years.

There can be no assurance that our current lottery or pari-mutuel contracts will be extended or that we will be awarded new lottery or pari-mutuel contracts as a result of competitive bidding processes in the future. The termination, expiration or failure to renew one or more of our contracts could cause us to lose substantial revenue.

Our ability to bid on new online lottery and pari-mutuel contracts is dependent upon our ability to fund required up-front capital expenditures through our cash from operations or through financings.

Our online lottery and pari-mutuel contracts generally require significant up-front capital expenditures for terminal assembly, software customization and implementation, systems and equipment installation and telecommunications configuration. Historically we have funded these up-front costs through cash flows generated from operations, available cash on hand and borrowings under our credit facilities. Our ability to continue to procure new contracts will depend on, among other things, our then present liquidity levels or our ability to obtain additional financing at commercially acceptable terms to finance the initial up-front costs. If we do not have adequate liquidity or are unable to obtain financing for these up-front costs on favorable terms or at all, we may not be able to bid on certain contracts, which could restrict our ability to grow and have a material adverse effect on our future profitability.

Our business depends on the protection of our intellectual property and proprietary information.

We believe that our success depends, in part, on protecting our intellectual property in the United States and in foreign countries. Our intellectual property includes certain patents and trademarks relating to our instant ticket games and wagering systems, as well as proprietary or confidential information that is not subject to patent or similar protection. Our intellectual property protects the integrity of our games, systems, products and services, which is a core value of the industries in which we operate. For example, our intellectual property is designed to ensure the security of the printing of our instant lottery tickets and prepaid phone cards and provide simple and secure validation of our lottery tickets. Competitors may independently develop similar or superior products, software, systems or business models. In cases where

31




our intellectual property is not protected by an enforceable patent, such independent development may result in a significant diminution in the value of our intellectual property.

We cannot assure you that we will be able to protect our intellectual property. We enter into confidentiality or license agreements with our employees, vendors, consultants, and, to the extent legally permissible, our customers, and generally control access to, and the distribution of, our game designs, systems and other software documentation and other proprietary information, as well as the designs, systems and other software documentation and other information we license from others. Despite our efforts to protect these proprietary rights, unauthorized parties may try to copy our gaming products, business models or systems, use certain of our confidential information to develop competing products, or develop independently or otherwise obtain and use our gaming products or technology, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our business. Policing unauthorized use of our technology is difficult and expensive, particularly because of the global nature of our operations. The laws of other countries may not adequately protect our intellectual property.

We cannot assure you that our business activities, games, products and systems will not infringe upon the proprietary rights of others, or that other parties will not assert infringement claims against us. Any such claim and any resulting litigation, should it occur, could subject us to significant liability for damages and could result in invalidation of our proprietary rights, distract management, and/or require us to enter into costly and burdensome royalty and licensing agreements. Such royalty and licensing agreements, if required, may not be available on terms acceptable to us, or may not be available at all. In the future, we may also need to file lawsuits to defend the validity of our intellectual property rights and trade secrets, or to determine the validity and scope of the proprietary rights of others. Such litigation, whether successful or unsuccessful, could result in substantial costs and diversion of resources.

We rely on products and technologies that we license from third parties. We cannot assure you that these third-party licenses, or the support for such licenses, will continue to be available to us on commercially reasonable terms.

Our business competes on the basis of the security of our systems and products.

We believe that our success depends, in part, on providing secure products and systems to our vendors and customers. Attempts to penetrate security measures may come from various combinations of customers, retailers, vendors, employees and others. We constantly assess the adequacy of our security systems to protect against any material loss to any of our customers.

In our lottery business, we employ numerous security safeguards, including bar coding and providing additional layers of protection in our instant tickets. We also incorporate this security technology in our prepaid phone cards. We have effected security measures in the areas of ticket specifications, production, packaging, delivery, distribution and accounting. We also incorporate computer function safeguards, including secure ticket data, control number encryption, winner file data, and ticket stock control, in our data processing and in the computer operations phase. In addition, we also retain a major independent registered public accounting firm to perform agreed upon security procedures for each game produced before it is sent to the customer.

As the incidence and severity of publicly reported cases of physical and computer crime continue, major lotteries periodically reassess key security questions concerning the vulnerability of lottery games. Although we have not uncovered any practical, economically feasible way to breach the security of our instant tickets or online lottery games that could result in a material loss to any of our customers, we cannot assure you that security breaches will not occur.

32




In our pari-mutuel business, we and the other pari-mutuel industry totalizator companies agreed to industry-wide security improvements, including the installation of software necessary to scan all wagering pools in connection with multi-race wagers after each race of a multi-race wager. We also engaged Kroll Inc., a leading worldwide risk mitigation and security company, to conduct a separate review of our physical security, operational controls, hiring practices and internal compliance. Kroll made recommendations to further enhance our security and we have implemented those recommendations. In addition, we have begun the deployment of a new control system to operate every one of our totalizator systems. This independent system runs in parallel with our computers, records data in real time and allows for a review by a third party of all data against the live system.

Although we believe that the foregoing actions will provide sufficient security for our wagering systems, there can be no assurance that our business might not be affected by a security breach. Any such security breach could have a material adverse impact on our business.

The lottery and pari-mutuel industries are subject to strict government regulations that may limit our existing operations and have a negative impact on our ability to grow.

In the United States and many other countries, lotteries, pari-mutuel wagering and other forms of wagering must be expressly authorized by law. Once authorized, such activities are subject to extensive and evolving governmental regulation. Moreover, such gaming regulatory requirements vary from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. Therefore, we are subject to a wide range of complex gaming laws and regulations in the jurisdictions in which we are licensed. Most jurisdictions require that we be licensed, that our key personnel and certain of our security holders be found suitable or be licensed, and that our products be reviewed and approved before placement. If a license, approval or finding of suitability is required by a regulatory authority and we fail to seek or do not receive the necessary approval, license or finding of suitability, then we may be prohibited from distributing our products for use in the respective jurisdiction. Furthermore, most jurisdictions have ongoing reporting requirements for certain transactions and are concerned with our accounting practices, internal controls, business relationships, and the fair operation of our products.

The regulatory environment in any particular jurisdiction may change in the future, and any such change could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations. Moreover, we can give you no assurance that the operation of lotteries, pari-mutuel wagering facilities, video gaming industry machines, Internet gaming or other forms of lottery or wagering systems will be approved by additional jurisdictions or that those jurisdictions in which these lottery and wagering activities are currently permitted will continue to permit such activities.

We are required to obtain and maintain licenses from various state and local jurisdictions in order to operate certain aspects of our pari-mutuel business and we are subject to extensive background investigations and suitability standards in our lottery business. We also will become subject to regulation in any other jurisdiction where our customers operate in the future. There can be no assurance that we will be able to obtain new licenses or renew any of our licenses, and the loss, denial or non-renewal of any of our licenses could have a material adverse effect on our business. Lottery authorities generally conduct background investigations of the winning vendor and its employees prior to and after the award of a lottery contract. Generally, regulatory authorities have broad discretion when granting, renewing or revoking these approvals and licenses. Lottery authorities with which we do business may require the removal of any of our employees deemed to be unsuitable and are generally empowered to disqualify us from receiving a lottery contract or operating a lottery system as a result of any such investigation. Our failure, or the failure of any of our key personnel, systems or machines, in obtaining or retaining a required license or approval in one jurisdiction could negatively impact our ability (or the ability of any of our key personnel, systems or gaming machines) to obtain or retain required licenses and approvals in other jurisdictions. The failure to obtain or retain a required license or approval in any jurisdiction would decrease the geographic areas

33




where we may operate and generate revenues, decrease our share in the gaming marketplace and put us at a disadvantage compared with our competitors.

Some jurisdictions also require extensive personal and financial disclosure and background checks from persons and entities beneficially owning a specified percentage (typically 5% or more) of our equity securities. The failure of these beneficial owners to submit to such background checks and provide required disclosure could jeopardize the award of a lottery contract to us or provide grounds for termination of an existing lottery contract. These licensing procedures and background investigations also may inhibit potential investors from becoming significant shareholders. Additional restrictions are often imposed by international jurisdictions in which we market our lottery systems on foreign corporations, such as us, seeking to do business in such jurisdictions. Similar restrictions and considerations are also applicable to our pari-mutuel business.

There also have been and may continue to be investigations of various types conducted by governmental authorities into possible improprieties and wrong-doing in connection with efforts to obtain and/or the awarding of lottery contracts and related matters. In early November 2005, we were advised that the North Carolina Secretary of State had referred to the North Carolina Attorney General for investigation alleged misdemeanor violations of the North Carolina Lobbying Act by one of our subsidiaries and one of its now former employees for alleged failure to timely register as a lobbyist. We are cooperating with the investigation and while no assurance can be given, we believe that the inquiry will conclude that we did not engage in any wrongdoing. Because our reputation for integrity is an important factor in our business dealings with lottery and other governmental agencies, a governmental allegation or a finding of improper conduct on our part or attributable to us in any manner could have a material adverse effect on our business, including our ability to retain existing contracts or to obtain new or renewal contracts. In addition, any adverse publicity resulting from such an investigation could have a material adverse effect on our reputation and business.

Currently, account wagering operations, through which pari-mutuel customers place wagers by phone or via the Internet on thoroughbred, harness or greyhound racing, may be conducted only from certain jurisdictions and only through licensed wagering operators in certain jurisdictions. While we believe that the activities of our pari-mutuel businesses comply with all applicable laws, law enforcement authorities in certain jurisdictions have opposed the expansion of wagering via telephone and the Internet and state regulators have expressed concerns to us regarding such wagering by their citizens through our account wagering systems and the racetracks serviced by our pari-mutuel wagering systems. We cannot assure you that our activities or the activities of our customers will not become the subject of law enforcement proceedings or that any such proceedings would not have a material adverse impact on us or our business plans.

We have developed and implemented an internal compliance program in an effort to ensure that we comply with legal requirements imposed in connection with our wagering-related activities, as well as legal requirements generally applicable to all publicly traded corporations. The compliance program is run on a day-to-day basis with two full-time compliance officers and is overseen by the Compliance Committee authorized by our board of directors. While we are firmly committed to full compliance with all applicable laws, there can be no assurance that such steps will prevent the violation of one or more laws or regulations, or that a violation by us or an employee will not result in the imposition of a monetary fine or suspension or revocation of one or more of our licenses.

Gaming opponents persist in their efforts to curtail the expansion of legalized gaming, which, if successful, could limit our existing operations.

Legalized gaming is subject to opposition from gaming opponents. We can give you no assurance that this opposition will not succeed in preventing the legalization of gaming in jurisdictions where these

34




activities are presently prohibited or prohibiting or limiting the expansion of gaming where it is currently permitted, in either case to the detriment of our business, financial condition, results and prospects.

Our ability to complete future acquisitions of gaming and related businesses successfully could limit our future growth.

Part of our corporate strategy is to continue to pursue expansion and acquisition opportunities in gaming and related businesses, such as EssNet AB or The Global Draw LTD, and we could face significant challenges in managing and integrating the expanded or combined operations including acquired assets, operations and personnel. We cannot assure you that acquisition opportunities will be available on acceptable terms or at all or that we will be able to obtain necessary financing or regulatory approvals to complete such potential acquisitions. Our ability to succeed in implementing our strategy will depend to some degree upon the ability of our management to identify, complete and successfully integrate commercially viable acquisitions. Acquisition transactions may disrupt our ongoing business and distract management from other responsibilities. Any future acquisition transactions involving the use of company stock have the potential of dilution to our existing shareholders and earnings per share.

Our revenues fluctuate due to seasonal, weather and other variations and you should not rely upon our periodic operating results as indications of future performance.

Our pari-mutuel service revenues are subject to seasonal and weather variations. The first and fourth quarters of the calendar year traditionally comprise the weakest period for our pari-mutuel wagering service revenue. As a result of inclement weather during the winter months, a number of racetracks do not operate and those that do operate often experience missed racing days. This adversely affects the amounts wagered and our corresponding service revenues. Wagering equipment sales and software license revenues usually reflect a limited number of large transactions, which may not recur on an annual basis. Consequently, revenues and operating results can vary substantially from period to period as a result of the timing of revenue recognition for major equipment sales and software license revenue. In addition, instant ticket and prepaid phone card sales may vary depending on the season and timing of contract awards, changes in customer budgets, ticket inventory levels, lottery retail sales and general economic conditions.

We are dependent on suppliers and contract manufacturers, and any failure of these parties to meet our performance and quality standards or requirements could cause us to incur additional costs or lose customers.

Our production of instant lottery tickets and prepaid phone cards, in particular, depends upon a continuous supply of raw materials, supplies, power and natural resources. Our operating results could be adversely affected by an interruption or cessation in the supply of these items.

We simulcast live racing events by transmitting audio and/or video signals from one facility to a satellite for reception by wagering locations across the country. Our access to satellite service is provided pursuant to long-term contracts. The technical failure of the satellite through which we transmit substantially all of our racing events would require us to obtain other satellite access. We have no assurance of access to such other satellites, or, if available, whether the use of such other satellites could be obtained on favorable terms or in a timely manner. While satellite failures are infrequent, the operation of the satellite is outside of our control.

35




We have foreign operations, which subjects us to additional risks.

Our business in foreign markets subjects us to risks customarily associated with such operations, including:

·       foreign withholding taxes on our subsidiaries’ earnings that could reduce cash flow available to meet our required debt service and our other obligations;

·       the complexity of foreign laws, regulations and markets;

·       the impact of foreign labor laws and disputes;

·       other economic, tax and regulatory policies of local governments; and

·       the ability to attract and retain key personnel in foreign jurisdictions.

Our consolidated financial results are significantly affected by foreign currency exchange rate fluctuations. Foreign currency exchange rate exposures arise from current transactions and anticipated transactions denominated in currencies other than U.S. dollars and from the translation of foreign currency balance sheet accounts into U.S. dollar-denominated balance sheet accounts. We are exposed to currency exchange rate fluctuations because a significant portion of our revenues is denominated in currencies other than the U.S. dollar, particularly the British pound sterling and the Euro. Exchange rate fluctuations have in the past adversely affected our operating results and cash flows and may continue to adversely affect our results of operations and cash flows and the value of our assets outside the United States.

We cannot assure you that we will be able to operate successfully in any foreign market.

Certain holders of our common stock exert significant influence over the Company and make decisions with which other stockholders may disagree.

In August 2004, MacAndrews & Forbes Holdings Inc. was issued approximately 25% of our outstanding common stock in connection with its conversion of our then outstanding Series A Convertible Preferred Stock. Such holder is entitled to appoint up to four of the ten members of our board of directors under a stockholders’ agreement with us, as supplemented, which we originally entered into with holders of the Series A Convertible Preferred Stock, and certain actions of the Company require the approval of such holder. As a result, this holder has the ability to exert significant influence over our business and may make decisions with which other stockholders may disagree, including, among other things, to delay, discourage or prevent a change of control of the Company or a potential merger, consolidation, tender offer, takeover or other business combination.

If certain of our key personnel leave us, our business will be significantly adversely affected.

We depend on the continued performance of A. Lorne Weil, our Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, and the members of our senior management team. Mr. Weil has extensive experience in the lottery and pari-mutuel businesses and has contributed significantly to the growth of our business. If we lose the services of Mr. Weil or any of our other senior officers and cannot find suitable replacements for such persons in a timely manner, it could have a material adverse effect on our business.

We could incur costs in the event of violations of or liabilities under environmental laws.

Our operations and real properties are subject to U.S. and foreign environmental laws and regulations, including those relating to air emissions, the management and disposal of hazardous substances and wastes, and the cleanup of contaminated sites. We could incur costs, including cleanup costs, fines or penalties, and third-party claims as a result of violations of or liabilities under environmental

36




laws. Some of our operations require environmental permits and controls to prevent or reduce environmental pollution, and these permits are subject to review, renewal and modification by issuing authorities. We believe that our operations are currently in substantial compliance with all environmental laws, regulations and permits and have not historically incurred material costs for noncompliance with, or liabilities under, these requirements.

Failure to perform under our lottery contracts may result in substantial monetary liquidated damages, as well as contract termination.

Our business subjects us to certain risks of litigation, including potential allegations that we have not fully performed under our contracts or that goods or services we supply are defective in some respect. Litigation is pending in Colombia arising out of the termination of certain Colombian lottery contracts in 1993. An agency of the Colombian government has asserted claims against certain parties, including our subsidiary Scientific Games International, Inc., or SGI, which owned a minority interest in the former operator of the Colombian national lottery. The claims are for, among other things, contract penalties, interest and the costs of a bond issued by a Colombian surety. SGI has been advised by Colombian counsel that it has various defenses on the merits as well as procedural defenses. See “Legal Proceedings” for additional information regarding this litigation. Although we believe that any potential losses arising from this litigation will not result in a material adverse effect on our consolidated financial position or results of operations, we cannot predict the final outcome, and there can be no assurance that this litigation might not be finally resolved adversely to us or result in material liability.

Failure to maintain an effective system of internal controls over financial reporting, we may not be able to accurately report our financial results, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and the market value of our securities.

Effective internal controls over financial reporting are necessary for us to provide reliable financial reports. If we cannot provide reliable financial reports, our reputation and operating results may be harmed. We identified that a material weakness in the design of internal controls over financial reporting existed at December 31, 2004 because we had insufficient personnel resources and technical accounting expertise within the accounting function to resolve certain non-routine or complex accounting matters, such as the treatment of our 20% minority equity interest in an Italian consortium.

In 2004, we had incorrectly accounted for our interest in that Italian consortium (which was formed in 2003 and began operations in mid- 2004). An adjustment for this matter along with certain other adjustments related to non-routine or complex accounting matters, which in the aggregate were material to the financial statements, were necessary to fairly present the financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2004 in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States. This deficiency was identified during the year end audit process and represented a material weakness in the design of our internal controls.

We have since remediated this weakness. We changed the design of internal controls over non-routine and complex accounting matters through the re-assignment of responsibilities for certain accounting personnel, and the formation of a committee which is now responsible for reviewing all non-routine and complex accounting matters and preparing formal reports on their conclusions. We also added additional accounting personnel during 2005 and are continuing to evaluate additional controls and procedures which we can implement. The cost of this remediation effort was not material to our financial statements.

We cannot be certain that these measures, and any other steps we may take, will ensure that we implement and maintain adequate controls over our financial processes and reporting in the future. Any failure to implement required new or improved controls, or difficulties encountered in their implementation, could harm our operations or results or cause us to not to meet our reporting obligations.

37




or materially and adversely impact our business, our financial condition and the market value of our securities.

Labor disputes may have an adverse effect on our pari-mutuel operations.

As of December 31, 2005, we had approximately 340 union employees in our pari-mutuel operations. We collectively bargain with the labor unions that represent these employees. The current collective bargaining agreement representing approximately 85% of our union employees expires October 20, 2009. Another collective bargaining agreement relating to our Canadian racing operations is currently under negotiations, having expired October 20, 2005. Failure to reach an agreement with any of the unions could result in strike or labor actions that could disrupt our and our customers operations. If we were to experience a strike or work stoppage, it would be difficult to find sufficient replacement employees with the proper skills. We cannot assure that we will reach a collective bargaining agreement or that we will not encounter any conflicts or strikes with the labor union. A labor dispute could have an adverse effect on our business or results of operations, could cause us to lose customers or could cause our customers’ operations to be affected and might have permanent effects on our business.

We have a significant amount of indebtedness and failure to generate sufficient cash as our debt comes due or to renew credit lines prior to expiration may adversely affect our business.

As of December 31, 2005, we had approximately $580 million of debt outstanding, consisting of convertible senior subordinated debentures, senior subordinated notes and a senior secured credit facility. We expect that existing cash, cash equivalents, short term investments, cash provided from operations and our bank credit facilities will be sufficient to meet ongoing cash requirements. However, failure to generate adequate cash as our debt becomes due or to renew credit lines prior to their expiration may adversely affect our business.

The price of our common stock may be volatile.

Our stock price may fluctuate in response to a number of events and factors, such as, variations in operating results, actions by various regulatory agencies, litigation, market perceptions of our financial reporting, financial estimates and recommendation by securities analysts, rating agency reports, performance of other companies that investors or security analysts deem comparable to us, news reports relating to our business, our markets or general market conditions.

ITEM 1B.       UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

No disclosure required pursuant to this Item.

38




ITEM 2.                PROPERTIES

The following is a list of facilities that we use in the operation of our business.

Business

 

 

 

Location

 

Square Feet

 

Owned/leased

 

Purposes

 

Corporate

 

New York, NY

 

 

21,700

 

 

 

Leased

 

 

Corporate Headquarters

 

 

 

Newark, DE

 

 

8,159

 

 

 

Leased

 

 

Administration

 

Pari-Mutuel

 

Essen, Germany

 

 

15,236

 

 

 

Leased

 

 

Administration and operations

 

 

 

Alpharetta, GA

 

 

44,800

 

 

 

Leased

 

 

Warehouse and office space

 

 

 

Ballymahon, Ireland

 

 

14,500

 

 

 

Leased

 

 

Manufacturing and warehouse

 

 

 

Various cities, Germany

 

 

9,063

 

 

 

Leased

 

 

Warehouse and office space

 

Venue Management

 

Various cities, CT

 

 

54,242

 

 

 

Leased

 

 

OTB facilities

 

 

 

New Haven, CT

 

 

1,667

 

 

 

Leased

 

 

Administration

 

 

 

Windsor Locks, CT

 

 

39,000

 

 

 

Owned

 

 

OTB facility

 

 

 

New Haven, CT

 

 

55,000

 

 

 

Owned

 

 

OTB facility, administration
and operations

 

 

 

Waterville, ME

 

 

30,098

 

 

 

Owned

 

 

OTB facility

 

 

 

Den Haag, Netherlands

 

 

5,000

 

 

 

Leased

 

 

Administration and operations

 

 

 

Various cities,
The Netherlands

 

 

34,000

 

 

 

Leased

 

 

OTB facilities

 

Lottery

 

Rocky Hill, CT

 

 

17,350

 

 

 

Leased

 

 

Administration and operations

 

 

 

Barre, VT

 

 

3,100

 

 

 

Leased

 

 

Administration

 

 

 

Concord, NH

 

 

5,400

 

 

 

Leased

 

 

Administration and operations

 

 

 

Helena, MT

 

 

3,900

 

 

 

Leased

 

 

Administration and operations

 

 

 

Urbandale, IA

 

 

7,314

 

 

 

Leased

 

 

Administration and operations

 

 

 

Gardner, ME

 

 

10,000

 

 

 

Leased

 

 

Administration and operations

 

 

 

Orlando, FL

 

 

50,018

 

 

 

Leased

 

 

Administration and operations

 

 

 

Blythewood, SC

 

 

20,000

 

 

 

Leased

 

 

Administration and operations

 

 

 

Vienna, Austria

 

 

47,362

 

 

 

Leased

 

 

Administration and operations

 

 

 

Various U.S. Cities

 

 

52,139

 

 

 

Leased

 

 

Warehouse space and operations

 

 

 

Santiago, Chile

 

 

75,854

 

 

 

Leased

 

 

Administration, operations,
warehousing and manufacturing

 

 

 

Bielefild,Germany
(Honsel)

 

 

177,067

 

 

 

Owned

 

 

Administration, operations,
warehousing and manufacturing

 

 

 

Santa Catarina, Mexico

 

 

33,465

 

 

 

Leased

 

 

Warehouse space

 

 

 

Barcelona, Spain

 

 

16,146

 

 

 

Leased

 

 

Administration and operations

 

 

 

Alpharetta, GA

 

 

350,035

 

 

 

Owned

 

 

Manufacturing and administration

 

 

 

Duluth, GA

 

 

48,283

 

 

 

Leased

 

 

Warehouse space

 

 

 

Phoenix, AZ

 

 

22,688

 

 

 

Leased

 

 

Administration and warehouse

 

 

 

La Vergne, TN

 

 

23,600

 

 

 

Leased

 

 

Administration and warehouse

 

 

 

Baltimore, MD

 

 

27,600

 

 

 

Leased

 

 

Administration and operations

 

 

 

Harrisburg, PA

 

 

24,700

 

 

 

Leased

 

 

Administration and operations

 

 

 

Harrisburg, PA

 

 

20,000

 

 

 

Leased

 

 

Warehouse space

 

 

 

Dover, DE

 

 

23,650

 

 

 

Leased

 

 

Administration and operations

 

 

 

Twinsburg, OH

 

 

41,066

 

 

 

Leased

 

 

Administration and operations

 

 

 

Indianapolis, IN

 

 

20,000

 

 

 

Leased

 

 

Administration and operations

 

 

 

Oklahoma City, OK

 

 

32,513

 

 

 

Leased

 

 

Administration and operations

 

 

 

Sharon Hills, PA

 

 

12,000

 

 

 

Leased

 

 

Operations

 

 

 

Hato Rey, PR

 

 

34,717

 

 

 

Leased

 

 

Administration and operations

 

 

 

Various cities, FL

 

 

21,417

 

 

 

Leased

 

 

Administration and operations

 

Telecommunication Products

 

Leeds, England

 

 

150,000

 

 

 

Owned

 

 

Manufacturing

 

 

39




ITEM 3.                LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

Although we are a party to various claims and legal actions arising in the ordinary course of business, we believe, on the basis of information presently available to us, that the ultimate disposition of these matters will not likely have a material adverse effect on our consolidated financial position or results of operations.

Our subsidiary, Scientific Games International, Inc. (“SGI”), owned a minority interest in Wintech de Colombia S.A., or Wintech (now liquidated), which formerly operated the Colombian national lottery under contract with Empresa Colombiana de Recursos para la Salud, S.A. (“Ecosalud”), an agency of the Colombian government. The contract projected that certain levels of lottery ticket sales would be attained and provided a penalty against Wintech, SGI and the other shareholders of Wintech of up to $5.0 million if such performance levels were not achieved. In addition, with respect to a further guarantee of performance under the contract with Ecosalud, SGI delivered to Ecosalud a $4.0 million bond issued by a Colombian surety, Seguros del Estado (“Seguros”). Wintech started the instant lottery in Colombia, but, due to difficulties beyond its control, including, among other factors, social and political unrest in Colombia, frequently interrupted telephone service and power outages, and competition from another lottery being operated in a province of Colombia which we believe was in violation of Wintech’s exclusive license from Ecosalud, the projected sales level was not met for the year ended June 30, 1993. On July 1, 1993, Ecosalud adopted resolutions declaring, among other things, that the contract was in default and asserted various claims for compensation and penalties against Wintech, SGI and other shareholders of Wintech. Litigation is pending and/or threatened in Colombia concerning various claims among Ecosalud, Wintech and SGI, relating to the termination of the contracts with Ecosalud. Ecosalud’s claims are for, among other things, realization of the full amount of the penalty, plus interest and costs of the bond. In 2002 the Colombian Government enacted new gaming and lottery legislation which included the dissolution of Ecosalud. A new company, Empresa Territorial para la Salud (“Etesa”), was incorporated replacing Ecosalud. Etesa is the legal successor to Ecosalud with respect to the pending litigation.

The Colombian surety, Seguros, paid $2.4 million to Ecosalud under its $4.0 million bond, and made demand upon SGI for that amount under the indemnity agreement between the surety and SGI. SGI declined to make or authorize any such payment and notified the surety that any payment in response to Ecosalud’s demand on the bond was at the surety’s risk. In a case brought in U.S. District Court for the Northern District of  Georgia, the Colombian surety sought to recover from SGI sums paid (in SGI’s view, improperly) under its surety bond, plus interest. In September 1999, the District Court granted summary judgment for the surety in the amount of approximately $7 million (which included pre-judgment interest at a rate of 38.76% per annum). On appeal, the United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit, on August 20, 2001, affirmed the judgment for the principal amount of $2.4 million, but vacated that part of the judgment awarding approximately $4.6 million based on a pre-judgment interest rate of 38.76% with instructions to the District Court to recalculate pre-judgment interest. On February 22, 2002, SGI agreed to settle this matter upon payment of $3.7 million to the Colombian surety. On February 26, 2002, SGI drew upon a $1.5 million letter of credit posted by a former Colombian partner in order to partially fund this payment. This settlement resolves the U.S. litigation with the surety, but the claims in Colombia remain unresolved.

On June 4, 1999, Ecosalud filed a collection proceeding against SGI before the Third Section of the Tribunal Contencioso of Cundinamarca in Colombia, which served notice on SGI in May 2002. In July 2002, the Tribunal Contencioso of Cundinamarca denied SGI’s preliminary motion to dismiss the lawsuit and the decision was upheld by the Council of State, the highest appellate court with jurisdiction over this matter, in August 2003, of which SGI received notice in January 2004. As a result of these decisions, this lawsuit, which is in its early stages, will be heard in due course on its merits by the Tribunal Contencioso of Cundinamarca. Likewise, an appeal stage will be available before the Council of State of Colombia.

40




SGI has various defenses on the merits as well as procedural defenses, which were timely filed against Ecosalud’s claims. We intend to vigorously pursue these defenses as appropriate. On August 31, 2005, the procedural defense motion filed against this lawsuit was denied by the Tribunal Contencioso of Cundinamarca, while the appeal motion before the Council of State remains pending. Following final decision of the procedural motions, defenses on the merits will be heard. SGI also has certain cross indemnities and undertakings from the two other privately held shareholders of Wintech for their respective shares of any liability to Ecosalud. No assurance can be given that the other shareholders of Wintech will, or have sufficient assets to, honor their indemnity undertakings to SGI when the claims by Ecosalud against SGI and Wintech are finally resolved, in the event such claims result in any final liability. Although we believe that any potential losses arising from these claims will not result in a material adverse effect on our consolidated financial position or results of operations, it is not feasible to predict the final outcome, and there can be no assurance that these claims might not be finally resolved adversely to us or result in material liability.

On March 4, 2004, Gtech Corporation filed a lawsuit against us and several of our subsidiaries, Scientific Games International, Inc., Scientific Games Holdings Corporation,  and Scientific Games Finance Corporation, in the U.S. District Court for the District of Delaware. The lawsuit alleges that we have infringed upon two patents owned by Gtech concerning instant lottery ticket vending and dispensing machines and methods. A judgment of non-infringement was entered in our favor by the court on March 8, 2006. Gtech indicated that it intends to appeal, this judgment. If such consent order is entered and such an appeal is filed, we expect to vigorously contest the matter.

On May 9, 2005, our subsidiary, Scientific Games Royalty Corporation, filed suit against Gtech Corporation in U.S. District Court for the District of Delaware alleging patent infringement of our group participation multiplier patents, U.S. Patent Nos. 6,648,753 and 6,692,354. These patents apply to online lottery games that have an optional bonus wager as a feature of the game. In the event that a player wins a prize in the base game and has chosen to make the bonus wager, all of the player’s prizes in the base game, with the exception of the jackpot amount, may be multiplied by a randomly selected multiplier.  We believe that Gtech Corporation currently provides such games that infringe on our applicable patents in various jurisdictions in the United States. The lawsuit seeks damages and other relief for such infringement. Discovery is pending.

On December 30, 2004, Gtech Corporation and Gtech Holdings Corporation filed a complaint against us and others in a state court in Texas (Travis County, Texas, 98th Judicial District) alleging among other things dissemination of false and defamatory statements concerning Gtech and its business in Mexico and elsewhere, and that we were disqualified from Mexican bid procurements for online lottery services. We were served with the complaint in this matter on or about April 6, 2005, and the suit is in the early stages of discovery. We believe the claims in this suit lack merit and will contest them vigorously.

In early November 2005, we were advised that the North Carolina Secretary of State referred to the North Carolina Attorney General for investigation alleged misdemeanor violations of the North Carolina Lobbying Act by our subsidiary Scientific Games International, Inc. and one of its now former employees for alleged failure to timely register as a lobbyist. We are cooperating with the investigation and, while no assurance can be given, we believe that the inquiry will conclude that we did not engage in any wrongdoing.

On November 27, 2002, our subsidiary, Scientific Games International, Inc., filed a lawsuit against Oberthur Gaming Technologies Corp. in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Georgia seeking a declaratory judgment that the defendant’s U.S. Patent Nos. 5,704,647 and 5,803,504, are invalid and unenforceable. The patents apply to “Multi-Color Overprinting of Scratch-Off Lottery Tickets” using “screened half tone images” of two, four, six or seven different colors, are invalid and unenforceable. The defendant filed a counterclaim seeking damages and injunctive relief for the Company’s alleged infringement of certain of the claims of these patents. Following a hearing by the court on claim

41




construction, the court issued a ruling on December 5, 2005 with respect to the scope of the patent claims asserted by the defendant against us. The court’s ruling served to broaden the scope of relevant prior art in the matter. Although we believe that the prior art possessed by the Company should invalidate the patents asserted against us, there can be no assurance that the court will accept our position. Failure to invalidate the patents could have a material effect on our ability to utilize the claimed technology, including four-color process overprinting, absent a license agreement from the defendant.  Discovery in support of a planned motion for summary judgment is pending.

ITEM 4.                SUBMISSION OF MATTERS TO A VOTE OF SECURITY HOLDERS

No matters were submitted to a vote of our security holders during the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2005.

PART II

ITEM 5.                MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

Our outstanding common stock has been listed for trading on the Nasdaq National Market under the symbol “SGMS”. The following table sets forth, for the periods indicated, the range of high and low closing prices of our Class A common stock.

 

 

Market Price of
Scientific Games
Common Stock

 

 

 

High

 

Low

 

Fiscal 2004 (January 1, 2004-December 31, 2004)

 

 

 

 

 

First Quarter

 

19.04

 

14.98

 

Second Quarter

 

21.48

 

17.15

 

Third Quarter

 

19.66

 

16.01

 

Fourth Quarter

 

24.55

 

18.66

 

Fiscal 2005 (January 1, 2005-December 31, 2005)

 

 

 

 

 

First Quarter

 

26.48

 

21.72

 

Second Quarter

 

27.49

 

21.34

 

Third Quarter

 

31.54

 

27.00

 

Fourth Quarter

 

31.38

 

26.51

 

Fiscal 2006

 

 

 

 

 

First Quarter through March 15, 2006

 

33.27

 

27.45

 

 

On March 15, 2006, the last reported sale price for our common stock on the Nasdaq National Market was $33.27 per share. There were approximately 1,314 holders of record of our common stock as of March 15, 2006.

We have never paid any cash dividends on our Class A common stock. The Board presently intends to retain all earnings, if any, for use in the business. Any future determination as to payment of dividends will depend upon our financial condition and results of operations and such other factors as are deemed relevant by the Board. Further, under the terms of the Indenture governing our 6 ¼% Senior Subordinated Notes, we and our Restricted Subsidiaries (as defined) are limited in our ability to pay cash dividends or make certain other restricted payments (other than stock dividends) on our Class A common stock.

ITEM 6.                SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

Selected historical financial data presented below as of and for the years ended December 31, 2001 and 2002 have been derived from our audited consolidated financial statements which have been audited

42




by KPMG LLP, independent registered public accounting firm. Selected financial data presented below as of and for the years ended December 31, 2003, 2004 and 2005 have been derived from our audited consolidated financial statements which have been audited by Deloitte & Touche LLP, independent registered public accounting firm. The following financial information reflects the acquisitions of certain businesses during the period 2001 through 2005, including the acquisition of 65% of the equity of Serigrafica Chilena S.A. (“SERCHI”) since June 5, 2002 and the acquisition of  the remaining 35% minority interest of SERCHI since April 2005, the acquisition of MDI Entertainment, Inc. since January 10, 2003, the acquisition of IGT OnLine Entertainment Systems, Inc. (“OES”) since November 6, 2003, and the acquisition of Honsel on December 31, 2004. The following summary presents selected financial data for the years ended December 31, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004 and 2005. These data should be read in conjunction with Item 7, Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations, and the Consolidated Financial Statements and the Notes thereto, included in Item 8 of this Form 10-K.

43




FIVE YEAR SUMMARY OF SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA
(in thousands, except per share amounts)

 

 

Year Ended December 31,

 

 

 

2001

 

2002

 

2003

 

2004(d)

 

2005(h)

 

Selected Statement of Operations Data:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating Revenues:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Services

 

$

364,567

 

382,818

 

452,564

 

590,984

 

639,327

 

Sales

 

75,674

 

72,435

 

108,347

 

134,511

 

142,356

 

 

 

440,241

 

455,253

 

560,911

 

725,495

 

781,683

 

Costs and Expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cost of services (exclusive of depreciation and amortization)

 

231,285

 

221,038

 

247,730

 

318,989

 

351,430

 

Cost of sales (exclusive of depreciation and amortization)

 

47,158

 

47,412

 

76,082

 

92,231

 

100,621

 

Amortization of service contract software

 

4,366

 

4,930

 

5,312

 

5,799

 

7,007

 

Selling, general and administrative

 

56,695

 

63,132

 

80,074

 

105,274

 

131,844

 

Depreciation and amortization (g)

 

49,132

 

37,905

 

42,373

 

55,478

 

59,787

 

Interest expense

 

50,363

 

44,842

(a)

26,397

 

30,952

 

26,548

 

Other (income) expense

 

37

 

636

 

1,184

 

(748

)

(1,700

)

Equity in loss of joint ventures (e)

 

 

 

 

6,060

 

2,064

 

Early extinguishment of debt

 

 

22,501

(b)

293

 

16,868

(f)

478

 

Total costs and expenses

 

439,036

 

442,396

 

479,445

 

630,903

 

678,079

 

Income (loss) before income tax expense (benefit) 

 

1,205

 

12,857

 

81,466

 

94,592

 

103,604

 

Income tax expense (benefit)

 

6,067

 

(26,875

)(c)

29,319

 

28,850

 

28,285

 

Net income (loss)

 

(4,862

)

39,732

 

52,147

 

65,742

 

75,319

 

Convertible preferred stock dividend

 

7,051

 

7,484

 

7,661

 

4,721

 

 

Net income (loss) available to common stockholders

 

$

(11,913

)

32,248

 

44,486

 

61,021

 

75,319

 

Basic and diluted income (loss) per share:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic net income (loss) available to common stockholders (g)

 

$

(0.30

)

0.64

 

0.74

 

0.84

 

0.84

 

Diluted net income (loss) available to common stockholders (g)

 

$

(0.30

)

0.50

 

0.59

 

0.72

 

0.81

 

Weighted average number of shares used in per share calculation:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic shares

 

40,340

 

50,221

 

60,010

 

73,014

 

89,327

 

Diluted shares

 

40,340

 

80,151

 

88,143

 

90,710

 

92,484

 

Selected Balance Sheet Data (End of Period):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total assets

 

$

585,796

 

636,789

 

962,989

 

1,093,225

 

1,172,513

 

Total long-term debt, including current installments

 

$

439,735

 

360,529

 

532,163

 

610,878

 

580,735

 

Stockholders’ equity

 

$

20,240

 

168,770

 

237,152

 

300,564

 

386,833

 

Ratio of earnings to fixed charges

 

1.0x

 

1.3x

 

3.6x

 

3.8x

 

4.4x

 


The following notes are an integral part of these selected historical consolidated financial data.

(a)           Includes $3,300 in debt restructuring charges related to interest rate swaps that were settled in connection with the refinancing of our 2000 senior secured credit facility (the “2000 Facility”).

44




(b)          Reflects early extinguishment of debt costs of $10,226 incurred in connection with the write-off of deferred financing fees related to our refinancing of the 2000 Facility, the payment of $11,172 of redemption premium from the repurchase of a portion of our 121¤2% Senior Subordinated Notes and the payment of $1,103 in bank fees to permit us to use a majority of the net proceeds from the July 2002 public offering and sale of 14,375 shares of our Class A Common Stock at a price of $7.25 per share to redeem subordinated debt.

(c)           Includes an income tax benefit of $32,900 from the recognition of net operating loss carryforwards (“NOL”) at December 31, 2002.

(d)          Includes approximately $3,100 of unusual charges in the pari-mutuel segment.

(e)           Reflects a $6,060 and $2,064 charge in 2004 and 2005, respectively, for our share of the losses of the Italian joint venture that began selling instant tickets in 2004 and our share of losses in the EGC joint venture.

(f)             Includes early extinguishment of debt costs of $16,868 incurred in connection with the write-off deferred financing fees related to our refinancing of the 2003 Facility and the payment of $6,862 of redemption premium for the purchase of most of our 121¤2% Senior Subordinated Notes.

(g)           On January 1, 2002, we adopted Statement No. 142, Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets (“SFAS 142”). SFAS 142 requires that goodwill and intangible assets with indefinite useful lives no longer be amortized. Instead, they will be tested for impairment at least annually in accordance with the provisions of SFAS 142.

(h)          Includes a charge of $12,363 related to the curtailment of the Supplemental Executive Retirement Plan, a non-tax deductible charge of $1,658 in connection with the earn-out on the Honsel acquisition, $2,230 unusual charge in the Lottery segment for defective tickets and $5,291 for unusual and restructuring charges relating to the pari-mutuel segment.

45




ITEM 7.                MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

Background

To present a better understanding of the overall business of Scientific Games Corporation and its consolidated subsidiaries (together, “we”), we begin Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations (“MD&A”) with an overview of our business and major operating segments, including any significant events that have occurred in the periods presented. We then provide a discussion of our Critical Accounting Policies, including our revenue recognition policy, our valuation of long-lived intangible assets and goodwill, our income tax methodology and the use of estimates and assumptions throughout our financial results. We then present an evaluation of our Internal Control over Financial Reporting and any Related Party Transactions. We then discuss our Results of Operations, presenting first an overall view of the financial results of the business as a whole, followed by additional discussion of our operating segments. We then review our financial condition, explaining changes in our balance sheet and cash flows, along with our outstanding debt, contractual obligations and commitments. We then detail any New Accounting Pronouncements and clarify their impact on our financial statements.

The first and fourth quarters of the calendar year traditionally comprise the weakest season for our pari-mutuel wagering business. As a result of inclement weather during the winter months, a number of racetracks do not operate and those that do operate often experience missed racing days. This adversely affects the amounts wagered and our corresponding service revenues. Pari-mutuel and lottery equipment sales and software license revenues usually reflect a limited number of large transactions, which do not recur on an annual basis. Consequently, revenues and operating results can vary substantially from period to period as a result of the timing of revenue recognition for major equipment sales and software licensing transactions. In addition, instant ticket and prepaid phone card sales may vary depending on the season and timing of contract awards, changes in customer budgets, inventory ticket levels, lottery retail sales and general economic conditions.

Operating results may also vary significantly from period to period depending on the addition or disposition of business units in each period. The acquisition of MDI Entertainment, Inc. (“MDI”) in January 2003, the acquisition of OES in November 2003, the acquisition of Honsel in December 2004 and the acquisition of the remaining 35% minority interest in Scientific Games Latin America S.A. (“SGLA”), all of which were accounted for as purchases, affect the comparability of operations from period to period (see Note 3 to the Consolidated Financial Statements).

The following discussion addresses our financial condition as of December 31, 2005 and the results of our operations for the twelve months ended December 31, 2005 compared to the corresponding periods in the prior fiscal year of 2004 and our financial condition as of December 31, 2004 and the results of our operations for the twelve months ended December 31, 2004 compared to the corresponding period in the fiscal year of 2003.

Background

We operate primarily in four business segments: Lottery Group, Pari-mutuel Group, Venue Management Group and Telecommunications Products Group. Our revenues consist of two major components: services revenues and sales revenues.

Lottery Group

We provide instant tickets and related services and lottery systems. Instant ticket and related services includes ticket design and manufacturing as well as value-added services, including game design, sales and marketing support, inventory management and warehousing and fulfillment services. Additionally, this

46




division provides lotteries with over 80 licensed brand products, including NASCAR®, Mandalay Bay®, National Basketball Association®, Harley-Davidson®, Wheel-of-Fortune®, Hasbro®, Corvette®, World Poker Tour® and The World Series of Poker®. This division also includes promotional instant tickets and pull-tab tickets that we sell to both lottery and non-lottery customers. Our lottery systems business includes the supply of transaction processing software for the accounting and validation of instant ticket and online lottery games, point-of-sale terminal hardware sales, central site computers and communication hardware sales, and ongoing support and maintenance services for these products. This business also includes software and hardware and support services for sports betting and operation of credit card processing systems.

In April 2005, we acquired the remaining 35% minority interest in SGLA, a supplier of lottery tickets, pre-paid phone cards and promotional games in Latin America. We originally acquired a 65% interest in SGLA in June 2002.

On December 31, 2004, we acquired Honsel, a German company which is the supplier of instant lottery tickets to all of the 16 state operated lotteries in Germany and sells other lottery products, such as bet slips and paper rolls, to customers in approximately 25 countries. We believe that our acquisition of Honsel has enabled us to further expand into the European lottery market. For example, we recently announced that we have been awarded two contracts with Toto-Lotto Niedersachsen GmbH and one contract with Lotterie-Treuhandgesellschaft mbH Hessen, the state lottery of Hessen, Germany, to supply instant lottery tickets and the other lottery services.

On November 6, 2003, we acquired OES from International Game Technology. OES operated online lottery systems in seven states and supports systems sold to customers in Korea, Norway, Switzerland and Shanghai. The acquisition also included OES’s Advanced Games System (AGS) video system contracts in six jurisdictions, certain intellectual property and an exclusive license to specific IGT slot brands for both instant and online games. The excess of the $143.0 million purchase price, plus expenses and a working capital payment of approximately $7.0 million, over the fair values of the net assets acquired is approximately $95.1 million and has been recorded as goodwill. The operating results of OES have been included in the Company’s consolidated operating results since the date of acquisition. Had the operating results of OES been included as if the transaction had been consummated on January 1, 2003, the Company’s pro forma revenue and net income available to common shareholders for the twelve months ended December 31, 2003 would have been $688.0 million and $49.3 million, respectively.

On January 17, 2003, we completed the acquisition of MDI and significantly expanded our offerings of licensed branded products and prize fulfillment and related services. The MDI acquisition was recorded using the purchase method of accounting and the acquired assets and liabilities have been recorded at their estimated fair values at the date of acquisition. The excess of the approximately $23.0 million purchase price over the fair values of the net assets acquired is approximately $22.2 million and has been recorded as goodwill. The operating results of MDI have been included in our consolidated operating results since January 10, 2003. Had the operating results of MDI been included as if the transaction had been consummated on January 1, 2003, our pro forma operating results for the year ended December 31, 2003 would not have been materially different from the actual reported results.

Pari-Mutuel Group

We are a worldwide provider of computerized wagering systems to the pari-mutuel wagering industry. We provide our systems and services to horse and greyhound racetracks, OTB facilities, casinos, jai alai frontons, telephone and internet account wagering operators and other establishments where pari-mutuel wagering is permitted. In addition, we are a provider of ancillary services to the industry, such as race simulcasting and telecommunications services and telephone and internet account wagering.

47




We believe our systems processed more than 50% of the estimated $19 billion in pari-mutuel wagering conducted on racing in North America in 2005. In our North American pari-mutuel business, we enter into service contracts, typically with an initial term of five years, pursuant to which we are paid a percentage of all wagers processed by our wagering systems, and we receive additional fees for our ancillary services, on either a per event or a monthly subscription basis. In most international markets, we sell our pari-mutuel wagering systems and terminals to pari-mutuel operators.

Venue Management Group

We have the right to operate in perpetuity substantially all off-track pari-mutuel wagering in Connecticut (with the exception of OTB operations at two greyhound racetracks), subject to our compliance with certain licensing requirements. Our Connecticut operations consist of 11 OTB facilities, including video simulcasting at two teletheaters and four other branches, and telephone account wagering for customers in 25 states. We also, now hold one of five OTB licenses within the state of Maine.

We have the right to operate all on-track and off-track pari-mutuel wagering in the Netherlands under a license granted by the Dutch Ministry of Agriculture which extends through June 2008. We currently conduct operations in 28 OTB locations and four racetracks throughout the Netherlands.

We also operate one OTB location in Maine and provide facilities management services to four non-company owned OTBs.

Telecommunications Products Group

We are a worldwide manufacturer of prepaid phone cards, which entitle cellular phone users to a defined value of airtime. Prepaid phone cards offer consumers a cost-effective way to purchase cellular airtime, without requiring phone companies to extend credit or consumers to commit to contracts.

Prepaid phone cards utilize the secure process that we employ in the production of instant lottery tickets. This helps to ensure integrity and reliability of the product, thus providing consumers in more than 50 countries with access to prepaid cellular phone service.

Critical Accounting Policies

The SEC defines “critical accounting policies” as those that require application of management’s most difficult, subjective or complex judgments, often as a result of the need to make estimates about the effect of matters that are inherently uncertain and may change in subsequent periods.

The following is not intended to be a comprehensive list of all of our accounting policies. Our significant accounting policies are more fully described in Note 1 to the Consolidated Financial Statements. In many cases, the accounting treatment of a particular transaction is specifically dictated by accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America, with no need for management’s judgment in their application. There are also areas in which management’s judgment in selecting an available alternative would not produce a materially different result.

We have identified the following as accounting policies critical to our revenue recognition, valuation of long-lived and intangible assets and goodwill, income taxes and management estimates.

Revenue recognition

The Company recognizes revenue when it is realized or realizable and earned. The Company considers revenue realized or realizable and earned when it has persuasive evidence of an arrangement, prices are fixed or determinable, services and products are provided to the customer and collectibility is probable or reasonably assured depending on the applicable revenue recognition guidance followed. In

48




addition to the general policy discussed above, the following are the specific revenue recognition policies for our operating segments:

Lottery Group

Revenue from the sale of instant tickets that are sold on a per unit price basis is recognized when the customer accepts the product pursuant to the terms of the contract.

Revenue from the sale of instant tickets that are sold on a variable price basis is recognized when the percentage of the amount of retail sales is determined.

Revenue from cooperative service contracts is recognized based upon a percentage of the amount of the retail value of lottery tickets pursuant to the terms of the contract.

Revenue from licensing branded property coupled with a service component whereby we purchase and distribute merchandise prizes on behalf of the lottery authorities to identified winners is recognized on a performance based measure pursuant to the terms of the contract.

Revenue from licensing of branded property with no service component is recognized when the licensed property branded game goes on sale by the lottery.

Revenue from online lottery services is recognized as a percentage of the amount of retail sales of lottery tickets pursuant to the terms of the contract.

Revenue from the sale of a lottery system, which includes the customization of software,  is recognized on the percentage of completion method of accounting.

Revenue from the perpetual licensing of customized lottery software is recognized on the percentage of completion method of accounting.

Revenue derived from software maintenance on lottery software is recognized ratably over the maintenance period.

Revenue derived from enhancements to lottery software is recognized at the time we provide such enhancements.

Revenue from the sale of lottery terminals is recognized when the customer accepts the product pursuant to the terms of the contract.

Pari-mutuel Group

Revenue from the provision of pari-mutuel wagering services is generally recognized as a percentage of the amount wagered by our customers’ patrons at the time of the wager pursuant to the terms of the contract.

Revenue from the provision of simulcasting and telecommunications services is recognized as the services are performed pursuant to the terms of the contract.

Revenue from the sale of a pari-mutuel wagering system, which includes the customization of software, is recognized on the percentage of completion method of accounting.

Revenue from the sale of pari-mutuel wagering terminals is recognized when the customer accepts the product pursuant to the terms of the contract.

Revenue from the perpetual licensing of customized pari-mutuel software is recognized on the percentage of completion method of accounting.

49




Venue Management Group

Revenue from wagering at Company owned or operated sites is recognized as a percentage of the amount wagered by our customers at the time of the wager.

Revenue from the provision of facilities management services to non-Company owned wagering sites is recognized as a percentage of the amount wagered by our customers’ patrons at the time of the wager pursuant to the terms of the contract.

Telecommunications Products Group

Revenue from the sale of prepaid phone cards is recognized when the customer accepts the product pursuant to the terms of the contract.

Valuation of long-lived and intangible assets and goodwill

We assess the recoverability of long-lived assets and intangible assets and goodwill whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying value of the asset may not be recoverable. Factors we consider important which could trigger an impairment review include:

·       significant underperformance relative to expected historical performance or projected future operating results;

·       significant changes in the manner of or use of the acquired assets or the strategy of our overall business;

·       significant adverse change in the legality of our business ventures or the business climate in which we operate; and

·       loss of a significant customer.

When we determine that the carrying value of the long-lived assets, intangible assets and goodwill may not be recoverable based upon the existence of one or more of the above indicators of impairment, we measure any impairment based on the projected discounted cash flow, using a discount rate equal to our weighted average cost of capital, or by a comparison to third party indications of fair market value. At December 31, 2005, the net carrying value of our long-lived assets, intangible assets and goodwill amounted to approximately $839 million.

We performed an annual impairment test for fiscal 2004 and 2005 in accordance with SFAS 142 and no adjustment was required to the carrying value of our goodwill or intangible assets with indefinite useful lives as of December 31, 2004 or 2005.

Income Taxes

We account for income taxes in accordance with Statement of Financial Accounting Standard No. 109, “Accounting for Income Taxes” (“SFAS 109”). Under SFAS 109, deferred tax assets and liabilities are determined based on the difference between the book and tax bases of assets and liabilities, using enacted tax rates in effect for the year in which the differences are expected to reverse. Deferred tax assets are recognized if it is more likely than not that the assets will be realized in future years. The Company establishes a valuation allowance for deferred tax assets for which realization is unlikely.

The Company accounts for income tax contingencies in accordance with the Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 5, “Accounting for Contingencies”.

50




Management estimates

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Some of the more significant estimates made by management involve percentage of completion for contracted lottery and pari-mutuel wagering systems, as discussed above, evaluation of the recoverability of assets including accounts receivable, inventories and long-lived assets and the assessment of litigation and contingencies, and income taxes.

Management specifically evaluates the recoverability of accounts receivable by analyzing historical bad debts, customer concentrations, customer credit-worthiness, past collection experiences with specific customers, current economic trends and changes in customer payment terms. We do not require our customers to provide collateral for services provided pursuant to our service contracts. For sales of equipment and wagering systems to international customers we generally require that no less than a significant portion of the amounts to be paid be collateralized by irrevocable letters of credit. Changes in the underlying financial condition of our customers could result in a material impact to our results of operation and financial position.

Our inventory consists principally of parts and finished goods to which we provide a reserve for obsolete and slow moving items. We continually evaluate the adequacy of our reserves by reviewing historical rates of scrap, on-hand quantities as compared to historical and projected usage levels, orders for new equipment, and contractual requirements to service our installed base of equipment.

We record a liability pertaining to pending litigation based on our best estimate of a probable loss, if any, or at the minimum end of the range of loss in circumstances where the range of loss can be reasonably estimated. Because of uncertainties surrounding the nature of litigation and the ultimate liability to us, if any, we continually revise our estimated losses as additional facts become known.

Internal Control over Financial Reporting

During 2004, we held a minority equity interest in an incorporated Italian consortium (which was formed in 2003 and began operations in mid-2004) that was accounted for under the cost basis of accounting. Subsequent to year end, we determined that because we had a 20% equity interest in an entity of that type, our pro-rata share of losses of the consortium in 2004 should have been recognized using the equity method of accounting. An adjustment for this matter along with certain other adjustments related to non-routine or complex accounting matters, which in the aggregate were material to the financial statements, were necessary to fairly present the financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2004 in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States. As a result, when we assessed the effectiveness of our internal controls over financial reporting as of December 31, 2004, we had a material weakness in the design of internal controls because we had insufficient personnel resources and technical accounting expertise within the accounting function to resolve non-routine or complex accounting matters, such as the treatment of the Italian consortium.

In 2005, we remediated our material weakness in the design of internal controls over financial reporting. We added additional personnel resources to our financial staff and established a review process that addresses current and future complex and standard accounting issues that affect our business. We also improved our accounting research abilities by subscribing to multiple accounting resources and publications. As of December 31, 2005, we believe our internal controls over financial reporting are effective.

51




Related Party Transactions

Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 57, Related Party Disclosures, requires us to identify and describe material transactions involving related persons or entities and to disclose information necessary to understand the effects of such transactions on our consolidated financial statements. We are not a party to material transactions involving related persons or entities.

Results of Operations

Year Ended December 31, 2005 Compared to Year Ended December 31, 2004

The following analysis compares our results of operations for the year ended December 31, 2005 to the results for the year ended December 31, 2004.

Overview

Revenue Analysis

For the year ended December 31, 2005, total revenue was $781.7 million compared to $725.5 million, an improvement of $56.2 million or 8% overall as compared to the prior year. Our service revenue was $639.3 million compared to $591.0 million in fiscal year 2004, an increase of $48.3 million, or 8%. Our sales revenue was $142.4 million compared to $134.5 million in the prior year, an increase of an $7.9 million, or 6%.

Expense Analysis

Cost of services of $351.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2005 were $32.4 million or 10% higher than in 2004. This increase is due to higher operating costs in each segment. Cost of sales of $100.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2005 were $8.4 million or 9% higher than in 2004 due to higher sales revenues in the Lottery Group and the Pari-Mutuel Group. Amortization of service contract software of $7.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2005 was $1.2 million higher than in 2004 because of the addition of new customers.

Selling, general and administrative expenses of $131.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2005 were $26.6 million or 25% higher than for 2004. This increase is due to a charge relating to the curtailment of our Supplemental Executive Retirement Plan (the “SERP”) for approximately $12.4 million (see Note 16 to the Consolidated Financial Statements). Also contributing to the increase is a non tax-deductible charge of $1.7 million in connection with the earn-out on the Honsel acquisition, $3.0 million of unanticipated legal and related consulting and severance expenses in connection with unusual matters in North Carolina, Chile, New Jersey and elsewhere, incurred charges of $2.4 million for restructuring costs and to discontinue certain unprofitable racing-related businesses and the compensation and recruitment expenses of newly appointed key personnel such as the Chief Operating Officer.

Depreciation and amortization expense, including amortization of service contract software, of $66.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2005 increased $5.5 million or 9% from 2004, primarily due to the addition of new lottery contracts, including Colorado, Puerto Rico and Oklahoma.

Interest expense of $26.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2005 decreased $4.4 million or 14% from 2004, primarily as a result of the lower interest rates associated with our December 2004 debt structure. (See “Liquidity, Capital Resources and Working Capital.”)

Equity in loss of joint ventures reflects our share of the losses of the Italian joint venture in connection with the operation of the Italian Gratta e Vinci instant lottery. In 2005, our share of the consortium’s losses totaled $1.7 million compared to $6.1 million in 2004. In 2004 the joint venture experienced costs in excess of revenues relating to the re-launch of the lottery. The loss in 2005 was less than in 2004 because of

52




increased sales of instant tickets. Also included in equity loss in joint ventures is our 50% share of the losses of our joint venture with Electronic Game Card, Inc. (“EGC”) in connection with our efforts to jointly market and promote electronic lottery game cards. In 2005, our share of the EGC joint venture’s losses totaled approximately $0.4 million compared to $0 in 2004.

The effective tax rate decreased to 27.3% in 2005 from 30.5% in 2004. In 2005, the Company recorded a federal tax benefit of 5.8% related to the realization of research and development credits, of which 4.5% will not recur. In 2005, the Company also recorded a federal benefit of 3.7% from the amortization of original issue discount related to the issuance of long term debt in 2004. The Company’s tax rate will continue to reflect a benefit from this amortization through 2010. The effect of these tax benefits were partially offset by a 4.2% reduction in the federal tax benefit for extraterritorial income exclusion and a smaller release of the valuation allowance in 2005 of 1.7%.

Segment Overview

 

 

Year Ended December 31, 2005

 

 

 

Lottery
Group

 

Pari-
Mutuel
Group

 

Venue
Management
Group

 

Telecommunications
Products
Group

 

Totals

 

 

 

(in thousands)

 

Service revenues

 

$

506,930

 

71,545

 

 

60,852

 

 

 

 

 

639,327

 

Sales revenues

 

75,430

 

10,313

 

 

 

 

 

56,613

 

 

142,356

 

Total revenues

 

582,360

 

81,858

 

 

60,852

 

 

 

56,613

 

 

781,683

 

Cost of services (exclusive of depreciation and amortization)

 

257,387

 

47,255

 

 

46,788

 

 

 

 

 

351,430

 

Cost of sales (exclusive of depreciation and amortization)

 

53,300

 

7,041

 

 

 

 

 

40,280

 

 

100,621

 

Amortization of service contract  software

 

4,778

 

2,229

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7,007

 

Selling, general and administrative expenses

 

68,053

 

12,265

 

 

3,263

 

 

 

5,600

 

 

89,181

 

Depreciation and amortization

 

43,438

 

9,654

 

 

1,960

 

 

 

3,556

 

 

58,608

 

Segment operating income

 

$

155,404

 

3,414

 

 

8,841

 

 

 

7,177

 

 

174,836

 

Unallocated corporate selling, general and administrative costs and depreciation and amortization

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

43,842

 

Consolidated operating income

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

130,994

 

Interest expense

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

26,548

 

 

53




 

 

 

Year Ended December 31, 2004

 

 

 

Lottery
Group

 

Pari-
Mutuel
Group

 

Venue
Management
Group

 

Telecommunications
Products
Group

 

Totals

 

 

 

(in thousands)

 

Service revenues

 

$

451,056

 

78,397

 

 

61,531

 

 

 

 

 

590,984

 

Sales revenues

 

62,506

 

4,140

 

 

 

 

 

67,865

 

 

134,511

 

Total revenues

 

513,562

 

82,537

 

 

61,531

 

 

 

67,865

 

 

725,495

 

Cost of services (exclusive of depreciation and amortization)

 

229,502

 

44,780

 

 

44,707

 

 

 

 

 

318,989

 

Cost of sales (exclusive of depreciation and amortization)

 

40,041

 

2,381

 

 

 

 

 

49,809

 

 

92,231

 

Amortization of service contract  Software

 

3,338

 

2,461

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5,799

 

Selling, general and administrative expenses

 

58,630

 

9,495

 

 

4,084

 

 

 

6,313

 

 

78,522

 

Depreciation and amortization

 

38,470

 

10,808

 

 

1,951

 

 

 

3,305

 

 

54,534

 

Segment operating income

 

$

143,581

 

12,612

 

 

10,789

 

 

 

8,438

 

 

175,420

 

Unallocated corporate selling, general and administrative costs and depreciation and amortization

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

27,696

 

Consolidated operating income

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

147,724

 

Interest expense

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

30,952

 

 

Lottery Group

For the year ended December 31, 2005, total revenue for the Lottery Group was $582.4 million compared to $513.6 million in the corresponding period in the prior year, an increase of $68.8 million, or 13%. In the year ended December 31, 2005, the Lottery Group service revenue was $506.9 million compared to $451.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2004, an increase of $55.8 million, or 12%. The increase was attributable to the strong demand for our branded and licensed property lottery products and strong sales of instant lottery tickets. The increase was also due to the addition of new lottery contracts such as Colorado, Puerto Rico, Oklahoma and Spain, which all began in 2005, partially offset by a $1.4 million defective ticket charge and the loss of approximately $30.0 million of revenues on the Florida online lottery contract, which ended in January 2005.

The Lottery Group sales revenue for the year ended December 31, 2005, was $75.4 million compared to $62.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2004, an increase of $12.9 million, or 21%. The increase was due to the addition of Honsel from the beginning of fiscal year 2005, offset by lower sales of lottery systems and terminals.

Cost of services of $257.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2005 were $27.9 million or 12% higher than in 2004. This increase is due to higher operating costs as a result of the addition of new customers and higher revenue in the year. Cost of sales of $53.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2005 were $13.3 million or 33% higher than in 2004 due to a 21% increase in sales revenues and the addition of Honsel for 2005. Amortization of service contract software of $4.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2005 was $1.4 million higher than in 2004 because of the addition of new customers.

Selling, general and administrative expenses of $68.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2005 were $9.4 million higher than in the year ended December 31, 2004. This increase is primarily due to incremental selling, general and administrative expenses from the addition of Honsel for the full year, a non tax-deductible charge of $1.7 million in connection with the earn-out on the Honsel acquisition and

54




unanticipated legal and related consulting and severance expenses of $3.0 million in connection with unusual matters in North Carolina, Chile and New Jersey.

Depreciation and amortization expense, including amortization of service contract software, of $48.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2005 increased $6.4 million, as compared to the year ended December 31, 2004, primarily due to the  amortization of deferred installation costs of new lottery contracts such as Colorado, Puerto Rico and Oklahoma, as well as a full year on Honsel. Amortization costs increased because of the addition of new properties for our licensed product offerings.

Pari-Mutuel Group

For the year ended December 31, 2005, total revenue for the Pari-mutuel Group was $81.9 million compared to $82.5 million in the year ended December 31, 2004, a decrease of $0.6 million, or 1%. Pari-mutuel Group service revenue for the year ended 2005 was $71.5 million compared to $ 78.4 million from the year ended 2004, a decrease of $6.9 million, or 9%. The decrease in service revenues reflects lower Handle in the domestic and foreign pari-mutuel business and the loss of the New York Racing Association (“NYRA”) contract. We believe the trend in reduced wagering will continue in the future.

The Pari-mutuel Group sales revenue for the year ended December 31, 2005 was $ 10.3 million compared to $4.1 million in the prior fiscal year an increase of $6.2 million, or 149%. The increase was due to increased system sales in Europe in 2005. Pari-mutuel system sales usually reflect a limited number of large transactions, which do not recur on an annual basis.

Cost of services of $47.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2005 were $2.5 million or 6% higher than in 2004. This increase is due to higher operating costs as a result of weather related losses due to hurricanes, the integration of four European racing operations into our European racing center in Essen, Germany and costs associated with the termination of certain unprofitable racing contracts. Cost of sales of $7.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2005 were $4.6 million higher than in 2004 due to a 149% increase in sales revenues. Amortization of service contract software of $2.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2005 was $0.2 million less than in 2004 because certain contract software costs have been fully amortized.

Selling, general and administrative expenses of $12.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2005 were $2.8 million higher than in the year ended December 31, 2004. This increase is primarily due to charges of $2.4 million relating to restructuring costs in Europe and the discontinuance of certain unprofitable racing related businesses along with higher compensation, professional fees and marketing costs.

Venue Management Group

For the year ended December 31, 2005, total revenue for the Venue Management Group was $60.9 million compared to $61.5 million in the year ended December 31, 2004, a decrease of $0.6 million, or 1%. The decrease is attributable to reduced Handle, coupled with a smoking ban in Connecticut that became effective at the beginning of the second quarter of 2004, offset slightly by the addition of the Maine OTB operation and higher non-wagering services. We believe the trend in reduced wagering may continue in  the near future.

Cost of services of $46.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2005 were $2.1 million or 5% higher than in 2004. This increase is due to increased communication and operating costs and $0.4 million of restructuring costs in the Netherlands.

55




Selling, general and administrative expenses of $3.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2005 were $0.8 million lower than in the year ended December 31, 2004 as the result of cost reduction measures taken in 2005.

Telecommunications Products Group

For the year ended December 31, 2005, total revenue for the Telecommunications Products Group was $56.6 million compared to $67.9 million in the year ended December 31, 2004, a decrease of $11.3 million, or 17%.   The decrease is primarily due to a large sale in 2004 to a customer in Africa that did not recur in 2005 and to a lesser extent the change in the mix of sheet and web based products and continued industry pricing pressures.

Cost of sales of $40.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2005 were $9.5 million or 19% less than in 2004 due to a 17% decrease in sales revenues primarily because of a significant sale in 2004 to a customer in Africa that did not recur.

Selling, general and administrative expenses of $5.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2005 were $0.7 million lower than in the year ended December 31, 2004. This decrease is associated with cost reductions taken in 2005 and a favorable foreign exchange rate.

Year Ended December 31, 2004 Compared to Year Ended December 31, 2003

The following analysis compares our results of operations for the year ended December 31, 2004 to the results for the year ended December 31, 2003.

Overview

Revenue Analysis

For the year ended December 31, 2004, total revenue was $725.5 million compared to $560.9 million an improvement of $164.6 million or 29% overall as compared to the prior year. Our service revenue was $591.0 million compared to $452.6 million in fiscal year 2003, an increase of $138.4 million, or 31%. Our sales revenue was $134.5 million compared to $108.3 million in the prior year, an increase of a $26.2 million, or 24%.

Expense Analysis

Cost of services of $319.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2004 were $71.3 million or 29% higher than in 2003. This increase is primarily due to higher operating costs the Lottery Group as a result of the purchase of the OES business in the fall of 2003. Cost of sales of $92.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2004 were $16.1 million or 21% higher than in 2003 due to a 24% increase in sales revenues in 2004. Amortization of service contract software of $5.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2004 was $0.5 million higher than in 2003 because of the addition of new customers in the Lottery Group.

Selling, general and administrative expenses of $105.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2004 were $25.2 million or 31% higher than for 2003. This increase is primarily due to incremental selling, general and administrative expenses in the Lottery Group from the addition of OES for the full year. Also included is an increase of approximately $4.5 million for legal and consulting fees relating to the international tax restructuring costs and Sarbanes-Oxley compliance efforts.

Depreciation and amortization expense, including amortization of service contract software, of $61.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2004 increased $13.6 million or 29% from 2003, primarily due to the acquisition of OES and the amortization of deferred installation costs of new lottery contracts.

56




Interest expense of $31.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2004 increased $4.6 million or 17% from 2003, primarily as a result of the increased debt in November 2003. (See “Liquidity, Capital Resources and Working Capital.”)

Equity in loss of joint venture of $6.1 million was the result of the launch of the Italian Gratta e Vinci instant lottery during 2004. Such charge represents our share of the losses of the consortium in 2004.

The effective tax rate decreased to 30.5% in 2004 from 36.0% in 2003. The decrease in effective tax rate is attributable to the federal benefit of the extraterritorial income exclusion and a decrease in the valuation allowance for certain deferred tax assets.

Segment Overview

 

 

Year Ended December 31, 2004

 

 

 

Lottery
Group

 

Pari-Mutuel
Group

 

Venue
Management
Group

 

Telecommunications
Products
Group

 

Totals

 

 

 

(in thousands)

 

Service revenues

 

$

451,056

 

 

78,397

 

 

 

61,531

 

 

 

 

 

590,984

 

Sales revenues

 

62,506

 

 

4,140

 

 

 

 

 

 

67,865

 

 

134,511

 

Total revenues

 

513,562

 

 

82,537

 

 

 

61,531

 

 

 

67,865

 

 

725,495

 

Cost of services (exclusive of depreciation and amortization)

 

229,502

 

 

44,780

 

 

 

44,707

 

 

 

 

 

318,989

 

Cost of sales (exclusive of depreciation and amortization)

 

40,041

 

 

2,381

 

 

 

 

 

 

49,809

 

 

92,231

 

Amortization of service contract software

 

3,338

 

 

2,461

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5,799

 

Selling, general and administrative expenses

 

58,630

 

 

9,495

 

 

 

4,084

 

 

 

6,313

 

 

78,522

 

Depreciation and amortization

 

38,470

 

 

10,808

 

 

 

1,951

 

 

 

3,305

 

 

54,534

 

Segment operating income

 

143,581

 

 

12,612

 

 

 

10,789

 

 

 

8,438

 

 

175,420

 

Unallocated corporate selling, general and administrative costs and depreciation and amortization

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

27,696

 

Consolidated operating income

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

147,724

 

Interest expense

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

30,952

 

 

57




 

 

Year Ended December 31, 2003

 

 

 

Lottery
Group

 

Pari-
Mutuel
Group

 

Venue
Management
Group

 

Telecommunications
Products
Group

 

Totals

 

 

 

(in thousands)

 

Service revenues

 

$

307,820

 

80,798

 

 

63,946

 

 

 

 

 

452,564

 

Sales revenues

 

54,685

 

5,399

 

 

 

 

 

48,263

 

 

108,347

 

Total revenues

 

362,505

 

86,197

 

 

63,946

 

 

 

48,263

 

 

560,911

 

Cost of services (exclusive of depreciation and amortization)

 

159,447

 

43,476

 

 

44,807

 

 

 

 

 

247,730

 

Cost of sales (exclusive of depreciation and amortization)

 

40,884

 

2,790

 

 

 

 

 

32,408

 

 

76,082

 

Amortization of service contract software

 

2,947

 

2,365

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5,312

 

Selling, general and administrative expenses

 

40,538

 

11,208

 

 

3,403

 

 

 

4,998

 

 

60,147

 

Depreciation and amortization

 

25,319

 

11,718

 

 

2,001

 

 

 

2,630

 

 

41,668

 

Segment operating income

 

93,370

 

14,640

 

 

13,735

 

 

 

8,227

 

 

129,972

 

Unallocated corporate selling,  general and administrative  costs and depreciation and amortization

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

20,632

 

Consolidated operating income

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

109,340

 

Interest expense

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

26,397

 

 

Lottery Group

For the year ended December 31, 2004, total revenue for the Lottery Group was $513.6 million compared to $362.5 million in the corresponding period in the prior year, an increase of $151.1 million, or 42%. In the year ended December 31, 2004, the Lottery Group service revenue was $451.1 million compared to $307.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2003, an increase of $143.2 million, or 47%. The increase was attributable to a full year of operations of OES, representing approximately $112 million year over year increase. The balance of the increase reflects continued strong demand for instant tickets and branded lottery products in the U.S. markets. Approximately $31 million is attributable to improvements in lottery sales, reflecting governments’ continuing confidence in lotteries to support government sponsored programs.

The Lottery Group sales revenue for the year ended December 31, 2004, was $62.5 million compared to $54.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2003, an increase of $7.8 million, or 14%. The increase was due to a full year of operations of OES coupled with an increase in international sales offset by reduced sales in the non-OES U.S. lottery operations.

Cost of services of $229.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2004 were $70.1 million or 44% higher than in 2003. This increase is due to higher operating costs as a result of the addition of the OES business in the fall of 2003 and higher revenues during the year. Cost of sales of $40.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2004 were $0.9 million lower than in 2003 due to a change in the mix of products sold. Amortization of service contract software of $3.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2004 was $0.4 million higher than in 2003 because of the addition of new customers.

Selling, general and administrative expenses of $58.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2004 were $18.1 million higher than in the year ended December 31, 2003. This increase is primarily due to incremental selling, general and administrative expenses from the addition of OES for the full year.

58




Depreciation and amortization expense, including amortization of service contract software, of $41.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2004 increased $13.5 million, primarily due to the acquisition of OES and the amortization of deferred installation costs of new lottery contracts.

Pari-Mutuel Group

For the year ended December 31, 2004, total revenue for the Pari-mutuel Group was $82.5 million compared to $86.2 million in the year ended December 31, 2003, a decrease of $3.7 million, or 4%. Pari-mutuel Group service revenue for the year ended 2004 was $78.4 million compared to $ 80.8 million from the year ended 2003, a decrease of $2.4 million, or 3%. The decrease reflects a $1.0 million one-time adjustment, lower Handle in the domestic and foreign pari-mutuel operations and a decrease in transponder lease revenue of approximately $0.7 million as a result of the elimination of an extra transponder at the end of 2003.

The Pari-mutuel Group sales revenue for the year ended December 31, 2004 was $ 4.1 million compared to $5.4 million in the prior fiscal year a decrease of $1.3 million, or 24%. The decline is a result of lower sales volume for 2004 fiscal year.

Cost of services of $44.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2004 were $1.3 million or 3% higher than in 2003. This increase is primarily due to a charge of approximately $3.1 million for unusual charges. Cost of sales of $2.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2004 were $0.4 million lower than in 2003 due to 24% decrease in sales revenues. Amortization of service contract software of $2.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2004 was $0.1 million higher than in 2003 because higher customer software customization work was mostly offset by certain contract software costs that have been fully amortized.

Selling, general and administrative expenses of $9.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2004 were $1.7 million lower than in the year ended December 31, 2003. This decrease is primarily due to $3.0 million in costs in the year ended December 31, 2003, associated with the relocation of our pari-mutuel operations from Delaware to Georgia, partially offset by higher costs in the international pari-mutuel operations and higher professional fees in the U.S. operations.

Venue Management Group

For the year ended December 31, 2004, total revenue for the Venue Management Group was $61.5 million compared to $63.9 million in the year ended December 31, 2003, a decrease of $2.4 million, or 4%.   The decrease is largely attributable to a smoking ban in Connecticut that became effective at the beginning of the second quarter of 2004.

Cost of services of $44.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2004 were $0.1 million less than in 2003. This decrease is due to cost reduction efforts throughout the year.

Selling, general and administrative expenses of $4.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2004 were $0.7 million higher than in the year ended December 31, 2003. This increase is associated with increased costs in the international operations.

Telecommunications Products Group

For the year ended December 31, 2004, total revenue for the Telecommunications Products Group was $67.9 million compared to $48.3 million in the year ended December 31, 2003, an increase of $19.6 million, or 41%.   The increase reflects increased sales to emerging markets such as Africa, combined with favorable foreign exchange rates.

Cost of sales of $49.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2004 were $17.4 million or 54% higher than in 2003 due to a 41% increase in sales to emerging markets such as Africa.

59




Selling, general and administrative expenses of $6.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2004 were $1.3 million higher than in the year ended December 31, 2003. This increase is associated with increased compensation costs coupled with negative foreign exchange impact.

Liquidity, Capital Resources and Working Capital

In December 2004, we entered into a series of financial transactions structured to create additional borrowing capacity, loosen certain financial covenants, extend the average maturity of our debt, lower our average cost of borrowing, and reduce our exposure to rising interest rates. We sold $275 million of 0.75% convertible senior subordinated debentures due 2024 (the “Convertible Debentures”), sold $200 million of 6.25% senior subordinated notes due 2012 (the “2004 Notes”), and entered into a new senior secured credit facility (the “2004 Facility”) which consists of a $250 million revolving credit facility due December 2009 and a $100 million Term Loan B due December 2009, (together, the Convertible Debentures, the 2004 Notes and the 2004 Facility, the “2004 Securities”).  The proceeds of the 2004 Securities, net of fees and expenses, were used to redeem approximately $57.9 million of the 2000 Notes (the remainder of which were redeemed in August 2005), to pay the related $6.9 million redemption premium and consent fee related to these redemptions, and to replace our existing senior secured credit facility (the “2003 Facility”).

On December 23, 2004, the Company entered into the 2004 Facility which consists of a $250 million revolving credit facility, of which $22 million was borrowed at closing, and a $100 million Term B Loan. The initial drawings under the 2004 Facility were used to repay a portion of existing senior indebtedness in conjunction with the refinancings completed in December 2004. Loans under the 2004 Facility carry interest at the Base Rate plus a margin of 0.75% per annum, or at the rate of LIBOR plus a margin of 1.75% per annum, subject to quarterly adjustment of the margin, after June 23, 2005, based on the Company’s prevailing Consolidated Leverage Ratio. Margins on Base Rate and LIBOR loans range from 1.00% to 0.25% and from 2.00% to 1.25%, respectively, with the lowest levels achieved when the Company’s Consolidated Leverage Ratio is less than 2.00 to 1.00. The Term B Loan matures in December 2009 and requires quarterly principal payments of $0.25 million through December 31, 2008 plus four quarterly principal payments of $24 million in 2009. The 2004 Facility is secured by a first priority, perfected lien on: (i) substantially all the property and assets (real and personal, tangible and intangible) of the Company and its 100%-owned domestic subsidiaries; (ii) 100% of the capital stock of all of the direct and indirect owned domestic subsidiaries and 65% of the capital stock of all of the 100%-owned first-tier foreign subsidiaries of the Company; and (iii) all inter-company indebtedness owing between the Company and its 100%-owned domestic subsidiaries. The 2004 Facility is supported by guarantees provided by all of the Company’s direct and indirect 100%-owned domestic subsidiaries.

In addition, the 2004 Facility is subject to the following mandatory prepayments, with certain customary exceptions: (i)  50% of the net cash proceeds from the sale or issuance of equity if the Company’s Consolidated Leverage ratio exceeds 3.00 to 1.00; (ii) 100% of the net cash proceeds from the sale or issuance of debt securities; and (iii) 100% of the net proceeds from the sale of assets and casualty insurance proceeds, subject to a reinvestment exclusion limited to $80 million per annum.

60




The Credit Agreement governing the 2004 Facility contains certain covenants that, among other things, limit the Company’s ability, and the ability of certain of the Company’s subsidiaries, to incur additional indebtedness, pay dividends or make distributions or certain other restricted payments, purchase or redeem capital stock, make investments or extend credit, engage in certain transactions with affiliates, engage in sale-leaseback transactions, consummate certain asset sales, effect a consolidation or merger, sell, transfer, lease or otherwise dispose of all or substantially all assets, or create certain liens and other encumbrances on assets. Additionally, the Credit Agreement contains the following financial covenants that are computed quarterly on a rolling four-quarter basis as applicable:

·       A maximum Consolidated Leverage Ratio of 3.75, which will be reduced according to the terms of the 2004 Credit Agreement on July 1, 2006, from which date until December 2009 the ratio shall be 3.50. Consolidated Leverage Ratio means the ratio of (x) the aggregate stated balance sheet amount of the Company’s indebtedness determined on a consolidated basis in accordance with GAAP as of the last day of the fiscal quarter for which such determination is being made to (y) Consolidated EBITDA for the four consecutive fiscal quarters ended on the last day of the fiscal quarter for which such determination is being made.

·       A minimum Consolidated Fixed Charge Coverage Ratio of 1.00 until December 2009. Consolidated Fixed Charge Coverage Ratio means, as of any date of determination, the ratio computed for the Company’s four most recent fiscal quarters of (x) Consolidated EBITDA to (y) the sum of (i) total interest expense less non-cash amortization costs included in interest expense, (ii) scheduled payments of principal on indebtedness, (iii) capital expenditures and (iv) all income taxes paid in cash.

·       A maximum Consolidated Senior Debt Ratio of 2.00, which will be reduced according to the terms of the 2004 Credit Agreement on July 1, 2006, from which date until December 2009 the ratio shall be 1.75. Consolidated Senior Debt Ratio means the ratio of (x) the aggregate stated balance sheet amount of the Company’s indebtedness, the 2004 Notes and the Convertible Debentures determined on a consolidated basis in accordance with GAAP as of the last day of the fiscal quarter for which such determination is being made to (y) Consolidated EBITDA for the four consecutive fiscal quarters ended on the last day of the fiscal quarter for which such determination is being made.

For purposes of the foregoing limitations, Consolidated EBITDA means the sum of (i) consolidated net income, (ii) consolidated interest expense with respect to all outstanding indebtedness, (iii) provisions for taxes based on income, (iv) total depreciation expense, (v) total amortization expense and (vi) certain adjustments, in each case for the period being measured, all of the foregoing as determined on a consolidated basis for the Company and its subsidiaries in accordance with GAAP.

The Company was in compliance with its covenants as of December 31, 2005 and for all of the quarters included in the fiscal year 2005.

61




Our contractual obligations and commercial commitments principally include obligations associated with our outstanding indebtedness and future minimum operating lease obligations, as set forth in the table below:

 

 

Cash Payments Due by Period

 

 

 

Total

 

Within 1
Year

 

2-3
Years

 

4-5
Years

 

After 5
Years

 

 

 

(in thousands)

 

Contractual Obligations:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Long-term debt, 61¤4% notes

 

200,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

200,000

 

Long-term debt, 0.75% notes (1)

 

275,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

275,000

 

Long-term debt, Term B Loan

 

99,000

 

 

1,000

 

 

2,000

 

96,000

 

 

Other long term debt

 

6,735

 

 

5,055

 

 

993

 

237

 

450

 

Interest expense (2)